Severe storms, isolated tornados possible Wednesday afternoon

first_img The Storm Prediction Center of National Weather Service rated the region for a 15 percent chance for severe weather.Warning Coordination Meteorologist Roger Erickson said the area with the highest risk is in East Texas and central Louisiana, with a smaller threat down along the Interstate-10 corridor of southeast Texas, southwest Louisiana and south central Louisiana.Large hail and damaging winds are the primary threats, but an isolated tornado is also possible. Next Up Port Arthur and Mid-County residents could face severe storms Wednesday afternoon.last_img

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Ryann Redmond, Curtis Holbrook and More Complete Casting for New Musical If/Then, Starring Idina Menzel

first_img Related Shows Complete casting has been announced for the Broadway-bound musical If/Then, which will mark the Broadway return of Tony winner Idina Menzel when the show opens at the Richard Rodgers Theatre on March 27, 2014. Previews begin on March 4, following a world premiere out-of-town run at Washington, D.C.’s National Theatre in fall 2013.Joining previously announced stars Menzel, LaChanze, Anthony Rapp, James Snyder, Jerry Dixon, former Broadway.com vlogger Jenn Colella, Jason Tam and Tamika Lawrence, the If/Then ensemble will include Joe Cassidy (Working), Miguel Cervantes (American Idiot), Curtis Holbrook (West Side Story), Stephanie Klemons (In The Heights), Tyler McGee (Ghost), former Broadway.com vlogger Ryann Redmond (Bring It On), Joe Aaron Reid (Catch Me If You Can) and Ann Sanders (Leap of Faith).The musical is set against the ever-shifting landscape of modern day Manhattan and tells the story of Elizabeth (Menzel), a woman on the verge of turning 40 who returns to New York City intent on finding a fresh start in life.If/Then features music, lyrics and book by Next to Normal writers Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, direction by Michael Greif, choreography by Larry Keigwin, set design by Mark Wendland, costume design by Emily Rebholz, lighting design by Kenneth Posner, sound design by Brian Ronan, musical direction by Carmel Dean and orchestrations by Kitt and Michael Starobin. Idina Menzel View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 22, 2015 Star Files If/Thenlast_img read more

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Forces

first_imgThe Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies is a U.S. Department of Defense institute at Fort DeRussy in Waikiki that addresses regional and global security issues. Military and civilian representatives, predominantly from the U.S. and Asia-Pacific nations, participate in a comprehensive program of executive education, professional exchanges and outreach events, both in Hawaii and throughout the Asia-Pacific region.The center supports the U.S. Pacific Command by developing and sustaining relationships among security practitioners and national security establishments throughout the region. The APCSS’s mission is to build capacities and communities of interest by educating, connecting and empowering security practitioners to advance Asia-Pacific security. It is one of the Department of Defense’s five regional security studies centers.Visit APCSS online at:www.apcss.orgwww.facebook.com/DKIAPCSSwww.twitter.com/APCSSMore information is available by calling or emailing:Main: 808-971-8900Public Affairs: 808-971-8916, pao@apcss.orgAdmissions: 808-971-8917, admissionsdept@apcss.orgRegistrar: 808-971-4059, registrarbranch@apcss.orgAlumni: 808-564-5077, alumnidivision@apcss.orgCollege: 808-971-8963, css@apcss.netlast_img read more

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The Band’s Visit Tony Winner David Cromer Joins Cast of The Waverly Gallery on Broadway

first_img View Comments David Cromer, the Tony-winning director of The Band’s Visit, will return to acting this fall, completing the cast of the Broadway premiere production of The Waverly Gallery. Lila Neugebauer will direct the Pulitzer-finalist work by Kenneth Lonergan, slated to begin previews on September 25 with an opening set for October 25 at the Golden Theatre.As an actor, Cromer has been seen on Broadway in the 2014 Tony-winning revival of A Raisin in the Sun and off-Broadway in the acclaimed 2009 staging of Our Town, which he also directed. The Waverly Gallery will also star the previously announced Elaine May, Michael Cera, Lucas Hedges and Joan Allen. The Waverly Gallery centers on the final years of a generous, chatty and feisty grandmother’s battle against Alzheimer’s disease. Gladys (May) is an old-school lefty and social activist and longtime owner of a small art gallery in Greenwich Village. The play explores her fight to retain her independence and the subsequent effect of her decline on her family, especially her grandson (Hedges).The creative team will include David Zinn (scenic design), Ann Roth (costume design) and Brian MacDevitt (lighting design). Related Shows Star Files The Waverly Gallery Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 27, 2019 David Cromerlast_img read more

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Tony-Winning Choreographer Rob Ashford Receives Sardi’s Portrait

first_imgRob Ashford (Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser for Broadway.com) Related Shows Frozen stars Caissie Levy and Patti Murin celebrate the show’s choreographer Rob Ashford. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 11, 2020center_img Frozen choreographer Rob Ashford received a huge honor on October 10 when he received a Sardi’s portrait. Ashford won a Tony for his Thoroughly Modern Millie choreography and has worked on over 18 Broadway productions as a cast member, choreographer and director and has earned eight Tony Award nominations. Some of the biggest Broadway stars showed their support at the portrait unveiling, including Frozen stars Caissie Levy and Patti Murin and Broadway legend Chita Rivera. Check out the photos below to celebrate Ashford’s success. Rob Ashford with Broadway legend Chita Rivera. (Photo: Eric Emch) Frozenlast_img read more

