Kyle Busch drives No. 18 Toyota Camry to fourth-place finish at Michigan International Speedway

first_imgKyle Busch finished fourth in the Consumers Energy 400 at Michigan International Speedway on Sunday.Busch’s top-five finish, the ninth time he has achieved that result this year, added 49 points to his season total. Busch now sits at No. 9 in the NASCAR Cup Series standings with 651 points. A total of 16 drivers make the postseason cut.Busch started in 16th position and led four laps in the race. The 17th-year driver has collected 56 career victories, with 209 top-five finishes and 307 results inside the top 10.Victory Lane at Michigan International Speedway is a familiar place for Busch, who has one career win at the track. His fourth-place finish also marks the eighth time he has finished in the top five at Michigan and his 13th top-10.The Las Vegas, Nevada native began the race three spots behind his career mark of 12.8, but finished 11 places ahead of his career average of 14.7.Busch battled against a field of 39 drivers on the way to his fourth-place finish. The race endured five cautions and 24 caution laps. There were 10 lead changes.Kevin Harvick earned the checkered flag in the race, followed by Denny Hamlin in second place and Martin Truex Jr in third. Busch placed fourth in front of Joey Logano’s fifth-place finish.After Clint Bowyer won the first stage, Harvick grabbed control and won Stage 2 before driving to victory.Kyle Busch Driver Page | Get Busch Gear | Race Centerlast_img read more

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Notre Dame alumni develop app

first_imgWith the summer swiftly approaching, students often find themselves lost in a sea of internship applications and turn to sites such as LinkedIn or GoIrish to help them in their search. Two Notre Dame alumni aim to simplify the career and internship search with CareerLightning.Frank Bugaris, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1999 with a major in accounting, created CareerLightning, a mobile app that aims to create “immediate and impactful real world career introductions,” according to its website.“A big part of the career I had in the past 10 to 15 years has been trying to find and hire people,” Bugaris said. “Although it’s one of the most rewarding parts of managing, it’s also extremely difficult. Lots of the methods are really slow or relying on word of mouth or it can cost a small fortune.”Bugaris said newspaper advertisements and websites such as LinkedIn often charge a lot for access to their resources. He said CareerLightning offers a more affordable alternative for prospective job candidates, and its results are also more immediate.“It’s all designed to be solely on your mobile device, so there’s nothing to plug in to your computer — it’s all on mobile,” Bugaris said. “Right now, I’m targeting start up technology companies and the candidates that they’re looking for. It could be a recent graduate, an intern or someone who has been out for 10 years doing all kinds of stuff.”Bugaris worked with Ben Roesch, a 2008 alumnus and co-founder of Cultivate Labs, the company responsible for the design and programming of the app.“Working with Frank was probably the strongest draw for us,” Roesch said in an email. “Lots of people have an idea or a vision for an application, but a lot of them are pretty haphazard concepts where they want to pull feature X from Facebook, feature Y from Twitter and 20 other features from all over the place. Frank had a much tighter, focused vision for the concept that became CareerLightning.”Roesch said CareerLightning gives applicants the opportunity to simplify their career search by eliminating any unnecessary frills.“The most attractive part of CareerLightning, to me, is the fact that it is focused and lightweight. It’s something that you can peek in on when you have a few minutes here or there,” Roesch said. “Contrast that with something like LinkedIn where there is so much going on that it can get overwhelming and distracting, rather than focusing on the actual career search.”Bugaris said his hope is that the app makes a difference in peoples’ lives by alleviating some of the stress that comes with any job search and decreasing the time it takes for individuals to get their applications out to potential employers.“I think it cuts down on the ‘submit your resume into the email black hole of no responses’ nonsense that seems to happen to other people,” Bugaris said. “My biggest feelings are that it decreases the time substantially from the time someone posts a position to when they can potentially get a response from somebody. Right now it’s nothing, it’s free for applicants and technology companies.”Tags: app, career app, CareerLightning, internship, job searchlast_img read more

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James Rusty Smith

first_img He was preceeded by his wife Carol of 51 years, survived by his three children, Bruce, Kelly, and Michael. He was a Port Arthur police officer and small business owner.Known by most as just “Smitty” he was well respected by the people of PA. James Rusty Smith, who was 75, passed away on September 30th at St. Elizabeth in Beaumont.Born in Port Arthur on December 21st, 1944, he never left the city he loved.center_img He also had three grandchildren, and three great grandchildren.last_img

