Londoners face the biggest rise in council tax bills as rates set to rise from April

first_img Share Read more: Sadiq Khan gets green light to increase council tax to tackle violent crimeBills in greater London will see a rise of 5.1 per cent, higher than any other region, although London’s council tax remains lower than the rest of England’s.Cipfa’s council tax survey was based on the results of a questionnaire sent to local authorities that saw 312 respondents in England, out of which 301 said they will be increasing their council tax rates.There are large discrepancies between the regions, however.Londoners will pay on average £1,476 in 2019/20, CIPFA said. The next cheapest bill will be in the west Midlands, at £1,732. The north east will pay the most, at £1,884. The tax hike will be the second biggest in 10 years, after last year’s average rise of 5.1 per cent.Cipfa chief executive Rob Whiteman called the rises “a reflection of the incredible fiscal pressure faced by local authorities and police”.Read more: Government delays Financial Services Bill vote in tax havens dispute“Local authorities have faced the most significant cuts to spending over the last ten years, and despite the government’s announcement that austerity is ending, for local authorities this is clearly not the case”, he added. “Long term they remain in an unsustainable position.”“Council tax is regressive, and increasingly divorced from the reality of property values”, he said. Tuesday 5 March 2019 2:23 pm Council tax bills across England are set to rise by an average of 4.5 per cent from April, with the steepest hike coming in London, new research suggests.From the start of the financial year in April, households across Britain will see an average increase of £75.60 in the yearly Band D council tax bill, according to a new survey carried out by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (Cipfa). Tags: Trading Archive whatsapp whatsapp Harry Robertson Londoners face the biggest rise in council tax bills as rates set to rise from April last_img read more

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National divide on whether there’s a problem with voting security reflected in Alaska proposals