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New Horizons principal drawn to opportunity to ‘know every kid personally’

first_imgNew Horizons High School Principal Paul Colwell comes to Shawnee Mission from Turner High School, where he was principal.When classes get underway at Horizons High School in Mission next week, students will see a new face in the halls, the office — and just about everywhere they go.New principal Paul Colwell said the opportunity to get to know each and every one of the students at the district’s alternative high school was one of the key attractions that brought him to the job. Having served as the principal of the 1,100-student Turner High School for the past seven years, Colwell said he was drawn to the idea of the more intimate setting.“I’m going to know every kid personally, which I’m super excited about,” he said.Colwell served as a science teacher at SM South before moving to Turner, where he was an assistant principal for five years before moving into the top job at the school. As a district patron – his kids attend Rose Hill Elementary and Indian Woods Middle School — he said he’d admired Shawnee Mission for a number of years and was always interested in a return. The Horizons opportunity struck him as a unique challenge and a good fit for his temperament and skill set.“Kids come to alternative setting for different reasons. Some are behind in credits, some simply don’t feel like the comprehensive high schools are a good fit. Sometimes kids feel a little lost or want a smaller setting,” he said. “One of the things I’ve loved hearing since getting here is this message that Dr. [Kenny] Southwick stresses, which is ‘All means all.’ We’re going to try to get kids career and college ready — everybody.”Colwell hasn’t had experience working in an alternative setting before, but says one of his top goals is to create a true sense of community at the school. With a staff of 16 and approximately 130 students who come to the school from throughout the district’s high school feeder areas, Horizons provides a close-knit, but not geographically connected, experience.“I hope we can figure out a way to engage the community, especially with the kids at Horizons, because it’s a partnership,” he said. “We also need somebody at home to say, ‘Hey, how’s your day going?’ And the businesses, too. We want to see them saying, ‘We support Horizons.’”last_img read more

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A celebratory mood surrounds lighting of Corinth Square tree, with event proceeds benefitting PV families in need

first_imgKC Wolf and Mayor Laura Wassmer greeted each other on stage.Dancerz Unlimited students put on a toy soldiers number.SM East’s drumline kept the crowd enthused ahead of the flipping of the switch.After helping light the tree, Santa fielded gift requests.The Corinth merchants help open houses showing off their Christmas decorations, like Mely’s intricate ginger bread houses. Youngsters explored the tree decorations after the lighting ceremony.Back for its 31st year, the Mayor’s Holiday Tree Lighting ceremony in Prairie Village on Thursday drew hundreds to Corinth Square to ring in the Christmas season.Mayor Laura Wassmer was joined by Kansas City Chiefs mascot KC Wolf and Santa himself to flip the switch on the tree, adorned with bright lights and gold and red bulbs. The crowd also got to enjoy the dancing of young performers from Dancerz Unlimited and the Shawnee Mission East drum line.Donations accepted during the evening go to the Prairie Village Foundation’s Mayor’s Holiday Tree Fund, which provides assistance to residents who are having difficulty with home maintenance costs, utility bills and other needs.You can still make a donation to the fund throughout the holiday season. Find more information on the foundation’s website here.last_img read more

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How to beat smoking, other bad habits with better self-control

first_imgCNN:Ready to kick your bad habit once and for all?Even if you’re not completely committed yet, there’s a technique that may unconsciously help, whether you’re intending to quit smoking, binge eating, gambling or another addictive behavior — and even if you don’t think you’re ready.A review of addiction research, published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, suggests mindful meditation strengthens self-control in smokers, even among those smokers who haven’t set an intention to quit.…“Rather than trying to stop smoking, IBMT focuses on improving the self-control network in the brain and moderating stress-reactivity, that may help treat the inner cause of smoking,” says lead author Yi-Yuan Tang, a professor of psychological sciences at Texas Tech. “Moreover, there was no correlation between intention and smoking changes. If smokers do not have an intrinsic need and craving, why not change smoking behavior?”…The motivational system is a set of brain mechanisms that helps achieve goals, according to Art Markman, professor of psychology at the University of Texas and author of “Smart Change: Five Tools to Create New and Sustainable Habits in Yourself and Others.” Your motivational system takes goals and uses one set of brain mechanisms, which Markman calls the “Go system,” to drive behavior. The “Stop system” tries to avoid succumbing to temptations or prevent things you don’t want to do.Read the whole story: CNN More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Activity up at some colleges, New Zealand shots start, Ig deficiency may predict flu severity, Czech official has flu, concern over flu at Olympics

