Messi deserves Ballon d’Or every year, says Bartomeu

first_imgArgentina’s Lionel Messi delivers a speech after winning the FIFA Men’s soccer player of the year 2015 prize during the FIFA Ballon d’Or awarding ceremony at the Kongresshaus in Zurich, Switzerland, Monday, January 11, 2016. (Valeriano Di Domenico/KEYSTONE via AP))Barcelona star Lionel Messi should win the Ballon d’Or award every year, according to club president Josep Maria Bartomeu, after the Argentine was beaten to the prize by Real Madrid rival Cristiano Ronaldo.“The Ballon d’Or should be Messi’s every year as he is the best player in the history of football,” said Bartomeu on Tuesday. ADVERTISEMENT The Ballon d’Or has passed back and forth between Ronaldo and Messi for the last nine years, since Brazilian Kaka won the 2007 award.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town “There are other good players but Messi is undoubtedly number one.”Ronaldo was crowned the world’s best footballer for a fourth time earlier this month, edging out long-time nemesis Messi, who is a record five-time winner of the award.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliThe decision was heavily questioned by those at the Camp Nou, especially after Messi’s sublime display in Sunday’s 4-1 defeat of neighbors Espanyol in the Catalan derby.But Ronaldo was rewarded for helping Real win the Champions League and leading Portugal to Euro 2016 glory. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes PH among economies most vulnerable to virus EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise LOOK: Michael Phelps poses with 23 gold medals for magazine cover Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports We are young Senators to proceed with review of VFA MOST READ Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Meet the winners of the 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Air Pollution, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Gold Mining, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Pollution, Water Pollution Six of the seven winners of the 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize recipients are women.Dubbed the Green Nobel Prize, the annual award honors grassroots environmental heroes from Europe, Asia, North America, Central and South America, Africa, and islands and island nations.This year’s winners are Makoma Lekalakala and Liz McDaid from South Africa; Claire Nouvian from France; Francia Márquez from Colombia; Khanh Nguy Thi from Vietnam; LeeAnne Walters from the United States; and Manny Calonzo from the Philippines. The Goldman Environmental Prize, the world’s most prestigious award for grassroots environmental activism, has announced seven winners this year. Six of the winners are women.Dubbed the Green Nobel Prize, the annual award honors grassroots environmental heroes from Europe, Asia, North America, Central and South America, Africa, and islands and island nations.This year’s winners include activists who built a coalition to stop the South African government’s “secret” $76 billion nuclear deal with Russia; a former journalist and filmmaker whose advocacy campaign resulted in a European Union-wide ban on deep-sea bottom trawling; a leader of the Afro-Colombian community who helped stop illegal gold mining; an activist who helped support Vietnam’s transition to more renewable and sustainable energy solutions; a stay-at-home mom who exposed the Flint water crisis in the U.S.; and an environmental activist whose advocacy campaign was instrumental in helping enact lead-safe paint regulations in the Philippines.The winners will be awarded the prize at the San Francisco Opera House in California, U.S., on April 23. This will be followed by a ceremony at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., on April 25.Here are the winners of the 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize.Makoma Lekalakala and Liz McDaid, South AfricaMakoma Lekalakala, director of the volunteer-driven environmental group Earthlife Africa, and Liz McDaid, an environmentalist at SAFCEI (Southern African Faith Communities’ Environment Institute), together challenged a $76 billion “secret” nuclear power deal that South Africa’s government had made with Russia. The deal aimed to develop 9.6 gigawatts of nuclear energy through eight to 10 nuclear power plants throughout South Africa.Concerned about the environmental impacts resulting from the scaling up of South Africa’s uranium mining and nuclear waste production, Lekalakala and McDaid exposed the details of the Russian nuclear deal, raised public awareness through rallies and anti-nuclear vigils, and challenged the legal standing of the nuclear deal in court.In April 2017, their efforts resulted in a landmark victory, when the Western Cape High Court ruled that the South Africa-Russia nuclear deal was both unlawful and unconstitutional.Makoma Lekalakala, right, and Liz McDaid, South Africa. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.Claire Nouvian, FranceClaire Nouvian, president and founder of the nonprofit conservation group BLOOM, based in Paris and Hong Kong, won this year’s Goldman prize for her advocacy campaign against the practice of using bottom trawls — giant fishing nets that drag along the seafloor and scoop up huge amounts of fish — in the deep sea.Nouvian was working on a book on deep-sea creatures when she discovered the widespread damage that bottom-trawling causes in deep-sea ecosystems. She also found that France lacked policies to protect those ecosystems.Nouvian gathered evidence and won a legal battle against Intermarché, a French supermarket giant and owner of a deep-sea fishing fleet, over advertising campaigns that falsely claimed its fishing practices weren’t harmful to the marine environment. Nouvian also launched a successful data-driven campaign that contributed to France supporting a ban on deep-sea bottom-trawling, which led to an EU-wide ban on the practice.Claire Nouvian, France. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.Francia Márquez, ColombiaThis year’s winner from Latin America is Francia Márquez, the leader of an Afro-Colombian community in La Toma, a town in the Cauca Mountains of southwest Colombia. Márquez has been instrumental in stopping illegal gold mining in the region, despite death threats against her family.In November 2014, for example, Márquez organized a 10-day, 350-kilometer (217-mile) march of 80 women to Colombia’s capital, Bogotá, bringing national attention to the environmental and social destruction that illegal gold mining was causing in La Toma and other communities in the Cauca region.Márquez and the community of La Toma also clinched a deal with the Colombian government to end illegal mining in La Toma. By the end of 2016, all illegal mining operations in La Toma had ended, and the Colombian security forces had physically removed or destroyed illegal mining machinery operating in the town.Francia Márquez, Colombia. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.Khanh Nguy Thi, VietnamKhanh Nguy Thi, the co-founder of Vietnam’s Green Innovation and Development Centre (GreenID), won this year’s prize for her efforts to usher in a greener energy plan for Vietnam.After the Vietnamese government published its 2016-2030 Power Development Plan in 2011, outlining the country’s future energy needs, Khanh advocated for reduced dependency on coal power and worked with colleagues and state officials to develop an alternative, greener energy plan.Her research and efforts helped support the Vietnamese government’s announcement of its revised Power Development Plan in March 2016 — one that depended more on renewable energy such as wind, solar and biomass, and much less on coal-fired power plants.Khanh Nguy Thi, Vietnam. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.LeeAnne Walters, United StatesLeeAnne Walters, a stay-at-home mom in Flint, Michigan, brought to attention the now well-known Flint water crisis.Walters knew something was wrong with Flint’s water when she and her 3-year-old twin daughters began losing hair in 2014. Around the same time, the water from her kitchen sink started coming out brown. Walters got her home’s tap water tested and found that it had very high levels of lead (104 parts per billion). She also discovered that all of her four children had high levels of exposure to lead, while one of the twins was diagnosed with lead poisoning.Walters led a citizens’ movement, garnering support to test tap water across Flint. Her efforts led to the exposure of the Flint water crisis, and compelled the local, state and federal governments to ensure access to clean drinking water.LeeAnne Walters, United States. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.Manny Calonzo, the PhilippinesEnvironmental activist Manny Calonzo won this year’s Goldman prize for his campaign against lead-based paint in the Philippines.Calonzo, through the NGO EcoWaste, conducted several studies that showed the majority of paint sold in the Philippines contained harmful levels of lead, and that children in the country were being exposed to high lead levels. Following these findings, Calonzo started building alliances in support of eliminating lead paint, and called for national regulations mandating lead-safe paint across the Philippines.In December 2013, the Philippine government established a mandatory maximum limit of 90 parts per million for lead in paint; as of January 2017, 85 percent of paint in the country has been certified as lead-safe.Manny Calonzo, the Philippines. Image by Goldman Environment Prize.center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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Geneticists: It’s time to mix the Sumatran rhino subspecies

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Featured, Mammals, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Sumatran rhino populations living in Borneo and Sumatra have been genetically separated for hundreds of thousands of years.The species as a whole has no more than 100 living individuals in the wild, and perhaps as few as 30. Another nine are in captivity.In a recent study of Sumatran rhinos’ mitochondrial DNA, geneticists argue it’s time to combine the subspecies, despite the potential risks and drawbacks.The question is given extra urgency with plans afoot to capture a female rhino in Indonesian Borneo. In a forest in Borneo, a single two-horned rhino lives, separated from any other of her kind. Conservationists are currently planning to catch this Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) and bring her into captivity, in the hope that she might contribute to saving the pummeled species. But given there are only two other captive rhinos in Borneo, neither of which has produced an heir, scientists are faced with a dilemma: Should they attempt to mate her with captive rhinos in Sumatra, even though they belong to an entirely different subspecies that hasn’t mixed in hundreds of thousands of years?