GOrilla gets fancy with Swiss lugged track Nash and Kashimax saddles

first_imgGOrilla urban cycling is a mostly utilitarian bike company based in Zurich, and even though most of their frames are Italian-made they manage to still be pretty reasonably priced. A lot of that is a result of a pared down aesthetic with basic paint and the desire to keep things simple that leans them towards a lot of fixed-geared or internally-geared hub city bikes. But that is thrown out the window with the Swiss-made retro-lugged Nash track frameset. Spin past the break for a closer look… Gorilla’s first lugged track frame, the bike takes its name from a limited run of the Nash lugset from the 1970s. The frame is then built with traditional road Columbus tubing, brazed in Zürich and finished in Berne. The Nash lugs feature some pretty unique shapes with a large hexagonal bottom bracket shell and flat sides on the seat lug that provide a nice base for some GOrilla-branding engraving. The bike sticks with a 1″ threadless fork with a matching rounded point crown, a BSA bottom bracket, and 27.2mm seatpost. The 2750 CHF (~2500€/$2750) Nash frameset comes in standard geometry, but is made to order so does offer a good bit of customization like sizing (within the lugs range), rear spacing, and braze-ons. It also uses a brake bridge and a drilled crown to keep city riding functionality and the ability to run brakes. Frames are around 1750g painted, with another 850g for the fork with Campagnolo fork tips.If a GOrilla sounds nice, but the Nash is too steep, their standard Italian-welded Hattara frameset is a more reasonable 845 CHF (~780€/$850).Gorilla also recently teased us with news of a collaboration with Japanese saddle maker Kashima. The GOrilla x Kashimax deal could bring a bit better access to the sought after saddles at least in Europe. We don’t have many details, other than to say that three shapes of the classically padded saddles are expected to be available including the Aero (AX), the self named Kashimax (KX), and what may be the FiveGold (FG), each one in several of the almost 70 standard covers of the long running Japanese saddle maker.GOrillaBicycles.comlast_img read more

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IB13: First Look – Full Easton Dream Bike Raffle Line Up

first_imgThe Black Cat is a gorgeous steel bike out of their shop in Aptos, CA. Built with an integrated lower cup and external upper cup, the headtube stands out. The matte grey paint highlights Black Cat’s typically stellar paint work. The Hunter Cycles steel bike offers a classy understated look with classic lines. After recently announcing the Easton Dream Bike Charity Raffle, they kicked things off with the first give away – the Calfee Manta Pro. While the rest of the bikes will be raffled off one a month after the Calfee. Easton had the whole line on display including this beautiful Black Cat. Full details about each model will be announced later, but for now jump past the break to check out the bikes from Caletti, Hunter, and Rock Lobster as well! The Caletti ti bike is as usual an exquisite frame out of his work shop off the back of his house. Finally, this awesome mint green Rock Lobster alloy race machine rounds things out. More details on the bikes and the charities they will support as we get it!last_img read more

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DC Cancer Moonshot Summit participant gives keynote at Vermont pharmacy college white coat ceremony

first_imgAlbany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences – Vermont Campus,Vermont Business Magazine Dr Sarah Scarpace Peters, PharmD, MPH, BCOP, gave the keynote address at the Vermont campus of the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (ACPHS) white coat ceremony for incoming Doctor of Pharmacy students last week. Peters was among the 300 individuals invited by the Office of Vice President Joe Biden to participate in the Cancer Moonshot(link is external) summit held earlier this year in Washington, DC. In addition to her faculty role at ACPHS, she is President of the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), a national association that seeks to optimize the care of individuals affected by cancer.“It’s an honor to talk with new students about how the role of pharmacist has grown exponentially in the last 20 years, and how as medication safety experts they will have a tremendous impact on preventing hospital readmissions,” Peters said. “Pharmacists are not just behind the counter, but work closely with physicians and employ strategies to help patients’ adherence to medication therapies.”The White Coat Ceremony is held annually for first year Doctor of Pharmacy students. During the ceremony, students are presented with their white coats by members of the faculty. The ceremony concludes with the students reciting the Pledge of Professionalism.“Presentation of the white coat is an outward sign that symbolizes their internal transformation from pharmacy student to student pharmacist,” noted Dr. Robert Hamilton, Pharm.D., MPH, Interim Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.Pictured here are the Vermont PharmD students who have just received their white coats. Students attending ACPHS’s Vermont campus are from 20+ states across the US, and numerous countries including China, Philippines, Vietnam, Korea, Nigeria, Ghana, Canada, and Trinidad and Tobago.Albany College of Pharmacy and Health SciencesFounded in 1881, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is a private, independent institution with a long tradition of academic and research excellence. Ranked #1 value-added college in the country(link is external), ACPHS is committed to educating the next generation of leaders in the health care professions and translating scientific discoveries into therapies that benefit humankind. The College opened its Colchester Campus in 2009; it remains the only Doctor of Pharmacy program in the state of Vermont. The school’s main campus is located in Albany, New York. For more information about ACPHS, visit us at www.acphs.edu(link is external) or Facebook(link is external).Source: August 30, 2016 (Colchester, VT) – Albany College of Pharmacylast_img read more