first_imgFeb 3, 2010 Flu activity up slightly at some US collegesFlu activity was up a bit at colleges last week, though the levels haven’t changed significantly over the past 6 weeks, consistent with the decreasing national trend, the American College Health Association (ACHA) said today in its latest update. The attack rate was 2.6 per 10,000 students, about 15% higher than the previous week. No new deaths or hospitalizations were reported. Overall vaccine uptake remained at 9%, but rates were as high as 40% in some states.http://www.acha.org/ILI_Project/ILI_Surveillance.cfmACHA report for the week ending Jan 29New Zealand begins H1N1 vaccinationNew Zealand, which saw some of the earliest deaths from H1N1 influenza during its 2009 winter flu season, has received its first doses of H1N1 vaccine and is scheduling a national shot campaign. The first recipients of the 1 million doses will be health workers, pregnant women, young children, and the chronically ill. The Southern Hemisphere country is concerned that the virus may return from the Northern Hemisphere and trigger an earlier than usual flu season.http://tvnz.co.nz/health-news/health-workers-line-up-vaccine-3347994Feb 3 ONE News reportImmunoglobulin deficiency may predict flu outcomeAustralian researchers say they have identified an immune-system protein that may play a key role in determining the severity of H1N1 flu infection. Among patients hospitalized with H1N1 flu, there was a correlation between severity of symptoms and deficiency in immunoglobulin G2, which supports early response to infection. The authors say that may explain the seriousness of H1N1 flu in pregnant women, because pregnancy mutes immune responses, and may point to a predictive test or treatment.Feb 1 Clinical Infectious Diseases abstracthttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/650462Czech Republic health chief contracts fluMichael Vit, chief health officer of the Czech Republic, told media in that country that he is home sick with a flu infection that is presumed to be H1N1 influenza, according to Reuters. Vit oversaw flu vaccinations for key members of the government but missed his own because of an overseas trip, the news service said. Vit’s ministry led recently abandoned plans for mandatory vaccination of the Czech armed forces.http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/LDE61124E.htmFeb 2 Reuters reportCDC warns about flu at Vancouver OlympicsWith the 2010 Olympic Winter Games set to begin in Vancouver, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a set of travel tips it calls “Stop, wash and go.” The agency recommends that attendees receive H1N1 flu vaccine before leaving, delay their departures if they feel unwell, cover coughs and sneezes, and wash their hands frequently. It also suggests taking a travel health kit containing hand sanitizer, tissues, and pain and fever medications.http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2010/r100202.htmFeb 2 CDC travel advicelast_img read more

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Biosecurity Scan for Dec 17, 2014

first_imgRisk-benefit analysis is next step toward policy on GOF researchIn the wake of this week’s symposium on gain-of-function (GOF) virologic research, the next step is for a federal advisory panel to develop plans for a risk-benefit analysis of such studies, says a spokeswoman for the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).The Obama administration recently suspended funding for GOF research on influenza and two other viruses to allow time to develop a federal policy. To launch the policy development effort, the 2-day symposium earlier this week aired scientific and technical questions related to GOF research. It was hosted by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine.The term “GOF” generally refers to experiments that involve enhancing the pathogenicity, transmissibility, or host range of a pathogenic microbe, in the interest of better understanding disease pathways and developing vaccines and drugs.NAS spokeswoman Jennifer Walsh said a summary of the symposium will be provided to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) in January and will also be made available to the public via the National Academies Press Web site.The summary should help the NSABB as it works with a contractor to develop a “risk/benefit analysis structure” on GOF research, Walsh told CIDRAP News. After the NSABB publishes the analysis structure, the NAS will hold a second conference to allow for public comments on it, she added.The estimated timing for the second meeting is July 2015, but it will depend on when the draft plan is released, Walsh said. She also noted that a video recording of this week’s symposium should be available online next week. Dec 12 CIDRAP News item on GOF symposium Oct 17 CIDRAP News item on funding pause Government search turns up more misplaced lab pathogensThe months-long sweep of government labs in the wake of the summertime discovery of security breaches involving anthrax, smallpox, and other disease pathogens has turned up yet more previously unaccounted-for pathogens, including ricin and a deadly form of avian flu virus, the Washington Post reported yesterday.The sweep was ordered after lab workers were potentially exposed to Bacillus anthracis—which causes anthrax—at a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lab in June, followed in July by the discovery of smallpox vials on the campus of the National Institutes of Health and a CDC breach involving highly pathogenic avian flu viruses. The search has involved nearly a dozen federal agencies, 4,000 labs, and more than 40 million samples, the Post noted. The latest findings were released yesterday.On Sep 5 officials said the search at that point had turned up other misplaced microbes, including those that cause plague, tularemia, melioidosis, botulism, and a certain foodborne disease, as well as ricin. In late August officials had asked federally funded labs to suspend all work for about 24 hours to conduct microbe inventories.The pathogens discovered in recent weeks included vials of virulent avian flu virus at US Department of Agriculture labs in Iowa and Georgia and samples of botulinum toxin at a CDC lab. The Post story did not specify the strain of avian flu, but it said those samples and the botulinum toxin were destroyed.It added that other microbe samples were transferred to labs authorized to house them. Officials said all samples of dangerous pathogens were safely stored and there was no evidence to suggest anyone was exposed to them.Dec 16 Washington Post story Sep 5 CIDRAP News scan on previous lab discoverieslast_img read more

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