Donations Help Buy Grave Marker for CO Paramedic

first_imgPaul Cary (Photo provided by Ambulnz) Paul Cary died within a month of arriving to the COVID hotspot. His body was carried back to Colorado in a large procession of ambulances to be laid to rest. A retired Aurora (CO) firefighter/paramedic who volunteered to fight COVID-19 in New York City and lost his life to the virus now has a permanent memorial. His grave was adorned with a plastic marker.center_img Cary’s friends and co-workers launched a GoFundMe campaign earlier this year, raising $6,000 for a proper headstone. “Paul was a great person. He sacrificed his entire life from beginning to end for EMS and fire in this community, so he deserves to be paid tribute appropriately,” said Alexander James, a co-worker with Ambulanz, told The Denver Channel. “He was a front line hero.”last_img read more

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Vespers offers alternate form of prayer

first_imgEvery month, the McGrath Institute for Church Life holds vespers, an evening prayer service in the chapel in Geddes Hall. John Cavadini, a professor of theology and the director of the institute, explained that Vespers is part of the church’s ongoing Liturgy of the Hours.“Liturgy of the Hours refers to the daily prayers of the Church,” Cavadini said. “The two hinges of Liturgy of the Hours is morning prayers, which is called Lauds, and evening prayers, which is called Vespers.”Cavadini discussed the other Liturgy of the Hours as well. There is mid-morning, noon and mid-afternoon prayers in addition to lauds and vespers. The idea behind Liturgy of the Hours, Cavadini said, is to “sanctify the day.” Since Mass can be held at any time of the day, it is independent of the Liturgy of the Hours. Vespers, in particular, centers around the Book of Psalms.“There are three psalms every day on a four-week cycle. You’ll go through the whole book of Psalms in four weeks,” Cavaldini said. “There are special psalms for feast days.”According to a program for a normal service from the McGrath Institute, vespers opens with a prayer, is followed by a hymn, which in turn is followed by a psalm, then a canticle. Next, there is a short Bible reading and a homily. In the final part of the service, the congregation sings a canticle and the “Magnificat,” or song of Mary. The congregation offers intercessions, recites the Lord’s Prayer, then says an additional prayer before the service is brought to a close.Cavadini explained that vespers is different than a usual Mass in that laypeople can preach the homily.“Laypeople can give the homily at the Liturgy of the Hours. We have lots of different people whose voices you hear,” Cavadini said. “It’s nice to get a wide range of voices from students, faculty, staff, etc. It’s sort of fun to hear and to be asked to deliver one.”Carolyn Pirtle, the director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy, said vespers services have been happening on campus for a long time.“We’ve been doing monthly vespers services for a number of years now. We’ve made a real effort to bring this form of prayer to the campus community,” Pirtle said. “It’s a beautiful form of prayer that incorporates the psalms and scriptures. We wanted to try and bring this to a wider audience.”From a logistical perspective, Pirtle said the readings and the psalms are laid out for the entire church, much in the same way Mass readings are. It’s simply a matter of figuring out what day it is and what psalms and readings correspond to that day. Pirtle said that this uniformity is a “beautiful symbol of the unity of the church,” since everyone throughout the world is saying the same prayers. She also noted that evening prayer services date back to the very beginning of the Christian church. She emphasized the importance of the psalms to the service.“The psalms are beautiful because they speak to the breadth of the human experience,” Pirtle said. “They speak to the joy of joys and the worst of sorrows. Whatever you’re going through, there’s a psalm for that.”Since laypeople can preach, Pirtle also said that it’s a great opportunity for masters of divinity students to practice preaching.“Traditionally, we’ve had a lot of masters of divinity students preaching,” she said. “I’ve drawn from that community so that they can learn how to preside and practice that as a lay person. It’s a great chance to exercise ministerial leadership.”Pirtle emphasized the beauty of vespers and its benefits in a stressful environment.“If you’ve never experienced vespers, it’s a really beautiful form of prayer that’s very reflective and very contemplative,” she said. “It’s a wonderful way to take half an hour away from the stress and busyness of student life to come and spend some time with God and let God speak to you through the scripture and the psalms, as well as enter into a community of people who you might not know through prayer and the grace of spirit.”Tags: Liturgy of the Hours, McGrath Institute for Church Life, prayer, Vesperslast_img read more

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DEATHS NOTICES: May 21, 2020

first_img Geraldine Jason Dipmore, 77, formerly of Port Arthur died Tuesday, May 19, 2020. Funeral arrangements are pending at Gabriel Funeral Home.Mary Chilo, 89, of Port Arthur died Wednesday, May 20, 2020. Funeral arrangements are pending at Gabriel Funeral Home.Christopher Roccaforte, 39, of Port Arthur, Texas died Thursday, May 21, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves, TX. Jerome Burleson, 77, of Allen, Texas died Sunday, May 17, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves.Antonio “Tony” Perello, Jr., 69, of Houston, Texas died Saturday, May 16, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves. Reverend Thomas “T.J.” Sasser, 101, of Port Neches, Texas died May 19, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Port Neches.Melvin LeBlanc, 65, of Beaumont, TX died Thursday, May 21, 2020. Services are pending at Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.Taylor Rodriguez, 23, of Port Arthur died Wednesday, May 13, 2020. Funeral arrangements are pending at Gabriel Funeral Home.last_img read more