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Vermont Evaporator challenges maple industry in charity campaign

first_imgVermont Evaporator Company,Vermont Business Magazine In honor of Native American Heritage month and in the spirit of Thanksgiving, Vermont Evaporator Company(link is external) is challenging the Vermont maple industry to join it in making a difference for native New Englanders by donating a portion of November sales. Vermont Evaporator Company has identified its chosen beneficiary as the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe of Massachusetts.“We have Native Americans to thank for maple syrup, plain and simple. Which means many Vermonters have Native Americans to thank for their way of life and their means of making a living,” said Vermont Evaporator Company CEO, Kate McCabe. “And right now, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe could use our support of their lands and their economic security, too.”In September, the U.S. Department of Interior reversed a decision made in 2015, granting the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe 321 acres of reservation land in a trust. This reversal threatens that land. Greater than anything else, the tribe is worried about the loss of the land of their ancestors and the culture that comes with that history.“We are honored to have the support of Vermont Evaporator Company,” said Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Chairman, Cedric Cromwell. “Tomorrow, November 14, 2018, we will walk and rally with our supporters in Washington DC to support H.R. 5244, pending bi-partisan legislation that would protect our tribal lands. We all look forward to knowing that Vermont Evaporator Company is in solidarity with us.”Vermont Evaporator Company and businesses that join their challenge started setting aside a portion of sales to donate to the Tribe on November 1. If your business is interested in joining this challenge, email info@vtevap.com(link sends e-mail).About Vermont Evaporator Company:The Vermont Evaporator Company, LLC, located in Montpelier, Vermont, is a family-owned business that manufactures small, home-scale sap evaporation units for the backyard maple sugaring enthusiast that are easy to use and available at a price point well below the industrial products on the market today. With two models, the full-system Sapling and the smaller Seedling for grill-top use, Vermont Evaporator Company is making New England’s favorite pastime fun, affordable, and accessible for maple lovers to create delicious maple syrup from tree to table in their own homes. For more information, visit www.vtevap.com(link is external).About the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe: The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, also known as the People of the First Light, has inhabited present day Massachusetts and Eastern Rhode Island for more than 12,000 years. After an arduous process lasting more than three decades, the Mashpee Wampanoag were re-acknowledged as a federally recognized tribe in 2007. In 2015, the federal government declared 150 acres of land in Mashpee and 170 acres of land in Taunton as the Tribe’s initial reservation, on which the Tribe can exercise its full tribal sovereignty rights. The Mashpee tribe currently has approximately 3,000 enrolled citizens.Source: MONTPELIER, Vt. — (November 13, 2018) Vermont Evaporator Company(link is external)last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgChocolate Frog Cafe restaurant closes. The Chocolate Frog Cafe at the Village Shops closed its doors this week. The owners are reportedly planning to reopen next month as a barbeque and steak restaurant. The space opened as Standees restaurant in May 2013 before closing to be rebranded as Chocolate Frog in the summer of 2015. [Prairie Village’s family-friendly Chocolate Frog changing to upscale C. Frogs — Kansas City Star]Early school funding fix proposals wouldn’t benefit Shawnee Mission. Shawnee Mission Superintendent Jim Hinson told the school board Monday that he did “not hear any scenario that benefits us” coming out of Topeka. The legislature starts its school funding special session today. Hinson had been in Topeka meeting on possible solutions Monday and said he would head back Wednesday. A new finance plan might or might not be close to agreement according to reports Thursday. [Does Kansas have a school finance agreement? Wichita school district says no – The Wichita Eagle]Shawnee Mission School District to host non-teaching career fair. The Shawnee Mission School District will hold a job fair for non-teaching positions from 1 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 19 at SM West. The school will be offering information on job opportunities as aides, paraprofessionals, custodians and maintenance staff, and food service assistants.Roeland Park looking for piano players and musicians. Roeland Park is seeking piano players and musicians of all ages to take part in “Music Under the Stars” from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 22 at the Roeland Park Community Center. Musicians interested in playing at the event should call 913-826-3160 to register.Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

