Goose Shares “Jive Lee” From Return To The Stage In Yarmouth [Video]

first_imgOn Sunday, Goose released pro-shot video of “Jive Lee” from the band’s performance at Yarmouth Drive-In on September 11th. The band also revived its “Soundboard Sunday” tradition by releasing full audio from the Yarmouth, MA concert on Bandcamp and Nugs.The concert on Cape Cod served as Goose’s return to performing before a live audience for the first time since March 11th. Since emerging from quarantine, the ever-rising jam act has played socially-distanced and drive-in concerts throughout the Northeast. Up next, Goose is off to Legend Valley in Thornville, OH for a concert on October 15th.Related: All Good Presents Adds Hot Tuna, PPPP, Goose, CloZee To ‘Showtime At The Drive-In’ SeriesComing out of “Jive I”, this 12-minute run through the instrumental compendium gets going immediately with help from the recent addition of Jeff Arevalo. With the added texture of his auxiliary percussion, Goose has been able to soar to new heights and this live cut is certainly no exception. From Rick Mitarotonda‘s fiery peaks on guitar to Ben Atkind‘s builds on drums, this song is a paradigm for the band’s ability to come right out of the gate with the kind of energy that made them a household name over the past year.Watch Goose perform “Jive Lee” at the Yarmouth Drive-In on September 11th. Click here to listen to the full soundboard recordings on either Bandcamp or Nugs.Goose – “Jive Lee” – Yarmouth, MA – 9/11/20[Video: Goose]last_img read more

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Holy Cross outlines safety precautions for fall semester

first_imgIn a Thursday email to the student body, Holy Cross dean of students Andrew Polaniecki outlined procedures and protocols for the safe return of students to campus this fall, including COVID-19 testing and residential life expectations.All students will be required to take a COVID-19 test within 10 days prior to returning to campus, according to the email. While students can request a test be mailed to their homes, Polaniecki said students are encouraged to find a testing site in their local community. Students with positive test results will be asked to stay home and quarantine for 2 weeks before being approved to return to campus.“The job for all of us is to look out for one another,” Polaniecki said in the email. “Be smart in the two weeks prior to the semester’s start.”Polaniecki said residence hall staff have been approved to move in July 30 while other students eligible for early arrival — including international students — have been contacted individually. First-year students will move in Aug. 7-8 while upperclassmen will move in Aug. 9. First-year room assignments are scheduled to be released July 10. Face coverings and social distancing will be mandated during the move-in period.All students will receive a welcome package with hand disinfectant, a thermometer and at least two masks upon arrival, according to the email.Residence halls will operate at standard capacity with every room considered a “household” for contact tracing purposes. Besides their own rooms, students are expected to follow health precautions.“Students will not need to wear masks when they are in their assigned rooms, but they must wear masks in all other rooms and common spaces, including hallways, lounges and visiting other dormmates,” Polaniecki said in the email.In regard to dining options, the email said Grab and Go and outside dining would be available in addition to indoor dining, where social distancing will be enforced.“In the dining hall, disposable ware will be used, self-service buffets will be replaced with individually portioned, served buffets and other modifications to the space will be made to ensure that we can dine together safely,” Polaniecki said in the email.To ensure the safety of the entire Holy Cross community, Polaniecki said every student and staff member will be required to complete a daily self-screen so that medical personnel can identify students that need to be tested.The email said off-campus students would be asked to complete any quarantine or isolate time in their own housing, and the College has partnered with off-campus housing to isolate students who live on campus.“Isolation rooms on campus and University Edge have been identified for any on-campus infected student,” Polaniecki said. “These students will also be checked on daily and will be provided food and other essentials.”Polaniecki said students will be encouraged to utilize outdoor space for activities and recreation in group settings given the nature of the transmission of the virus.“Student activities, Campus Ministry, hall staff and others that help provide campus programming are eager to meet with students for conversation, pastoral support and program planning,” Polaniecki said.Tags: COVID-19, fall semester 2020, Holy Cross College, Move-inlast_img read more