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National Life makes the grade, bond rating boosted by S&P to ‘A+’

first_imgNational Life Group,Vermont Business Magazine The financial strength rating for National Life Group’s insurance companies was boosted by Standard & Poor’s on Thursday based on the company’s improved capital strength and stronger credit quality. S&P Global Ratings formally raised the rating of National Life Insurance Company and Life Insurance Company of the Southwest to “A+” from “A.” At the same time, SP Global raised its issuer credit rating on NLV Financial Corp., National Life’s holding company, to “BBB+” from “BBB.”“We’re delighted we’re being recognized by S&P for the financial strength of our 167-year-old company,” said Mehran Assadi, president and CEO of National Life Group.S&P praised National Life’s focus on the fundamentals. “The upgrade reflects our view that NL Group has improved its capital strength, resulting in stronger credit quality,” S&P said.“We now view the insurer’s financial risk profile as extremely strong, compared to our prior opinion of very strong. Over the past few years, NL Group has organically grown its capital, more effectively managed its investments in structured securities, and successfully completed a closed block reinsurance transaction. We believe its improved capital position is sustainable.”S&P said National Life’s “business risk profile remains strong” and noted that premiums and deposits are almost evenly split between protection and retirement savings.The outlook by S&P was listed as stable and “reflects our expectation that NL Group will maintain its strong business risk profile encompassing engaged and  productive distribution and favorable operating performance.”Source: National Life 8.12.2016 NationalLife.com(link is external).last_img read more

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Retiring Sen. Kay Wolf leads Overland Park Chamber’s 2016 voting records

first_imgSen. Kay Wolf is stepping down after one term in the high chamber.Retiring Prairie Village Sen. Kay Wolf earned a perfect score from the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce in its assessment of local legislators’ voting records this yearIssued each year, the chamber’s voting records assess how legislators’ voting records helped support the legislative priorities of the chamber, which seek to keep Johnson County a thriving business community.“Many of the issues that impact the business community are decided in the halls of government,” Tom Robinett, Vice President of Government Affairs for the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce, said in a release accompanying the new report. “For this reason, pro-business advocacy is one of the most important services the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce provides to our community.”Wolf’s 100 percent record from 2016 contributed to her lifetime voting record of 92 percent with the chamber, the highest among the 34 legislators rated by the organization, which is the largest chamber of commerce in Johnson County.Northeast Johnson County Reps. Barbara Bollier (91 percent), Stephanie Clayton (91 percent), Jarrod Ousley (82 percent), and Melissa Rooker (91 percent) fared well in the analysis as well.The worst rating went to Rep. Craig McPherson who was judged to have voted in the chamber’s interest 36 percent of the time. Reps. Amanda Grosserode, Mike Kiegerl, Jerry Lunn, Charles Macheers, Randy Powell, John Rubin and Bill Sutton were all judged to have voted with the chamber less than half of the time, as well. Mary Pilcher-Cook was the lowest-rated local member of the Senate, coming in at 50 percent.The full report is embedded below:https://dfv6pkw99pxmo.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/25133653/2016-Voting-Record.pdflast_img read more

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Key credit union bill passes in final hours

first_imgby. Henry MeierGreetings from Saratoga Springs!  The frenzy that characterizes the final hours of New York’s Legislative Session lived up to expectations again this year.  In fact, the Senate is expected to reconvene this morning to pass some additional measures.  Here’s a look at some of the key legislation that may impact your credit union’s operation.  Remember that none of these bills have been signed by the Governor yet.A9408/S7112 Field of Membership Bill:  This bill gives state chartered credit unions more flexibility in developing their fields of membership.  For example, an employee-based credit union would be able to apply for permission to extend membership to persons who live in the community in which it operates.  Similar legislation was vetoed last year by the Governor.  This year’s bill was amended to address the Governor’s concerns.  For example, any membership modifications are subject to the approval of the Department of Financial Services.  I’m sure I’ll be telling you more about this bill in the months ahead.A9037-a/S6905-b Prize Linked Savings Program:  This bill passed both Houses earlier this session and allows credit unions and banks to offer lotteries as an incentive to open savings accounts.  The initiative has been successful in other states and, if it is approved by the Governor, may provide innovative ways of encouraging people to invest their lottery money rather than throw it away.A8106-c/S5885-b Modifications to the Wage-Theft Prevention Act:  One of the most obnoxious mandates New York State has imposed on employers in recent years is the requirement that they provide employees with an annual written notice of their salary.  In the closing hours of the Senate, common sense prevailed and a bill was passed eliminating the annual notice requirements.  Great job by the Legislature for being willing to take a second look at one of its laws. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Daily Postcard: Large Bruin Samples Cart Contents

first_imgDaily Postcard: Large bruin samples trash cart contents around 2:15 p.m. Wednesday in the Western Area. Animal Control and Los Alamos Police responded to the area, but the results of their interaction with the bear are as yet unknown. According to reference.com, ‘Bruin was the name of the bear character in the tales of Reynard the Fox, which were popular in the Middle Ages.’ Photo by Brint PereraMidafternoon snack. Photo by Brint Pereralast_img

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House prices continue to ‘slow’

first_imgAccording to its latest monthly survey, prices across the UK fell by 0.3% in February, taking the annual rate of inflation down from 4.5% to 4.2%. That means the average UK home now costs £196,649, according to the Halifax’s calculations. It said prices would be flat over the coming year if the economy and employment continued to grow. ‘House prices fell by 0.3% in February. Prices in the three months to February, however, were marginally (0.2%) higher than in the previous quarter,’ said Martin Ellis, the Halifax’s chief economist told the BBC. ‘Whilst the housing market has slowed over the past six months, it is supported by sound economic fundamentals. ‘Interest rate cuts by the Bank of England are also helping to underpin house prices,’ he added.last_img read more

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Public sector property task

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Linde to supply hydrogen gas to Shell Oil

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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