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Meridian Audio Releases DSP750 In-Wall Digital Active Loudspeaker

first_imgMeridian Audio launched its latest loudspeaker from its architectural range, the DSP750 In-Wall Digital Active Loudspeaker. Claiming a host of exclusive Meridian technologies on-board, the DSP750 resets the standard of architectural loudspeaker performance, featuring:Three new, high-performance drive-units.CLASS-M DSP engine providing thermal and dynamic bass protection for detailed and accurate sound.“Double-baffle” aluminum enclosure design to minimize unwanted resonances and coloration.Separate mid-range driver enclosures to eliminate interaction with the bass drivers.Five drive-units powered by a bridged pair of Dynamic Hi-Res amplifiers, each pair capable of delivering over 100 watts into 8 ohms.EBA (Enhanced Bass Alignment) to heighten sound quality across the frequency range, resulting in added clarity.Dynamic bass protection to provide maximum excursion without distortion.Centre Elevation technology to create an immersive sound experience that appears to come from the center of the screen.Meridian’s enhancement technologies, including FIFO buffering, DSP upsampling, apodizing filters and MHR (Meridian High Resolution).The DSP750 delivers a maximum output of 120 decibels and bass extension down to 30 hertz. Its built-in custom tweeter with a beryllium dome and diffraction expansion technology ensures a wide sound dispersion for incredibly lifelike sound, capable of playing over 40 kilohertz. The DSP750 has what Merdian says is superb off-axis performance with two 100-millimeter mid-range drivers, enabling it to produce a uniform and vibrant stereo image over a wide listening area, making it perfect for larger areas.Also, the sealed aluminum cabinet design ensures a reliable and repeatable performance with an ultra-shallow 100-mm mounting depth for easy installation and precise positioning. Users can adjust the rough-in box and frame for various wall materials and depths and can paint the magnetic grille to blend seamlessly into any interior.More information on Meridian Audio loudspeakers is here.last_img read more

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Study: Children, middle-aged most vulnerable to variant H3N2

first_imgAug 10, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – A serologic study from Canada suggests that children and middle-aged adults have little or no immunity to the swine-origin variant H3N2 influenza virus (H3N2v), but about half of adolescents and young adults have some degree of immunity as measured by antibody levels.The researchers also found that seasonal flu vaccines used in the past two seasons did not improve participants’ ability to mount an immune response to H3N2v. Their report was published this week in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.Given the results, “A specific vaccine would be needed in the event A(H3N2)v establishes epidemic spread,” says the study, which was led by Danuta M. Sowronski, MD, of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control as first author.The H3N2v strain, which contains the matrix gene from the 2009 H1N1 virus, emerged last summer in the United States, causing a dozen cases. But more than 150 cases of H3N2v illness have been reported in the past few weeks, most of them in children who had contact with pigs, often at county fairs. The illnesses have generally been mild and self-limiting.A flu expert with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today that the new findings generally agree with those of previous studies by the CDC and others, but the finding of low antibody levels in middle-aged adults emerged more clearly in the new study than in previous ones.The CDC has prepared a candidate vaccine for the novel virus, and clinical trials are expected this fall.Samples from all agesThe Canadian researchers looked for cross-reactive antibodies to H3N2v, using 1,116 serum samples that had been collected in 2010 from people across the age spectrum. In addition, they tested sera collected from children and adults before and after receipt of the 2010-11 seasonal flu vaccine and from elderly people before and after receipt of the 2011-12 vaccine.Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and, in a subset of cases, microneutralization were used to assess antibodies to H3N2v.Overall, 25% of the 1,116 participants had an HI antibody titer of at least 40 to the H3N2v strain, the level that’s believed to confer some degree of protection. But no children younger than 5 years and fewer than 20% of subjects 14 or younger or over age 40 had this seroprotective level of antibody.Between the ages of 14 and 40, half of the subjects had a seroprotective level of antibody to the virus, the report says. The proportion peaked at about 60% in adults in their 20s but dropped to about one-third for those in their 30s. Fewer than 10% of those between ages 40 and 69 and about 20% of those older than 69 had seroprotection.The researchers also looked at cross-reactivity to an H3N2 strain called A/Sydney, which circulated in the late 1990s and was the most closely related and readily available human ancestor strain to H3N2v. Overall, they found a seroprotective level of antibody to A/Sydney in 61% of their samples. More than 90% of teens and adults in their 20s had seroprotection, and for adults overall the prevalence was more than 60%.To test whether seasonal flu vaccine enhanced protection against H3N2v, the team looked for at least a fourfold increase in antibodies to the novel virus (seroconversion) after vaccination. They found that seroconversion rates were less than 15% in all age and vaccine groups, with little difference by age-group.Among elderly people who received the 2011-12 seasonal vaccine, 72 received a vaccine containing the MF59 adjuvant. The researchers said the adjuvanted vaccine didn’t enhance response to H3N2v compared with the other formulations.”Our serologic findings suggest substantial protection against A(H3N2)v in late adolescence and young adulthood, but broad susceptibility in children and older adults,” the authors say in summary.The lack of protective antibody levels in middle-aged and older adults contrasts oddly with the fact that there was only one adult among the first 13 H3N2v cases identified, the authors comment. They say this “may reflect limitations in surveillance sensitivity, exposure opportunities or pediatric versus adult hygiene or other protective measures.”The explanation for the age-related variation in seroprotection may have to do with differences in the H3N2 strains that different age-groups were exposed to in childhood, the researchers suggest. They say that the A/Sydney strain circulated a few years after, and is 96.4% similar to, H3N2v’s closest human ancestor, A/Wuhan.Those who were children in the 1990s may have been “primed” by exposure to H3N2v ancestor strains, resulting in robust memory responses to related strains in later years, they write.The authors note several limitations of their data and say the findings need confirmation elsewhere.A CDC expert, Jacqueline Katz, PhD, said the Canadian findings generally agree with previous smaller studies conducted by her agency and a group in Norway. But she said the study is much larger and offers greater insight into the age-related differences in seroprotection against H3N2v. Katz is chief of the immunology and pathogenesis branch of the CDC’s Influenza Division.”Overall, the three studies agree that there is negligible cross-reactive antibody to the H3N2v virus detected in younger children,” Katz said. The work also confirms previous findings that seasonal trivalent flu vaccine containing an H3N2 strain does not trigger much of a cross-reactive response to the novel virus, she added.”What’s novel about Skowronski’s study is it’s the largest to date and had the ability to look more closely at different age groups,” she said. “They have quite an interesting finding that middle-aged adults, ages 40 to 69, show a substantial reduction in the level of cross-reactive antibody compared with younger adults.”The Norwegian study had a similar finding, but in a tighter age-group of adults, she said, adding that further research is warranted to try to find an explanation for the phenomenon.Katz concurred with the Canadian team’s suggestion that different childhood exposures may be a reason for the age-related differences in seroprotection.”It may be that that particular group [middle-aged adults] had a different exposure, that they saw an earlier H3N2 virus for the first time, and didn’t have the same robustness of response to the viruses from the 1990s that are closest to the H3N2v strain,” she said. “We’re interested in looking into that a little more.””When you do genetic and antigenic analysis, you can see that viruses from the early 1990s are genetically most closely related to the hemagglutinin of the H3N2 variant viruses,” Katz said. “So it does make sense that individuals who were of an age to be exposed to those in the early 1990s and made a robust response may have the highest cross-reactive antibody response to the variant strain.”Skowronski D, Janjua NZ, De Serres G, et al. Cross-reactive and vaccine-induced antibody to emerging swine influenza A(H3N2)v. J Infect Dis 2012 (Early online publication) [Full text] [Abstract]last_img read more

