Barton Hills Choir Performs Grateful Dead Classics Remotely With Special Guests [Watch]

first_imgThe Barton Hills Choir congregated online to sing a couple of Grateful Dead tunes this past weekend, where they got a little help from some familiar faces. The Austin, TX-based children’s choir sang “Going Down The Road Feeling Bad” and “I Know You Rider” digitally with each other on Friday.The ensemble was joined by Josh Rosen (Shakedown Street), Adam Roberts (Rock And Roll Playhouse), and Robert Koritz (Dark Star Orchestra). In addition to the talented group of 4th–6th graders, the Barton Hills Choir also features guitarist Don “El Cento” Cento, bassist Jason “Mr. Boom Boom” Brint, drummer Jake “Mr. Bubbles” Perlman, and percussionist Aaron Dembe.Related: Naugatuck High School Percussion Ensemble Plays Medley Of Phish Songs At Winter Showcase [Video]The video starts with just the adult musicians laying down the rhythm before they are quickly joined by the 13 children in the choir. Even while they aren’t singing yet, the kids, clad in matching tie-dyed shirts, provide some animated hand motions while the adults build up the familiar melody. The choir comes in on “GDTRFB” with the smooth high falsetto that only pre-pubescent children, or mid-1960s Bob Weir, can attain. While Rosen’s guitar solos aren’t exactly the length most Deadheads are accustomed to, they allow the children to provide well-placed backup vocals. Without missing a beat, the kids flawlessly transition into “Rider” to take the song, and viewer’s hearts, home.Watch the Barton Hills Choir perform “Going Down The Road Feeling Bad” and “I Know You Rider” from the Grateful Dead catalog.Barton Hills Choir — “Going Down The Road Feeling Bad” > “I Know You Rider”This is far from the Barton Hills Choir’s first foray into the Dead and 60’s rock, thanks to director Gavin Tabone. Recently, Tabone has led the choir through renditions “Ripple”, as well as “Octopus’s Garden” by The Beatles and Joni Mitchell‘s “Both Sides Now”. Check out the choir’s Facebook page for any new videos.[H/T Livemusicblog]last_img read more

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CAPTIAN LEROY RUDOLPH KURTZ

first_img He is preceded in death by his parents Robert & Florence Kurtz (Belke); brothers Richard Kurtz of Cleveland, OH; Gene Kurtz of Cleveland, OH and Sister-in Law Helena Kurtz of Cleveland, OHSurvivors include his wife of 48 years, Lydia Ruiz Kurtz, daughter, Karen Kurtz Escobedo and her husband Joe (Mano) Escobedo; two brothers, Lou Kurtz of Cleveland, OH and Earle Kurtz of Grand Haven, MI; Sister-in Law, Shirley Kurtz of Cambridge, OH; three grandchildren, Raina, Reya, and Rafa Escobedo.Funeral services will be at 2:00 PM, Monday June 6, 2016 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves. Burial will follow at Greenlawn Memorial Park.A visitation for family and friends will be held on Sunday evening from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM at the funeral home. In this very random world we live, we were so very blessed to be able to call this amazing individual Dad!  Leroy Rudolph Kurtz was born during the depression March 12, 1927, an 8th grade education,  lived in an orphanage type “work camp” after loosing his mother to a sudden illness during childhood,  hitchhiking his way to interviews, he began his career in the shipping industry at 17 and climbed the proverbial ladder to the top.  He was a Captain for Lykes Brothers shipping company before joining the elite Sabine Pilots group in Groves, TX, residing with his family nearby.  He was 89 when he passed away on June 1, 2016 and will be missed by all!last_img read more

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Yowch! Prices Announced for London 2012 Olympic Track Cycling Events

first_imgLondon 2012 Velodrome impression (picture credit – London 2012)Y’all better start putting the pennies away if you’re hoping to grab a ticket for track cycling events at the London 2012 Olympic Games. The organisers have clearly marked track cycling events as a big attraction for the games and have priced accordingly. The most expensive tickets will be £325 ($520), for the best seats at the final, while the cheapest will be a not inconsiderable £50 ($80).It’s not altogether surprising: track cycling was dominated by the UK in Beijing, and is one of the host country’s stated targets this time around. But with the Aussies so strong (particularly at the recently finished Commonwealth Games, where they won 12 of the 14 available golds), and US talent Taylor Phinney (hopefully) taking to the boards, even for the unbiased, it looks like one of 2012’s highlights.Ticket’s aren’t yet available, but you can sign up here http://www.tickets.london2012.com/ to register your interest in purchasing one when they go on sale next MarchAnd, for those of you who prefer your cycling events free, try coming to watch the road race on Surrey’s famous Box Hill – the road race will only be ticketed near the end, on the Mall in front of Buckingham Palace, organisers say.Or stay at home and watch from the vélo chair!Big thanks to road.cc for the heads-up.last_img read more