first_imgElection Coverage | Politics | Southcentral | State GovernmentNational divide on whether there’s a problem with voting security reflected in Alaska proposalsApril 28, 2021 by Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO and Alaska Public Media Share:A voter mails an absentee ballot in October 2020. Bills proposed in the Alaska Senate and House this year would overhaul the state’s voting system. (Lex Treinen/Alaska Public Media)A national divide over how voters cast ballots has been reflected in the reactions to bills related to voter laws introduced in the Alaska Legislature this year. A Republican senator has proposed a bill he said would make elections more secure. But it’s raising concerns among advocates for making it easier to vote. They favor a bill proposed by a Democratic House member. When it comes to any potential changes to Alaska’s voting laws, passions are running high. Senators recently heard that firsthand, during public testimony on voting legislation, including from Pamela Samash of Nenana. “What makes America great is that we can vote,” she said. “But it’s worthless if it’s not a fair vote.  And I don’t believe at all that last election was fair at all. I think it was completely rigged.”Sen. Mike Shower, R-Wasilla, at a committee hearing this year. (Photo by Skip Gray/KTOO)Wasilla Republican Sen. Mike Shower said he knows many voters have lost trust in the system and so he’s focused on improving the integrity of Alaska’s elections. “This is a critical issue for the state and the country, that the citizenry gets back to a point where they can accept the election results,” he said.Shower introduced a bill that would make many changes to how Alaskans vote, including introducing new technology in the form of something called “multi-factor authentication.” An example of this is when websites send users a code to their email or cellphone in addition to requiring their password to allow access. ‘“We’re trying to drive ourselves to the point where we get into the 21st century, so that we use available technology to secure our elections, while making sure that we’re not putting up obstacles to people to actually be able to register and vote,” he said.The measure, Senate Bill 39, also would require something similar to the blockchain technology used for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Other elements of the bill would add a potential penalty related to the requirement over who can witness voter signatures on absentee ballot envelopes. Currently, witnesses can be an official qualified to administer oaths. But if the voter believes that an official isn’t “reasonably accessible,” they can use any adult as a witness. Under the bill, a voter would commit perjury if they used a nonofficial as a witness when an official was available. The bill would bar people from soliciting to help others mail their ballots, and would prohibit people from assisting mailing in more than six ballots. Shower has said he wants to prevent people who are paid to mail ballots. And it would require municipalities that use the state registry of voters in their elections to also have multi-factor authentication. People who want to make it easier to vote in Alaska have concerns about the bill. They include Celeste Hodge Growden, the president of the Alaska Black Caucus, which advocates for Black Alaskans. She said adding multi-factor authentication would add an unnecessary step when there isn’t evidence of voter fraud in the state.“I don’t see it being a problem here, and so why introduce legislation that makes it seems like there are issues when there really isn’t?” she said.Hodge Growden said she believes some of the proposals in the bill are forms of voter suppression, especially the parts that could make it harder to help people mail-in ballots or find witnesses. “The Alaska Black Caucus will do everything in its power to make sure it doesn’t become law,” she said. “We will no longer sit idly by.”Shower has vehemently denied accusations of suppression, saying that his bill is intended to increase trust and includes some provisions making it easier to vote, like allowing voters to apply to receive mail-in ballots permanently.Hodge Growden isn’t alone in having doubts about the Senate bill. Kendra Kloster, the executive director for Native Peoples Action Community Fund, is also concerned. Her nonpartisan organization advocates for the well-being of Alaska Natives and encourages voting. She said that changes to who can help voters mail-in ballots could prevent the kinds of help voters received last year when the pandemic made it difficult or dangerous for some people to return their ballots. “We heard through this last election cycle communities really coming together, and tribal leaders and tribes working to help during COVID of course — when people were often staying home or in quarantine or in lockdowns — on how we could help get ballots,”  he said.  She also noted that Shower has emphasized provisions of the bill that would encourage the Division of Elections to use more databases to update its records. The state has an unusually large number of people living outside of the state who remain enrolled in Alaska — there are 585,961 registered voters and only an estimated 525,000 eligible voters. In part, that’s because state law allows people to remain registered here as long as they plan to return and do not register to vote elsewhere. But Kloster said the division could make progress on cleaning up its voting rolls without many of the proposals in the Senate bill. She does like other provisions recently added to the bill, like the one allowing voters to apply to permanently receive mail-in ballots. It also would allow voters to fix errors on mail-in ballot envelopes that the Division of Elections finds that would prevent their vote from counting. This is allowed in some municipal elections but not in state elections.Kloster offered support for a provision in the bill that would add tribal IDs to the list of forms of identification the division must accept. But she’s disappointed the bill would drop hunting and fishing licenses from that list. Both Kloster and Hodge Growden prefer a different piece of legislation, House Bill 66, sponsored by Anchorage Democratic Rep. Chris Tuck.It would provide a way for voters to apply to permanently receive ballots to vote by mail and for ballot curing. It would also allow voters to register and vote on Election Day, which makes it easier to vote, though their ballots won’t count until after the Division of Elections checks their eligibility. It would raise the pay of election workers, locking in the $3 per hour increase the division issued last year as an emergency measure during the pandemic. And it calls for the state to provide postage to cover the costs of mailing in ballots. House Bill 66 is scheduled for a hearing in the House State Affairs Committee on Thursday. Senate Bill 39 is being considered by the Senate State Affairs Committee. State officials haven’t estimated the potential cost if either bill became law. In addition to those bills, lawmakers are considering Senate Bill 83, introduced by Lt. Gov. Kevin Meyer, who oversees the Division of Elections. Meyer’s bill would make smaller changes to the state’s election system.  It would expand the division’s ability to audit election results. And it would allow entirely by-mail elections in communities of less than 750 residents, if the division is unable to hire election workers. Meyer said it’s been a long-running challenge to recruit election workers in some villages.Meyer said last year’s election went well in Alaska. He noted that some voters raised concerns about the effect of the vote-counting machines made by Dominion Voting Systems. But he said a statewide hand count of the Ballot Measure 2 results confirmed that the initial count was accurate. “You know, having just gone through it, I think there’s enough check-and-balances in place that people should feel good about the elections, and the outcomes,” he said. Meyer also noted that the larger House and Senate proposed bills would go into effect for next year’s election. He said it already will be a challenge to conduct the election without any major changes from these bills. That’s because there’s already a large overhaul to election laws from Ballot Measure 2, and the scheduled launch of new election maps from the census. He said the Division of Elections should be able to give lawmakers input on what it would take to implement any major changes to elections. While the House and Senate bills have some things in common, Kloster said they represent two different approaches to voting. And with the legislative session ending by May 19, there isn’t much time to resolve the differences this year. Share this story:last_img read more