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Phelps Brand Ninja Goggles now available worldwide

first_imgPhelps Brand, the global swim brand from Michael Phelps and Aqua Sphere, has announced that its all-new Ninja competition goggle is now available worldwide.‘The latest evolution of the Phelps Brand’s top-of-the-line competitive racing goggle, the Ninja offers swimmers the ultimate high-performance racing goggle on the market with patented frame technology and a hydrodynamic low-profile fit.’“The Ninja is a goggle I wish I had when I was competing because of its low-profile design and superior visibility,” said Michael Phelps. “I especially love that they are super lightweight and it’s easy to set to your preferred size, providing overall comfort in the water.”The Ninja goggle features a patented ‘set it and forget it’ strap system. This claims to offer swimmers a hassle-free experience so they can ‘simply set the strap once and focus on swimming fast.’Additional features include:Curved lens technology and titanium mirrored lens treatmentAnti-fog treated lenses that are made from polycarbonate ‘which is 10 times stronger and 100 times lighter than glass’Four interchangeable nose bridge optionsUV protection and durable anti-scratch treatment.The Ninja is FINA-approved and available for purchase michaelphelps.com.“The genesis of Phelps Brand is in our swim goggles and we’re proud of the Ninja’s unrivalled sleek hydrodynamics, visibility and comfort,” said Andrew Gritzbaugh, General Manager of North America for Aqua Lung, the parent company of Phelps Brand and Aqua Sphere.“Our goal is to limit distractions for swimmers, giving them the freedom to focus purely on racing.”Made in Italy with Aqua Sphere technology, Phelps Brand develops a range of products – from training equipment to performance swimsuits for competitive swimmers under the direction of Michael Phelps and Hall of Fame coach Bob Bowman.www.michaelphelps.comwww.AquaSphereSwim.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Providing feedback to judges is now easier