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NAFCU looks ahead to changing Congress

first_imgFor most of us, the biggest immediate change in our lives after the midterm elections has been the end of the constant barrage of political ads every time we turn on our TVs. While we enjoy our brief break before the presidential campaigns ramp up, I wanted to take this opportunity to discuss what else has changed and what those changes mean for the advocacy work we do at NAFCU for our member credit unions.First of all, one thing that hasn’t changed is our strong support in Congress. NAFCU’s political action committee (NAFCU/PAC) participated in more than 100 campaigns for candidates and members of Congress who support credit union issues; as of now, 93 percent of the candidates we supported won their elections. That’s great news for credit unions.Before the 114th Congress gets going next year, we still have some time left with this Congress, now termed a “lame-duck” session. Our main priorities are to help push a number of important measures over the last hurdles. Among these is S. 2698, the “Regulatory Easement for Lending Institutions that Enable a Vibrant Economy (RELIEVE) Act,” which would ensure credit unions parity with FDIC-insured institutions concerning deposit insurance coverage on Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOLTAs). We’re also pressing for final passage of S. 635, the “Privacy Notice Modernization Act,” to eliminate redundant annual privacy notice requirements. In addition, we’ll continue to focus on raising awareness about the lack of federal data security standards for retailers and several other key regulatory relief items such as capital reform, the easing of mortgage rules and tax reform.NAFCU is working with urgency given the limited time left in the 113th Congress, but we are prepared to keep pushing for action as the next Congress takes over. Our five-point plan for regulatory relief continues to be at the top of our advocacy list, especially as it relates to data security. As holiday shopping ads fill up the airtime just recently vacated by political ads, we can’t forget how important it is to hold retailers to account and insist they protect consumers’ financial data.In terms of specific midterm wins impacting credit unions this year, two members of the House Financial Services Committee are making the move to the Senate: Rep. Gary Peters, D-Mich., and Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va. Capito, the first woman ever elected to the Senate from West Virginia, was a lead cosponsor of legislation that would have rolled back the Durbin interchange amendment, and Peters has been a vocal supporter of raising the member business lending cap and preserving the credit union corporate tax exemption. Both members will make strong additions to the Senate.There were losses for us this time around as well: a strong credit union friend, Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., chief sponsor of S. 968, the “Small Business Lending Enhancement Act,” which would life the member business lending cap, lost his reelection bid. However, Sen.-elect Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who will replace him, has a track record of working with credit unions during his time in the House, and we will work with him on behalf of credit unions in Colorado and elsewhere on key issues in the coming year.The 114th Congress will have some distinct challenges. For one, we are likely to see more veto fights now that the Congress and executive branch are controlled by different parties. However those fights play out, they are sure to slow progress in other areas.It is also important to note that one Senate midterm race is still unresolved as of now: Louisiana. Pundits like the odds for Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La., winning his challenge for the seat currently held by Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La.; that race that will continue with a run-off vote on Dec. 6. NAFCU lobbyists will continue to monitor the race’s progress.Another election cycle is (mostly) over, and we at NAFCU have the opportunity to forge relationships with new lawmakers and continue our tradition of strong bipartisan advocacy. As we continue to raise our concerns with the 113th Congress, I encourage NAFCU members and all other credit union supporters to remain engaged with your elected officials: from data security to regulatory relief, there is a lot to do. Whether your legislators are continuing or joining Congress for the first time, make sure the credit union voice is heard. 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Katherine Marisic Katie Marisic became NAFCU’s vice president of political affairs in August 2013. She is responsible for the development, implementation and execution of NAFCU’s political programs, including its PAC … Web: www.nafcu.org Detailslast_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Cholera aid, norovirus in nursing homes, ricin vaccine patent, universal flu vaccine, virus sensor