“Unfortunately, the situation for Sumatran rhinos has become so dire that we can no longer hope to manage the subspecies separately,” says Margaret Kinnaird, a rhino expert with WWF-International. “There simply are not enough individuals in each subspecies.”Currently, conservationists estimate that fewer than a hundred Sumatran rhinos survive in the wild. But the reality could be bleaker — maybe as few as 30.In 2012, conservationists formally announced a willingness to mix the subspecies, but haven’t done it yet. The idea, however, is boosted by a new paper in Journal of Heredity, which takes a fresh look at the Sumatran rhino’s genetics, focusing on mitochondrial DNA. Like Kinnaird, the paper’s authors argue it’s time to combine the subspecies, despite the potential risks and drawbacks.“I can’t see any other way to preserve the Borneo gene pool among living rhinos,” says Alfred Roca, one of the authors of the paper with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.But he makes the recommendation reluctantly.“As a geneticist, it is disturbing to have to recommend that the two very different subspecies be combined.”Tam, one of two Bornean rhinos currently living in captivity in Malaysia. Photo by Jeremy Hance for Mongabay.Genetics bears out the subspeciesHistorically, taxonomists split the Sumatran rhino into three subspecies: One in Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula, known as the western Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis sumatrensis); another in Borneo — the smallest — dubbed the Bornean rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni); and one that used to roam India, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Myanmar, the so-called northern Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis lasiotis). Looking at 39 samples, from both living rhinos and museum specimens, Roca’s team uncovered deep genetic separation between these historical subspecies.“It looks like the museum researchers working with skulls and calipers got the three subspecies right,” he says.Today, the northern Sumatran rhino subspecies is likely gone, wiped out by poaching, deforestation and an inability to recover from increasingly small populations.No one knows for sure how many wild Bornean rhinos are left, but it’s not many. WWF has verified two or three wild rhinos, but according to Kinnaird, there are a number of forests areas that may still host rhinos in Kalimantan, the Indonesian portion of Borneo. WWF has claimed there are 15 rhinos left in Kalimantan, but this was an estimate, not a confirmed survey of individual animals.Combining the surviving subspecies — the Bornean and the Sumatran — would ensure the unique genetic build of the Bornean doesn’t go the way of the northern. But it would also mean mixing subspecies that have been separated for around 300,000 years, making them nearly as distinct as Homo sapiens from Neanderthals, Roca says.The taxidermied remains of Sumatran rhino Ipuh, who fathered three calves at the Cincinnati Zoo. Samples of his genetic material have been cryogenically preserved to be used for research and to create new calves in the future. Image courtesy of the Cincinnati Museum Center.There are two concerns with breeding distantly related subspecies. The first is that the rhinos have diverged so far from each other that they would not able to reproduce even if they met in the wild. However, Roca believes this is “unlikely.”The other is more pressing.“There may be local adaptations among the Borneo and Sumatran rhinos. For example, they may have evolved for thousands of years to resist pathogens local to each island,” he says.Given this, Roca now recommends a plan suggested to him by Spartaco Gippoliti of the Società Italiana di Storia della Fauna. Instead of mixing the subspecies willy-nilly, he says, conservationists should create two distinct groups: one that is just the western Sumatran rhino and another a Sumatran-Bornean mix. Once the species is stabilized, captive western rhinos could be released in Sumatra while the Bornean mix could be sent to Borneo for rewilding.Such a plan would require more rhinos than are currently in captivity. There are only two Bornean rhinos under human care now, neither capable of breeding naturally. Sumatra houses seven captive rhinos, but only two are proven breeders. Given this, a number of conservationists are pushing to bring as many wild rhinos as possible into captivity to create more babies. They fear that the wild populations will slowly collapse, as they have in many other places, due to so few animals being able to successfully breed.“If Sumatran rhinos could indeed be effectively bred in captivity and the population increased, then absolutely the answer would be yes, they should all be brought into a captive setting,” Roca says, though he notes he’s not an expert on captive breeding. But he points to the examples of California condors and black-footed ferrets as successful analogues for captive breeding to save a species.“At the very least, gametes and cell lines should be collected from every wild Sumatran rhino,” he adds.Rosa, who was born in the wild in Sumatra, now lives at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park. Image courtesy of Terri Roth.Of cell lines and gametesSumatran rhino breeding may not happen so much naturally as artificially in the future, allowing researchers to inject genetic diversity that decades ago would have been impossible. Collecting gametes today, i.e. eggs and sperm, along with cell lines could ensure the most genetically diverse population possible.