first_imgProviding feedback to judges is now easier November 1, 2009 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Providing feedback to judges is now easier Senior EditorGiving confidential feedback to a judge on his or her performance just got a bit easier, and the committee that oversees the program is hoping more lawyers and judges will be encouraged to use it.The Florida Bar’s Web site now has a quick links function at the upper right- hand section of the page under “Member Tools.” Moving the cursor over the “Quick Links” tab produces an instant menu that includes links to information and several Bar services, including Judicial Feedback. That program has been run by the Judicial Administration and Evaluation Program for the past 11 years.As the Web site describes it, the program gives lawyers “a confidential means by which attorney members of The Florida Bar can communicate to appellate or trial court judges they have appeared before concerning perceived specific strengths and weaknesses.“Attorneys are asked to evaluate demeanor, knowledge, fairness, and other factors but not to discuss issues of their specific case.”“For the lawyer, it gives you a forum to express yourself without fear of reprisal, without violating any rules of ex parte communication,” said JAEC Chair Ivan Reich. “It gives them that forum and it does it in a confidential forum.”And judges can receive private input on how they’re doing.“For judges, let’s face it, sometimes judges get insular,” Reich said. “It doesn’t matter what your job is, you can always do better at it.”He emphasized the program is confidential. Lawyers can leave their feedback online, but their identity is shielded from the judge. Likewise, judges are assured under Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.420(c)(4) that the feedback is kept secret unless they themselves choose to disclose the substance to their chief judge or another judge to get peer input about lawyer observations of their performance.“It gives a lawyer a forum without fear of repercussion of saying how he feels,” Reich said. For the judge, “It cannot be used as a tool for some sort of political purpose or backlash.”Ninth Circuit Judge John Kest, immediate past chair of JAEC, is an enthusiastic supporter of the judicial feedback program. When he finishes a case, he includes with the final paperwork sent to lawyers instructions on the program.“For judges who use it, it’s a wonderful, helpful thing. It provides feedback not only about the judge and how you can improve, but also your assistant, your clerk, and the judicial system,” he said. “From the lawyer’s viewpoint, you’ve got an opportunity to provide feedback about the operation of the legal system.”It’s a particularly valuable tool for new judges, Kest said, because they can see where they “are doing things wrong and don’t even know they’re doing things wrong.”He likened it to many typical employment evaluations, except, he noted, “Instead of having your boss saying ‘Hey, you screwed up,’ wouldn’t it be nice to get confidential feedback?”Kest said he gets lots of feedback, which he reads, because he sends out reminders when a case ends. But he said mostly the system remains underused.“It’s just not being used enough, either by the judges or the practitioners,” he said. “It’s a vicious circle. The lawyers need to be giving the feedback, and the judges need to be checking for the feedback. But the judges have to be reminding the lawyers the system is there.”Lawyers wishing to leave feedback and judges wanting to check for responses can access the system through the Quick Links menu on the Bar’s homepage. Users must have a Bar Web site password and their attorney number to access the program.last_img read more

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The clock is ticking; Clemency Project volunteers needed now