first_imgNov 23, 2010PAHO: Cholera outbreak outpacing aid donationsHealth officials responding to Haiti’s cholera outbreak recently put out a plea for $124 million for outbreak response, but so far only 10% of that amount has been delivered, Dr Jon Andrus, deputy director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), said today at a press briefing. Medical groups predict they will need enough medical supplies, equipment, and staffing to treat 400,000 cases over the next year, with about half of the illnesses expected to occur over the next 3 months. Authorities are investigating clusters of cases in new areas, Andrus said, adding, “Cholera is virtually everywhere in the country.” PAHO is doubling its staff in Haiti, though he said civil unrest has confined some workers to their living quarters. According to preliminary data today from Haiti’s health ministry, 60,240 people have been treated for cholera, of whom 25,248 were hospitalized and 1,415 died.Norovirus outbreak hits 129 Illinois nursing-home residentsThree nursing homes in McHenry County, Illinois, have reported 129 people sick with suspected norovirus, according to the Northwest Herald, a county newspaper. Norovirus has been confirmed in 14 of the cases, and 5 people have been hospitalized due to the outbreak, according to the McHenry County Department of Health. Norovirus, which is very contagious, affects the gastrointestinal tract and causes nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, with symptoms typically lasting 1 to 2 days.Nov 22 Northwest Herald storyFirm receives third patent for ricin vaccineSoligenix Inc. of Princeton, N.J., yesterday reported receiving a third patent for its vaccine against ricin, a potent poison that is derived from castor beans and is viewed as a potential biological weapon. The vaccine, called RiVax, contains a recombinant subunit of the A chain of ricin and induces neutralizng antibodies in humans and animals, the company announcement said. The patent covers claims about alteration of sequences in the A chain that affect vascular leak, one of ricin’s toxic effects, the company said. The induced mutations in the A chain eliminate the toxic effects of the molecule without changing its structure. Soligenix received two previous patents, in 2003 and 2005, for defined changes in the molecule. One phase 1 clinical trial of the vaccine has been completed and a second one, involving a more potent formulation, is under way, the company reported. The development of RiVax has been supported by the National Institutes of Health through challenge and cooperative grants to Soligenix and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where the vaccine originated. The second phase 1 trial is being supported by the US Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Orphan Products Development.Nov 22 Soligenix news releaseAustralian ‘universal’ flu vaccine to get clinical trialAn influenza vaccine that was developed in Australia and is described as a potential “universal” flu vaccine will get its first clinical trial in Indonesia, according to an Australian Broadcasting Corp. (ABC) News report today. The vaccine, called Gamma-Flu, was developed at the Australian National University in Canberra and is made by Canberra-based Gamma Vaccines. According to the company, the vaccine consists of a whole flu virus that is inactivated by gamma radiation, which destroys the virus’s genetic material, preventing replication, but leaves its proteins intact. The company said the vaccine stimulates effective cytotoxic T-cell activity that, in mice, protects against different influenza A strains.Nov 23 ABC News storyCompany information on Gamma-Flu vaccineMiniature sensor said to sniff out Ebola, Marburg virusesResearchers at Boston University (BU) say they have developed a biosensor the size of a quarter than can rapidly detect RNA-based viruses such as Ebola and Marburg in blood and other biologic samples, according to a BU press release. The findings were first described in a Nov 5 early online report from Nano Letters. Unlike PCR and ELISA testing, the samples don’t need any preparation such as amplification or fluorescent tagging. Instead, the method uses nanohole arrays that transmit light more strongly at certain wavelengths. Measuring the shifts in resonance frequency can reveal the presence and concentration of virus in the solution. Dr Hatice Altug, assistant professor of engineering at BU, said in the press release that the testing platform can be adapted for point-of-care use to detect a broad range of viral pathogens in limited clinical settings, including defense and homeland security applications.Nov 22 BU press releaseNov 5 Nano Letters abstractlast_img read more

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High noon at Chelsea Barracks

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Hercules-2 project launched

first_imgImage: MAN Diesel & Turbo The Hercules-2 project, a cross-industry initiative led by Wärtsilä, MAN Diesel & Turbo and Winterthur Gas & Diesel to develop basic technologies for use in 2- and 4-stroke marine engines has been officially launched.The Hercules-2 project is aimed at fostering environmentally sustainable and more efficient shipping. It is in line with general European Union policy and is partly funded by the EU, Wärtsilä informed in a statement.Altogether, 32 marine industry partners from 11 different companies, 16 universities, and five research organisations are cooperating in this project, with NTU Athens as coordinator.The R&D efforts focus on four main areas. These are; the application of alternative fuels and the optimisation of fuel flexibility to facilitate seamless switching between different fuels; the development of new materials to support high-temperature component applications; the development of adaptive control methodologies to significantly improve an engine’s performance throughout its life span; and to achieve near-zero emissions via combined, integrated, after-treatment of exhaust gases.The Hercules-2 project is scheduled to run for three years. It represents the follow-up phase of the Hercules R&D programme for large engine technologies, which was originally conceived in 2004 by Wärtsilä and MAN Diesel & Turbo. The Hercules-2 technologies will eventually be employed aboard large ships.last_img read more

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A simple disaster

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Building’s bloomer

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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