“The gametes could currently be used for artificial insemination, even if rhinos are not physically moved,” Roca says.But cell lines may hold even more potential for injecting genetic diversity into future populations. Roca says that preserved cells could create “artificial gametes” within 10 to 20 years. Technology already exists to turn everyday skin cells into stem cells, and this has already been done for some rhino species. The next step, turning stem cells into so-called artificial gametes, has yet to happen, though scientists are currently trying with mice.One day, conservationists could use the genetics of long-dead rhinos, via cell lines, to bear new babies, Roca says. “It is not science fiction to think it will soon be quite feasible.”If it becomes reality, Roca holds out a tantalizing possibility that the Bornean rhino could be resurrected in full. Here’s how: full Bornean rhinos could be born via preserved genetics and sent out to an established population of Sumatran-Borneo mix. Over time, the Bornean migrants would overtake the genetics of the Sumatran-Borneo mix, in something called the island-continent model.“Each passing generation, the lineage would genetically resemble the Borneo rhinos more and more, and the rhinos from Sumatra less,” Roca says, adding that“eventually the ‘island’ gene pool is simply replaced by that of the migrants, who arrive generation after generation.”Roca calls this “the most under-appreciated concept in all of population genetics.”Estimates vary for the amount of Sumatran rhinos currently living in the wild. The official figure is as many as 100, while the worst-case scenario could be as low as 30. Another nine live in captivity in Indonesia and Malaysia. Image courtesy of Terri Roth.Back to BorneoAll this would be far in the future. Today, the focus remains on that single Bornean rhino in Kalimantan. A successful capture is hardly guaranteed; in 2016, another rhino perished shortly after being captured by a team lead by WWF.“If we are successful in catching the targeted rhino in West Kalimantan, it will go to a temporary sanctuary that has already been established in Kalimantan,” Kinnaird says.And the rhino might stay there. WWF is planning a permanent, multimillion-dollar sanctuary modeled after the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Sumatra. But the question remains: Will there be rhinos to fill it? And is this the best use of any individuals caught?Kinnaird says that even if the rhino is kept in West Kalimantan it could still be potentially combined with the western Sumatran subspecies via sharing eggs or sperm. But to date, in vitro fertilization hasn’t worked in the Sumatran rhino.So far, the only thing that has worked, and even then not very well, is natural breeding.“My personal opinion is that she should be sent to the sanctuary in Sumatra where she could contribute to the breeding pool,” Kinnaird says.If so, she could be put to immediate use — not just in preserved eggs and cell lines, but, if all goes well, in good old-fashioned natural breeding.Citation:Jessica R. Brandt, Peter J. van Coeverden de Groot, Kelsey E. Witt, Paige K. Engelbrektsson, Kristofer M. Helgen, Ripan S. Malhi, Oliver A. Ryder, and Alfred L. Roca. (2018) Genetic Structure and Diversity Among Historic and Modern Populations of the Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis). Journal of Heredity, 1–13. doi:10.1093/jhered/esy019Banner Image: Emi and calf at the Cincinnati Zoo, the first facility to successfully breed a Sumatran rhino in captivity in over a century. Image courtesy of Dave Jenike/Cincinnati Zoo.center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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Indonesian mine watchdog sues government for concession maps

first_imgActivism, Conservation Technology, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forests, Freedom of Information, Governance, Land Use Change, Mapping, Mining, Rainforests, Regulations, Technology And Conservation, Transparency, Tropical Forests The Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam) filed the freedom-of-information lawsuit after failing to get a response to its earlier requests to the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources.The group contends that it needs the mapping data, in the shapefile (SHP) digital mapping format, to monitor whether mining concessions overlap onto conservation areas or farmland.Jatam has previously successfully sued to obtain the release of similar records at the provincial level, and says the ministry’s refusal to comply is a violation of transparency provisions in both the freedom of information and mining laws. JAKARTA — Environmental activists are suing the Indonesian government for the release of records of mining licenses and concessions, in a move seen as crucial to bringing greater transparency to the extractives sector.The Mining Advocacy Network, known by its Indonesian acronym of Jatam, filed the lawsuit on Sept. 6 with the Central Information Commission, or KIP, the government clearinghouse for freedom of information requests. They cover so-called mining business licenses (IUP); community mining licenses (IPR), issued for mining operations with a limited concession and investment; and special mining business licenses (IUPK).The move comes after an initial request on July 2 for the data, in shapefile (SHP) digital mapping format, went unanswered by the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources. A follow-up on July 23 was also ignored, said Ahmad Saini, a Jatam activist.A coal mining operation near the Bukit Tigapuluh National National Conservation area in