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Sickness, Dons slow down Cards

first_imgLamar sports informationSAN FRANCISCO — The Lamar men’s basketball team shot better than 57 percent in the second half against San Francisco, but couldn’t overcome an early second-half surge from the Dons. USF used a 14-2 second-half run to pull away from LU handing the Red and White an 82-63 setback.“I wasn’t happy with our performance tonight,” said LU head coach Tic Price. “We had a couple kids get sick on this trip and our last three practices haven’t been up to our standards. I was very concerned about this game tonight. I take my hat off to USF. That is a very good basketball team and they were ready to play tonight.”The Cardinals (4-3) shot 47 percent from the field, but could manage just 4 of 13 (.308) from beyond the arc. USF’s hot start to the second half led to a 50-percent performance from the field for the game. The Dons were held well below their season-average from beyond the arc knocking down just 7-of-25 (.280) attempts.After outrebounding Idaho State by 19 three nights ago, the Cardinals were outrebounded Friday by 10, 37-27, including 14 offensive rebounds for the Dons. Their advantage on the glass led to a 23-8 difference in second change points.The Cardinals were led in scoring by junior Colton Weisbrod who finished the night with 24 points and eight rebounds. Native Californian Joey Frenchwood added 18 points on 7-of-11 shooting.LU did a good job of keeping USF’s leading scorer, Ronnie Boyce, a non-factor. He was held to eight points on 4-of-12 shooting. Chase Foster led the Dons with 20 points.After a slow start, the Cardinals finished the first half shooting 13-of-32 (.406) from the field. LU’s defense also held San Francisco just a tick below its season average in the opening half, 15-of-31 (.484). Unfortunately, the Cardinals could not withstand an early second-half surge from their opponents. USF opened the second half with a 14-2 run to build an 18-point advantage less than four minutes into the half. Big Red never got closer than 15 points after that.last_img read more

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Yoder says he believes growth sparked by GOP tax cuts will mitigate projected $1.5 trillion addition to deficit

first_imgThe day President Donald Trump signed the bill into law, Rep. Kevin Yoder told a group of northeast Johnson County business people and elected officials that he believes the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will spark so much growth in the national economy that the $1.5 trillion in added deficit analysts expect it to bring about will never materialize.“We think that growth will exceed the static score, which is the 2 percent growth,” Yoder said at the NEJC Chamber’s Legislative Preview breakfast Friday. “We think we can move the economy to 3 to 4 percent growth, which will make up for a lot of that.”The 4 percent growth target has been among President Trump’s talking points since before his election in November 2016, but has been widely critiqued by economists, who say such growth would be nearly impossible given the already low unemployment rate. Yoder, who was first elected to Congress during the Tea Party wave of 2010, has been a deficit hawk since early in his Congressional career, and continues to be an outspoken critic of the deficits associated with the stimulus measures signed by President Barack Obama at the height of the financial crisis. He said that during his first term, Congress was faced with government spending that would have amounted to $1.5 trillion in new debt every year. Through a variety of measures enacted after the stimulus, including spending cuts and increases to payroll taxes, the debt has slowed to a level such that the projected deficit will be around $8 trillion over a decade, instead of the $15 trillion that would have added up otherwise.“Because of the Obama era policies, that administration’s tax and spending policies, we’re estimating about an $8 trillion deficit over 10 years,” Yoder said. “[The new tax bill] now bumps that, with a static score — meaning we don’t account for any growth — from $8 trillion to $9.5 trillion.”But, Yoder said, he and fellow Republicans believe that the tax cuts will be so successful that the economy will nearly double the growth rate projected by Congressional estimators, cutting into much of the projected debt associated with the tax cuts. Those predictions don’t square up with the analysis of the the Joint Committee on Taxation, which says the GOP tax bill is only likely to generate about $450 billion in revenue from economic growth, meaning it will add about $1.1 trillion to the deficit over 10 years.Yoder’s remarks to the chamber group begin at 1:02:00 in the video below. His response to our question about what makes him comfortable with the projected debt from the tax bill begins at 1:18:00:last_img read more