first_img September 1, 2015 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News The clock is ticking; Clemency Project volunteers needed now One clemency case, profiled in the Sun Sentinel, is a Broward County woman named Valarie Bozeman aka Theresa Brown. Now a 48-year-old mother and grandmother who served more than 20 years, she was sentenced in 1993 to mandatory life in prison for conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine, an enhanced penalty because she had prior state drug convictions.Her defense at trial was that she was mentally and physically abused by the leader of the drug gang and she only played a minor role. U.S. District Judge Ursula Ungaro, the trial and sentencing judge, advocated for her early release, according to her defense team.Federal Public Defender Michael Caruso, in the Southern District of Florida, said Bozeman “shrieked with joy” when he called to tell her Obama had given her a reprieve. He described her as a “very, very small-time street-level dealer” struggling with her own addiction and then got involved with an abusive big-time dealer. In prison, she worked as a chaplain’s clerk, data processor, and call center employee through UNICOR, a government corporation that uses prison labor to provide services and produce goods.“This is a woman who is completely reformed. She is ecstatic that she can get back to South Florida. She just wants to be reunited with her family and be a productive member of society,” Caruso told the Sun Sentinel. King has also represented defendants in federal court who had two relatively minor prior offenses and were looking at life in prison. She has had conversations with judges who admit they went back to chambers and wiped away tears because they believed the harsh sentences imposed were wrong.“As a lawyer, we expect to have an impact on our clients. In the world of criminal defense, however, there are often bad days, days you don’t ever forget over the course of your career. You remember each one,” King said.“The cases which haunt me are the ones where there was, literally, nothing more I could do. There was nothing the judge could do. To stand next to a client and hear the judge lament the fact that he or she must impose a life sentence on a nonviolent drug offender due to sentencing guidelines, and nothing more, leaves a mark.” Tying Judges’ Hands The clock is ticking; Clemency Project volunteers needed now Senior EditorWhat do Valarie Bozeman of Pompano Beach, Nathaniel Brown of Orange Park, Mark Anthony Jones of Boynton Beach, Roy Larry Lee of St. Petersburg, Marlon McNealy of St. Petersburg, and Jeffrey Jerome Toler of Pensacola have in common? All are Floridians sentenced to life in federal prison for cocaine convictions, and President Obama commuted their sentences so they can be freed.What do the Koch Brothers, civil rights activist Van Jones, the American Civil Liberties Union, Americans for Tax Reform, the NAACP, and Newt Gingrich all have in common?They are what President Obama calls “unlikely bedfellows” in agreeing with his actions to free such nonviolent federal inmates. The bipartisan effort aims to undo the draconian war-on-drugs sentences of the recent decades and reduce America’s overcrowded prisons and jails that keep 2.2 million people behind bars at a cost of $80 billion a year, according to Obama.So far, Obama has commuted the sentences of 89 nonviolent drug offenders who have served at least 10 years in federal prison, have no significant prior convictions, and have demonstrated good conduct in prison — men and women whose sentences, if imposed today, would be much shorter.Each one received a personal letter from Obama that said: “I am granting your application because you have demonstrated the potential to turn your life around. Now it is up to you to make the most of the opportunity.”More than 30,000 have sought relief, but the clock is ticking to review petitions and get those who meet the criteria to Washington, D.C., by January 20, 2016, in order to give the Obama administration a year to consider them and get them to the president before his term ends.The Clemency Project 2014 — a working group of lawyers and advocates including the Federal Defenders, ACLU, Families Against Mandatory Minimums, the ABA, and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers — is racing against the clock to screen and file the clemency petitions.One volunteer recruiter is Nellie L. King, a criminal defense attorney in West Palm Beach, who serves on the board of NACDL, is a past president of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and sits on the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission.She urges Florida lawyers — regardless if you have any experience in criminal law — to join in this massive pro bono effort.“I believe lawyers can most effectively represent their clients by involving themselves in efforts which improve the system and impart change for the people we serve,” King said. “For me, sitting on the sidelines is not an option.“As a member of The Florida Bar, Clemency Project 2014 represents a way for all of us to stand for something. I am passionate about the clemency initiative announced by the White House, and lawyers who participate in this endeavor are making history.“It is, simply stated, the right thing to do.”Shrieking With Joy Federal Public Defender Randy Murrell, in the Northern District of Florida, also knows the frustration of representing nonviolent drug offenders facing life sentences. He gave the example of a crack cocaine case, where the defendant had two minor drug offenses and then sold $15 worth of crack to an undercover agent and gets charged in federal court. With enhancements to sentences for prior drug convictions, he said, that defendant would be sentenced to life.“Everyone had a sense it wasn’t right. Judges felt like their hands were tied and didn’t have any choice,” Murrell said.“North Florida is a little unique in that we had some of the harshest sentences in the country. One of the reasons is that the longest sentences were the product of these drug enhancements, if you had a prior felony drug conviction. In most places in the country, it was relatively rare and was reserved for the more aggravating cases.“But in North Florida, they filed a drug enhancement in every case. And, as a matter of policy, we don’t have plea negotiations in North Florida.”At first, Murrell said, he thought his office could file the clemency petitions. But the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts said the federal public defenders do not have that authority.“But a lot of us volunteered to review cases and we pass that information on to the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers,” Murrell said. “I do think they are having difficulty getting enough lawyers. It’s gotten to be a big project.”Murrell was busy going through a list of 90 cases where his office originally represented the defendants, and trying to finish by the end of August.Defense attorney George Blow, who has represented drug defendants in the Northern District, said, “I have heard judges remark in court, ‘This is what I would do if my hands weren’t tied.’ They would flat out announce that on the record.”He said he had a client with one prior conviction for possession of “a miniscule amount of pot” in state court and got probation. But that was enough to trigger 10 or 20 years of minimum mandatory in federal court.In 2010, Obama signed the Fair Sentencing Act that reduced the disparity for harsher sentences for crack cocaine than powder cocaine, but the president said much more needs to be done to undo past injustices.“The United States is home to 5 percent of the world’s population, but 25 percent of the world’s prisoners. Think about that. Our incarceration rate is four times higher than China’s. We keep more people behind bars than the top 35 European countries combined,” Obama said at the NAACP conference in Philadelphia in July.“Murderers, predators, rapists, gang leaders, and drug kingpins” need to stay locked up, the president said, but nonviolent drug offenders do not deserve sentences of 20 years to life.“Over the last few decades, we’ve also locked up more and more nonviolent drug offenders than ever before, for longer than ever before. And that is the real reason our prison population is so high. In far too many cases, the punishment simply does not fit the crime. If you’re a low-level drug dealer, or you violate your parole, you owe some debt to society.“You have to be held accountable and make amends. But you don’t owe 20 years. You don’t owe a life sentence. That’s disproportionate to the price that should be paid,” Obama said.King is hoping to recruit and help train volunteers for the Clemency Project that would help correct unfair punishments levied in the past for at least some defendants, if not all.“This Clemency Project represents a form of redemptive legal practice which will leave a huge impact on the inmates we aid, as well as foster long-term, systemic change,” King said. “We can take those bad days back and right the wrongs of the past. And if not now, when?” To volunteer, go to www.clemencyproject2014.org and click on the Volunteers link. If you have additional questions, contact atto rne y Nellie L. King at www.criminaldefensefla.com .last_img read more