Riau, Indonesia. Image courtesy of Kemal Jufri/GreenpeaceShapefiles allow for much more sophisticated analysis of mapping data, and watchdogs say it is crucial that they have it if they are to play a monitoring role in the world’s third-largest forest nation.But obtaining files in this format has been a struggle, with the government saying it cannot reliably authenticate the files it releases. In response to a previous, separate request by Greenpeace for forest cover maps, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry said that because it could not watermark an SHP file as it could a JPEG or PDF file, the data must remain confidential. It warned that unauthenticated files, if released, could be doctored by unscrupulous parties and passed off as the real thing.But NGOs counter that it is quite simple to digitally sign an SHP file using the Kleopatra certificate manager. This would allow the ministry to certify and timestamp a document in such a way that any forgery could easily be debunked.In the current case, Jatam says having access to the mining data is an important part of being able to monitor concessions from which residents have been evicted for mining.“People in villages hardly know what’s going on, and all of a sudden a permit’s been issued,” Ahmad said.He said Jatam planned to overlay the mining maps onto maps from the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. “We want to see whether there’s any overlap,” he said, “for example, whether a mining concession overlaps onto a conservation zone or onto farmland.”Mining operation in Riau Province on the Indonesian Island of Sumatra. Image by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Ahmad said he was confident the KIP would grant Jatam’s lawsuit because the mining maps requested were ostensibly public documents.He also said there was a legal precedent, at the provincial level, for such records to be released. Jatam has previously successfully sued for the release of similar mining records in East Kalimantan province. An identical request to the North Kalimantan provincial government was granted without the need for a lawsuit. Jatam is also awaiting the outcome of a lawsuit filed against the Central Sulawesi government for the same kinds of records.Ahmad said it was incumbent on the national government, represented by the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, to set a good example for local governments nationwide and release the documents. Failure to do so, he said, would be a violation of the country’s Freedom of Information Act and go against a pledge by President Joko Widodo to boost transparency in government.“Indonesian law also stipulates that the government has to disclose plans for mining and exploration licenses,” he added.The story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 6, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Can social media save great apes?

first_imgAnimals, Apes, Archive, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Gorillas, Great Apes, Innovation In Conservation, Mammals, Primates Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Bonobos, gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees face a fight for survival, and social media offers a new tool to help people connect with these endangered great apes.Conservation groups say that, handled correctly, social media can help raise awareness — and funds.What’s good for social media isn’t always good for apes. Experts caution that posts featuring interactions between humans and animals or unusual animal behavior should be accompanied by explanations that put the images into context. An orphaned baby chimpanzee rests his head on his rescuer’s arm as he takes in the scenery during a special flight destined for a sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The pilot, Anthony Caere, cradles Mussa and gives him a soft kiss on the head. Although Mussa was recently ripped from his mother’s arms, he appears comfortable with Caere, and even plays with a few of the aircraft’s knobs and switches during the flight.Over the past year, a number of great apes have experienced brushes with fame, including Ponso, “the loneliest chimp” in the Ivory Coast; Lulingu, the “laughing” baby gorilla; and Mussa, whose mother was killed by poachers. Their viral stories grabbed public attention on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and via large news organizations.Bonobos, gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees face a fight for survival, and social media offers a new tool to help people connect with these endangered great apes. While great ape advocacy organizations are ready to wield the power of social media, they’re not just aiming for shares and likes, they say. Rather, sanctuaries and advocacy groups want to use those viral stories — and social media in general — to help save our closest relatives.Footage of a baby chimp’s rescue flight posted by the Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Center went viral. Shared on social media as well as by media organizations, the video has been viewed more than 2 million times. Image courtesy of Primate Rehabilitation Center.Going viralThe Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Center in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) got a major boost from Mussa’s viral flight in February. Technical director Itsaso Vélez del Burgo Guinea says she had no idea that Caere was filming, let alone that the video would go viral.