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NAIOP Arizona announces new chairman, board members

first_imgTom JohnstonNAIOP Arizona named Tom Johnston of Voit Real Estate Services as its Chairman for 2015. The industry group also named new officers, three new board members and re-nominated an existing board member.Johnston, Managing Director at Voit, will be joined by new officers Bob Hubbard, Vice Chairman, LBA Realty; Larry Pobuda, Programs Chair, The Opus Group; Tammy Carr, Treasurer, Balfour Beatty; and Laurie Sandau, Secretary, GPE Commercial Advisors.New board members include Rusty Kennedy, CBRE; Tom Knoell, Desert Troon Companies; and Larry Pobuda. Anthony Lydon of JLL was re-nominated to the board. Officers serve a one-year term; new board members serve a three-year term.“We’re excited to have our mentorship program taken to a higher level that includes training relevant to each participant’s career path while building relationships with experienced real estate professionals,” Johnston said of one of his goals as chairman. “The creation of our philanthropic foundation will further demonstrate our commitment to giving back to our community.”Megan Creecy-Herman of Liberty Property Trust served as the 2014 chairman and will remain on the Executive Committee.last_img read more

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Studies diverge on link between early antibiotics, obesity

first_imgTwo new observational studies by scientists in New Zealand provide conflicting evidence on the potential link between early childhood exposure to antibiotics and the risk of developing obesity.In one of the studies, both of which appeared this week in JAMA Network Open, researchers found that children who received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 4 years of life were more likely to have a higher body mass index (BMI) score than those who received no antibiotics. In addition, children who received more than nine antibiotic prescriptions by age 4 were more than twice as likely to be obese.In the other study, which looked at antibiotic use during the first 2 years of life, researchers also found a small association between antibiotic use and obesity risk by age 4. But when the researchers conducted further analysis in siblings and twins with different outcomes, they found no link between antibiotic exposure and obesity, leading them to conclude that antibiotics are unlikely to be a major contributor to childhood obesity, and that other, unmeasurable factors may be at work.The two studies are in line with other observational studies on the potential association between early antibiotic use and obesity risk in children, a theory based on research showing that antibiotics alter the still-developing gut microbiome of young children in ways that could lead to weight gain. These studies have produced mixed results, with some finding an association and others finding none.Sorting out confounding effectIn the first study, researchers with the University of Auckland and Harvard Medical School measured the weight and height of more than 5,000 children in New Zealand at 54 months of age, then obtained community pharmacy antibiotic dispensing data for the children. They looked at whether or not the children had any antibiotic exposure by age 4, the age of first exposure, and how many prescriptions they received.Of the 5,128 children analyzed, 95% had received an antibiotic by age 4, and 9% had obesity by 54 months. The analysis, which controlled for familial, lifestyle, and economic factors, found that the BMI score for children who received at least four antibiotic prescriptions was higher than for those who hadn’t been exposed, and it increased with the number of prescriptions the children received. The risk for obesity increased as well. Compared with no exposure, children who received more than nine antibiotic prescriptions had more than double the risk of being obese (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 5.41).The analysis also found an increase in BMI associated with receipt of two or more antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy, and that antibiotic exposure during the first years of life was associated with higher BMI compared with no exposure.”The study findings suggest that repeated antibiotic exposure may be a potentially modifiable risk factor for childhood obesity,” the authors of the study write.In the second study, another team of researchers from the University of Auckland, along with colleagues from Dunedin School of Medicine in New Zealand and Uppsala University in Sweden, looked at antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and the first 2 years of life among 132,000 mothers and 151,000 children in New Zealand. The study, one of the largest undertaken on the topic, included a large cohort of twins and siblings, some of whom had discordant outcomes (ie, one with obesity and one without).”This allowed us to control for a lot of unmeasured and unmeasurable confounding factors, such as genetics (largely), diet, ethnicity, household, stress, sleep patterns, etc.,” corresponding author Wayne Cutfield, MD, of