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Benevolent billionaires – why do they do it?

first_imgThe Sydney Morning Herald:They have been hailed as the billion-dollar givers by Forbes in a new list of the world’s most benevolent billionaires, but what inspires super-rich people to give most of their money away? Is it guilt, glory or simply the joy of giving?Topping the 23-strong list is Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who according to Forbes has so far given nearly half of his $US66 billion ($A63.5 billion) fortune away. His outlook on life seems to be a motivating factor.“We are impatient optimists by nature: we see the glass as ‘half full’ and are motivated to confront problems that others consider impossible to solve,” his foundation website states.Others, including US magnate Warren Buffett, who has donated $17 billion to date, and Rams Home Loans founder John Kinghorn, who has donated $300 million, have said they don’t want to leave their children disablingly rich.Read the whole story: The Sydney Morning HeraldThey have been hailed as the billion-dollar givers by Forbes in a new list of the world’s most benevolent billionaires, but what inspires super-rich people to give most of their money away? Is it guilt, glory or simply the joy of giving?Topping the 23-strong list is Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who according to Forbes has so far given nearly half of his $US66 billion ($A63.5 billion) fortune away. His outlook on life seems to be a motivating factor.“We are impatient optimists by nature: we see the glass as ‘half full’ and are motivated to confront problems that others consider impossible to solve,” his foundation website states.Others, including US magnate Warren Buffett, who has donated $17 billion to date, and Rams Home Loans founder John Kinghorn, who has donated $300 million, have said they don’t want to leave their children disablingly rich.Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/culture/benevolent-billionaires–why-do-they-do-it-20121122-29sjs.html#ixzz2DWncnqRdlast_img read more

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Five reasons why we (eventually) become happier as we get older