“He sent me some footage and I thought it was beautiful,” she says. “We then released the video and it was clear it was going to be a boom. Immediately, it got a lot of attention in social media and from journalists calling and wanting to talk about the rescue.”And, Vélez del Burgo Guinea says, all those views and shares translated into an increase in social media followers and even donations, which she says are “very important to continue saving chimpanzees.”Through a partnership with an organization called FLOAT, Lwiro continued to capitalize on Mussa’s viral video, this time with sales of a limited-edition T-shirt depicting Mussa. FLOAT says on its website that it partners with a new charity each week, donating $8 for every purchase made on the site during that week. Vélez del Burgo Guinea calls the T-shirt another “great coincidence.”A new fundraising toolNot every story will go viral, but organizations working to protect great apes are harnessing social media tools to spread word about their mission and gain financial support.Diana Goodrich, co-director of the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest in Washington state, says her organization has taken advantage of Facebook’s donation and fundraising tools. When the sanctuary welcomed its chimpanzees in 2008, she says, it relied heavily on Facebook Causes, a now-defunct tool.Today, the organization is still benefiting from Facebook fundraising tools such as the direct donate option and personal fundraisers. As a result, more than 5 percent of the organization’s total individual giving this year — and nearly 3 percent of total giving, which includes events, grants and corporate fundraising — comes from Facebook donations, a method that requires little maintenance by the organization. As this story was written, the organization had 35 active fundraisers by individuals, most of them in honor of birthdays.A big chunk of the organization’s Facebook giving so far in 2018 — $3,000 out of a total $11,732 — resulted from a fundraiser that The Dodo posted on Facebook after creating a video that featured Foxie, one of the sanctuary’s rescue chimpanzees who loves troll dolls. The Dodo’s post has more than 27,000 reactions and 5,000 shares, and its fundraiser has about 100 individual contributions.While social media fundraising can be lucrative, it’s not likely to replace traditional funding methods among nonprofit organizations any time soon. But it’s still in its infancy and can bring high returns with little investment from the organization.Posts that share the names and stories of primates are popular with readers. Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest describes Missy, formerly held in a research lab, as loyal, adventurous and possessed of a silly sense of humor. Image courtesy of Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest.A helping hand“Word of mouth is everything in social media,” says Jessie Jory, development coordinator for the Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI) in Washington, D.C.But it’s not just news sites like The Dodo that are helping to boost social media about great apes. Jory says BCI’s online presence got a huge boost this summer from celebrity endorsements on Facebook and Instagram. Actress Ashley Judd partnered with the organization earlier this year to start a Care2 petition, and has shared and posted several social media posts about bonobos and BCI to her followers in the past few months, including a BCI fundraiser.Posts from National Geographic wildlife photographer Frans Lanting, who joined BCI and Judd on an expedition in Africa in June, were also pivotal, according to Jory. “Because he has fame and is connected with National Geographic and [has] a lot of respect in the photography community, we’re introduced to an audience who is a perfect fit for us,” she says. “Social media-wise, he’s probably one of our biggest influencers.”Actress Ashley Judd (left) interviews community leader Josephine Mpanga, BCI president Sally Jewell Coxe, and community leader Bijou Longenge Mpako in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Conservation groups credit partnerships with celebrities like Judd with expanding their social reach. Image courtesy of Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI).Since May 1, BCI’s Instagram following has more than doubled, which Jory thinks can be partially attributed to the Care2 petition along with tagged posts from Lanting and Judd. And this celebrity-driven exposure is something the species desperately needs, Jory says. “The fact that so few people know about bonobos is one of our biggest hurdles.”The Atlanta-based Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund (Fossey Fund) also received a big celebrity endorsement this year from talk show host Ellen DeGeneres. In honor of DeGeneres’s 60th birthday, her wife, Portia de Rossi,  set up a wildlife fund. The DeGeneres fund’s first project will be building a Rwanda campus for the Fossey Fund. Since then, DeGeneres has used both her television show and social media as tools to get the word out about gorilla conservation and her partnership with the Fossey Fund.“She’s definitely done an incredible job of raising awareness of ways to help,” says Rand Lines, digital communications manager for the Fossey Fund. Like BCI, the organization has seen a boost in social media as a result of its celebrity endorsements. Lines says the Fossey Fund believes the extra publicity generated by DeGeneres will lead to greater awareness of endangered gorillas and conservation in general.What people wantSocial media followers like getting to know apes on a more personal level, according to several organizations.Jory says BCI’s most popular posts on Facebook and Instagram feature photos with the names of identified bonobos attached. She says that while naming the bonobos is a new trend for the organization, the practice helps its followers relate more easily to the apes.