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NEXUS Adds Further Weight To Its Heavy-Duty Focus With Appointment Of Senior Business Developer

first_imgAdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementNEXUS Automotive International (N!) has strengthened its support for the heavy-duty sector with the senior appointment of Janusz Zielinski as the alliance’s first truck business developer.Zielinski, a native of Poland, has more than 20 years of experience in the international automotive aftermarket, particularly in commercial vehicles in Europe, the Middle East and Africa with global manufacturers Meritor and Schaeffler.NEXUS has recently increased its heavy-duty focus, unveiling initiatives to accelerate the growth of the NEXUSTRUCK workshop concept while also seeking more generally to build business for all its suppliers and members.A major task for Zielinski in his new role will be to guide the establishment of the first NEXUS Heavy-Duty Business Forum (N!BF Heavy Duty), which will take place in Abu Dhabi in March.Gael Escribe, CEO of NEXUS, said, “Heavy-duty is an important segment of the aftermarket and we are already achieving considerable success. The NEXUSTRUCK network is well established in Spain and Portugal and our inaugural N!Workshop event in Madrid was well attended by N! members from North America, the Middle East, Europe and Africa. We are delighted to have someone of such high caliber as Janusz joining NEXUS as our first dedicated Truck Business Developer. His experience will be invaluable as we seek to develop even more opportunities in Heavy Duty for our N! members and suppliers.”AdvertisementA qualified ski instructor and Alfa Romeo classic car enthusiast, Zielinski speaks English, German, Polish and Russian. Commenting on his new post, he said, “Having had some experience of NEXUS in my previous posting, I know it to be the most dynamic and forward-thinking international trading group in the world. It’s a role and a challenge that excites me.”Today’s N! heavy-duty community is made up of 42 N! members and 47 heavy-duty parts suppliers, with a collective turnover of more than 3,300M€ ($3,775M U.S.), covering 20 percent of N! volumes.last_img read more

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