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook They are also the biggest consumers of the self-help industry, spending their money on well-being retreats, travelling, online happiness-boosting activities or pop psychology books. Ironically, research shows that the pursuit of happiness might not only make us less happy, but also more lonely, as we often end up cutting ourselves off from people who represent the lives that we want to leave behind.So, if we are feeling unhappy today, can we hope for a better tomorrow? Fortunately, research suggests that we can, because regardless of our individual differences, we go through some natural changes in life that influence our happiness. These changes allow us to experience relatively high levels of happiness in our 20s, which then begin to tumble, reaching their lowest point in the late 30s and early 40s – when they start to climb again.There are five reasons for this natural upturn.1. Time perspectiveIn most Western societies, we tend to spend our 20s and 30s creating our future. By our late 30s and early 40s, when we realise that a) we have not achieved what we hoped to achieve, and b) our future is shrinking rapidly, we have two options. We can begin to panic, or we can adjust to all these changes by redirecting our thoughts to the positive past. This is what most of us do, which results in us feeling more secure and happier, as we move into the later stages of our lives.2. Emotional lifeWhen we are young, we let our emotions run wild. The higher they go, the lower they drop. It takes us years to control them. As we move into our 50s, they become more stable and we begin to achieve more serenity in life. Apart from that, we are more drawn to positivity and are able to hold on to it for longer, which is another reason why we feel happier as we age.3. Social networkIn our 20s, our social network is likely to be thriving. We have new people coming into our lives all the time, be it colleagues from a new job, or the extra circles of friends and family of a new romantic partner. Then, as we enter our 30s, it all begins to change. We no longer have the time nor the energy to nurture all our friendships, and people drop from our lives like flies.Since we need social support to feel happier, this change can have a detrimental effect on our well-being. However, as we move into our 50s, older and wiser, we begin to put more effort into the people in our lives, strengthening our friendships. This can be another reason why we become happier later on in our lives.4. Life eventsLife events are like traffic. When the road is empty, it is easier to drive. As soon as it becomes busy, it is harder to cope. Research shows that both traumatic events and daily hassles are at their highest level when we reach midlife. Thereafter, they begin to slow down, as we learn how to cope with them more effectively. And we become happier as a result.5. PredictabilityIt feels good to be able to predict what is going to happen next. It gives us a sense of mastery over our environment and fills us with the confidence that we can tackle anything that life throws at us. As we move along the years, we become better at foreseeing the consequences of our, and other people’s, behaviours and become skilled at planning the best action to manoeuvre through life challenges. Each day teaches us new life skills – and they make it easier for us to feel happier.So it seems our lives do become happier as we age. Ironically, regardless of our age, when people are asked about the happiest times of their lives, they usually point to their 20s, wrongly predicting that feelings of contentment will reduce as they get older.In fact, it would be a good idea to relax and let nature take its course. Because with things actually improving with age, the uplifting truth is that we all have an ever-increasing chance of living happily ever after.By Jolanta Burke, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of East LondonThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Share LinkedIncenter_img Happiness has become a modern obsession. Searching for it, holding on to it, and wishing it on our loved ones have all become motivating forces for how we live our lives.We also use happiness as a measuring stick for life decisions. If a job doesn’t make us happy, we quit it. If a relationship stops making us happy, we leave it.Happiness has lodged itself at the centre of our lives and we make some drastic choices desperately trying to reach it. This is especially true for people in their 30s and 40s, who are at the highest risk of using antidepressants and developing mood disorders than any other age group. Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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CARICOM/CSME: The Persisting Implementation Question