“I love when people start to recognize the chimpanzees and know their names,” says Vélez del Burgo Guinea of the Lwiro center in the DRC. She says Lwiro’s followers respond best to pictures and stories of apes being rescued from terrible situations. People recognize the pain and the suffering in the animals, she says, and “it is beautiful to see their transformation. Chimps are amazing resilient animals.”Goodrich agrees that personal connections to her sanctuary’s chimpanzees are successful, and cites a recent post Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest made about resident Jody, who underwent a medical procedure. Goodrich says this type of personal post gets “deeper engagement” from the community.It’s no surprise that people love babies too. “Of course baby chimp videos are also successful,” says Vélez del Burgo Guinea.Lines adds that videos of gorilla births do well. The organization uses these videos as an opportunity to educate. A video post showing a mother gorilla cuddling her infant states: “When you only have 1,000 individuals left, each mountain gorilla birth is so important to the future of the species.”Videos of baby animals play well on social media. Conservation groups work to make sure posts like this also send a deeper message about apes.The bad and the uglySome posts are more successful than others, but what’s good for social media isn’t always good for apes, says Goodrich. For instance, “it’s super problematic when humans are interacting with the apes, but it’s really popular.” She calls out one offender, which she describes as a “road-side zoo” in Florida. Goodrich says the organization is “good at social media,” but its posts, which she says often show guests interacting with apes like chimps, may give its followers the wrong impression about the animals. Jory agrees that posts of humans interacting with the apes can be problematic and says the only time BCI staff are in contact with bonobos is in rescue situations.Goodrich also acknowledges that “cutesy” posts are often popular on social media, but adds that “some things that end up being popular aren’t exactly how we want to portray our animals.” In the case of Foxie, the chimpanzee who loves trolls, context was important and so the organization provided  viewers with background information to help understand Foxie and her trolls. “If there’s no context around it, they might think, ‘how cute — wouldn’t a chimpanzee make a great pet?’”According to Jory, BCI’s work benefits from the fact that bonobos are so similar to humans. She notes that photos of the apes looking at the photographer with both eyes visible are popular. “Those are the photos people connect with the most because they’re so human-like,” she says. “I think that makes people want to connect. I do think it helps our cause that bonobos are so closely related to humans.”Baby chimps like Mussa — made famous by video of his rescue flight — capture hearts on social media. But this cute appeal also puts them at risk of trafficking.Vélez del Burgo Guinea agrees that great ape conservation might get a bit of a boost because of the animals’ similarities to humans.“Yes, it is true that chimpanzees for their humanlike traits create more empathy in people,” she says. “We see it also in the differences in likes when we put a pic of other primates (monkeys) compared with the pics of chimps.”But Vélez del Burgo Guinea says this anthropomorphizing can also have a downside.“It is a problem because it is one of the reasons people wants chimps as pets — they see the babies are so cute and they want to hold them,” she says. “But they don’t understand that chimps, when they grow, they become very strong and because of their trauma and isolation they are very aggressive. An adult chimpanzee can easily kill a person. This is why when they grow up they end up locked in a cage. People don’t know what to do with them anymore.”This is where social media can come in handy, she says. “Through the stories of our chimps, they become ambassadors of the ones in the wild and people understand that to have a baby chimp there is a full family who would die.”Goodrich isn’t so sure about how much great apes actually benefit from their close lineage to humans. She says, for instance, that bats are also very popular on some social media pages. “I would guess that some people are interested in bats and some are interested in chimpanzees.”A spokesperson from the Fossey Fund agrees, saying that while the close connection to humans certainly gives great ape organizations “a different advantage,” there are other charismatic species like tigers and pandas that “capture people’s hearts.”The ultimate goal of viral social media posts is to help save apes, like this wild chimpanzee feeding on canopy fruit. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerSaving species still the main goalMost organizations emphasize that social media is a means to an end. And while likes, shares and comments are welcome, the ultimate goal is to build awareness and support for species with dwindling wild populations.“If we don’t react soon,” says Vélez del Burgo Guinea, “we will lose our closest relatives.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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