the University of Auckland’s Liggins Institute, said in an email. “These are all corrected for, notably, with twins.”Antibiotic use was common among mothers and children, with at least one course of antibiotics dispensed to 35.7% of mothers during pregnancy and 82.3% of children during the first 2 years of life. Nearly 16% of children were identified as obese. As with the first study, the results showed that both prenatal and early childhood exposure to antibiotics were independently associated with increased BMI and obesity at age 4 in a dose-dependent manner.Across the entire study population, antibiotic exposure during pregnancy yielded a small but increased risk of obesity in children (aOR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.07), as did antibiotic exposure during the first 2 years of life (aOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.05). For children’s exposure to antibiotics, the findings were similar among all siblings (aOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.05) and twins (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09).  But when Cutfield and his colleagues analyzed 6,249 siblings and 522 twins with different outcomes, these associations disappeared. Among the siblings, there were no associations between antibiotic use and odds of obesity for maternal exposure (aOR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.00) or children’s exposure (aOR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.04). The aOR for children’s antibiotic exposure among the twins was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.81 to 1.02).”This initially surprised me, as I was expecting to see a stronger relationship between antibiotic exposure and obesity when background confounding noise was reduced,” Cutfield said.The inability to control for unmeasured family variables, Cutfield explained, likely explains why they found an association between antibiotic exposure and obesity risk in the wider population—and why other studies have found a link between the two.”The weak, dose-related effect of early childhood antibiotics with obesity is probably due to unmeasured/unmeasurable confounding effects, which is always a problem with association studies,” he said. “There are many association studies in the past in which associations have not been borne out when tested in RCTs [randomized controlled trials].”A multifactorial problemIn an editorial that accompanies the two studies, Meghan Azad, PhD, of the University of Manitoba and Arthur Owora, DrPH, of Indiana University write that childhood obesity results from a number of different factors—environmental, socioeconomic, genetic—and that antibiotic exposure is “neither necessary nor sufficient as a cause.”But they argue that it can’t be overlooked, since antibiotics have been used in food-producing animals to promote growth and weight gain, and animal and human studies have documented how antibiotic-induced disruptions of the gut microbiome are linked with metabolism and weight gain.”These 2 studies contribute new data and highlight potential limitations to a growing body of evidence suggesting that antibiotics (among multiple other factors) may contribute to the development of childhood obesity, particularly when repeated exposures occur during the first year of life, a critical time for metabolic programming,” they write.And though it’s unclear whether efforts to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing in children will have an impact on childhood obesity, they say, those efforts are still important.”From a public health perspective, antibiotic stewardship is an urgent priority, regardless of its potential role in obesity prevention,” they write.See also:Jan 22 JAMA Netw Open first studyJan 22 JAMA Netw Open second studyJan 22 JAMA Netw Open editoriallast_img read more

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Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument Closed Due To Impassable Road From Thunderstorms Tuesday

first_imgKasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is closed due to impassable road. Courtesy/BLMBLM News:ALBUQUERQUE – Due to thunderstorms Tuesday, the road to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is impassable.The Monument is closed starting and updates will be posted to www.blm.gov/visit/kktr.For more information, contact the BLM Rio Puerco Field Office at 505.761.8700.About BLMThe BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.last_img read more

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Defend H2O

first_imgGuest speaker Alec Baldwin reminded everyone that, although a year has passed since the first Defend H2O “Living on the Edge in the Face of Climate Change” conversation, not enough progress has been made to protect Long Island’s waters for future generations. Defend H2O founder and president Kevin McAllister interviewed Baldwin at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum on Thursday, August 15. The top-shelf local seafood served was a reminder of the fresh bounty of our local waters. Sharelast_img

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