first_img CSME Implementation This week’s 40th Conference of Heads will be focusing on the implementation of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). You will recall that Jamaica’s Golding Report, the 2017 Report of the Commission to Review Jamaica’s Relations within the CARICOM and CARIFORUM Framework, led the Community to reflect on the protracted and unbalanced implementation of the CSME at the 39th Heads Conference held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 July 2018. CSME implementation has been in progress since the Revised Treaty of Chaguramas was adopted in 2002, 17 years ago. Arising from the Montego Bay Conference, a Special Heads Meeting was convened in December 2018 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, focusing specifically on the CSME and resulting in the adoption of the St. Ann Declaration. The 30th Intersessional Meeting of the CARICOM Heads held in St. Kitts/Nevis in February 2019 addressed progress in CSME implementation. Former Jamaica Prime Minister Bruce Golding sits on a panel which discusses his Report at a 2018 Meeting on the CSME The CARICOM Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) has responsibility for implementing the CSME. The 48th COTED Meeting was held in Georgetown, Guyana, April 29-30, and, as expected, CSME implementation was a key agenda item. On this, I took particular note of the opening remarks made by the CARICOM Secretary General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque. I quote from these remarks as follows: “In a little over two months our Heads of Government will be expecting to receive a report card that indicates that the mandates laid out last July in Montego Bay; in Port-of-Spain last December; and in Frigate Bay last February have been fulfilled. Priorities were identified by the Leaders and an Implementation Plan agreed upon. Member States recommitted fully to the effective implementation of the CSME and agreed to the timelines – short, medium and long-term – set by the Plan. This [COTED] Meeting presents an opportunity to review the actions taken by Member States to meet the timelines so that there could be an assessment of our progress. Implementation cannot be a shifting target. We cannot come to meeting after meeting and agree to a Plan and not carry forward the work. An urgency to complete the agreed measures and make the CSME a lived reality for our citizens, has been the hallmark of the recent discussions among our Heads of Government.  As the Council tasked under the Revised Treaty to “promote the development and oversee the operation of the CSME” you have a pivotal role to play in ensuring that we accomplish the goals in that regard.” Oct 14, 2020 Sep 23, 2020 Trade-in-Services and Technology: More missed opportunities… CARICOM Day        On July 1, Guyana and possibly a few other Member States of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) commemorated CARICOM Day marking the signing on July 4, 1973 of the Treaty of Chaguaramas creating the Caribbean Community and Common Market. It seems the day is usually marked on the first Monday in July. Member States decided that this day should be commemorated to recall the creation of CARICOM and provide an opportunity for public education and reflection on achievements, challenges and the way forward. The CARICOM Conference of Heads of Government is customarily convened to coincide with the actual signing date. This year, the 40th Conference of Heads of Government is being held in St. Lucia, July 3-5. The commemoration of CARICOM Day across the region, or lack of it, illustrates the general difficulty with implementation. The decision was taken, but only a few Members States and regional institutions actually implement it demonstrating their commitment to the Community which they founded. Oct 7, 2020 Relations within the Western Hemisphere: an uneasy alliance Oct 1, 2020 CARICOM Trade Ministers begin two-day meeting in Guyana on Thursday44th COTED Officials 9 May 2017 from Caribbean Community on Vimeo. The CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) will be one of the main areas of focus when Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Ministers with responsibility for Trade meet in Georgetown, Guyana, Thursday and Friday. In preparation for the two-day Ministerial Meeting,…May 10, 2017In “CARICOM”Trinidad accords special priority to CARICOM – PM wants security, CSME on forefrontPrime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, Dr, The Hon. Keith Rowley, on Monday said that his country’s continued commitment to CARICOM has precipitated the refocusing of the ministry with responsibility for foreign policy, to the Ministry of Foreign and CARICOM Affairs. Delivering his maiden address to the Conference at the…July 5, 2016In “Anguilla”Statement – Prime Minister Rowley to Parliament on CSMEConceived as an instrument to facilitate economic development, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Single Market and Economy (CSME) is the manifestation of the intent to deepen the integration process that began with the signing of the Treaty of Chaguaramas in 1973.  That Treaty was later revised and the Community is now…December 12, 2018In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp Trade in Services – For CARICOM, Tourism dominates You may be interested in… The Secretary General was clear; Member States must demonstrate their commitment to implementing the CSME by their actions. He reminded the Ministers of the challenges currently existing globally which CARICOM’s small economies must face head on. Progress in CSME Implementation Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley has lead responsibility for CSME It seems that Prime Minister Mia Mottley of Barbados, who has responsibility for the CSME, is committed to making progress. She has been endeavouring to have action taken on CSME decisions both at the national and regional levels. The Prime Minister has particular interest in engaging with the regional private sector and labour representatives as set out in the St. Ann Declaration. The Caribbean Congress of Labour already exist. The challenge is organizing the regional private sector. PM Mottley has met with sector representatives to advance engagement and encourage organization. The Network of Caribbean Chambers of Commerce (CARICHAM) was formed in April. The Caribbean Association of Industry and Commerce (CAIC) still exist in some form. There are a number of product specific regional private sector organizations. The Caribbean Business Council (CBC), which could be an umbrella body, still remains a work in progress after 13 years. The St. Ann Declaration envisages a private sector body as an associate institution of CARICOM and a key player in the CSME. The onus is on the regional private sector to find an acceptable structure from which to engage with CARICOM and in other regional and international trade matters. I am hoping the performance appraisal for the CSME to be presented to CARICOM Heads in St. Lucia will demonstrate through action a genuine commitment to implementation and problem-solving among CARICOM Heads and Ministers, particularly those in the CSME. I await the Communique. Maybe next year, CARICOM Day will be marked by all Member States signaling their renewed commitment to the Community and implementation of their decisions. Submitted by Elizabeth Morgan, Specialist in International Trade Policy and International Politics Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM Competition Authorities encouraged to co-operate last_img read more

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Building regs is the right place for housing standards

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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