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Generous tips continue nearly a year after Sanibel bartender’s passing

first_imgEstero’s one-of-a-kind service horse and owner spread smiles June 7, 2021 Advertisement Former NYPD officer finds unexpected joy patrolling Fort Myers elementary school June 17, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Story2Share Retired teacher hopes to empower students with swim around Key West June 14, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS In 2020, more than nearly $50,000 has been raised through “Put It On Pete’s Tab”. For those interested in donating or in need of assistance through the non-profit, more information can be found here. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Clewiston High School senior surprises crowd with generosity at graduation June 9, 2021 The restaurant receipts started popping up around Southwest Florida on social media with a mysterious message: Put it on Pete’s Tab. Each bill was accompanied by a generous tip, but left many servers wondering “Who is Pete?”For those who did know Pete O’Brien – or even just met him once – he was an unforgettable guy. O’Brien spent most of his life as a bartender and passed away suddenly in March after a quick illness that started with an ear infection. Soon after his death, O’Brien’s family and friends came up with a way to honor the man they knew by starting a foundation in his name. “It turned into its own thing,” said Emily Iafrate, O’Brien’s sister.  AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementBecause O’Brien was known for his generosity in tipping servers at restaurants, even though he lived a modest life of his own, people began leaving large tips in O’Brien’s name. Now, the “Put It On Pete’s Tab” foundation provides financial relief for servers and bartenders struggling to make ends meet. Marisa Scolaro, a Cape Coral-based bartender, received more than $1,000 for rent and bills. “You kind of lose your faith in humanity a little bit, but then people like this come around and they’re helping a lot,” Scolaro said.  Advertisementlast_img read more

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‘We need to stand up to online bullying’ says Laois politician

first_imgHome News ‘We need to stand up to online bullying’ says Laois politician NewsPolitics Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Previous articleWeekend Read: An examination of the Laois Link to the Orange Order as July 12 approachesNext articleProperty Watch: Five houses currently for sale in Portlaoise for around €200,000 Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. ‘We need to stand up to online bullying’ says Laois politician Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook By Steven Miller – 5th July 2020 TAGSFine GaelMy Life in PoliticsThomasina Connell Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role Having first contested the 2016 General Election, she was elected to Laois County Council in last year’s Local Elections in the Portlaoise Municipal District.She also addresses how she has been managing the new role, as well as running her own solicitor’s practice in Portlaoise.“It can be a huge shock to those who run for the first time, when they discover what is required.“I will always respect anyone who puts their name on a ballot paper, no matter what political background they have.”Cllr Connell’s Fine Gael colleagues – former Minister and Laois TD Charlie Flanagan and former Offaly TD Marcella Corcoran-Kennedy – have also addressed the issue of social media abuse.Marcella Corcoran-Kennedy, hit out at “trolls on social media” prior to this year’s General Election said “politics has become very toxic of late” and that “social media has tried and tried and tried to drag us into the sewer with them”.You can read the full My Life in Politics interview with Cllr Thomasina Connell on LaoisToday on Monday.SEE ALSO – No place for Stanley as Sinn Fein announce new front bench Pinterestcenter_img Electric Picnic WhatsApp Facebook Portlaoise-based solicitor Thomasina Connell says that people “need to stand up to online bullying” and that the “constant abuse of elected reps” will turn many potentially good politicians away from running for election.Speaking in this week’s My Life in Politics interview on LaoisToday she addresses the issue of abuse that politicans are subjected to, particularly on social media.“I believe we need to stand up to online bullying always, and don’t see why elected reps – be they Councillors/TDs, Ministers etc should be subjected to such abhorrent abuse,” the Fine Gael councillor says in the interview.“Thankfully, in my experience, people are mostly kind and interested to reach out.“It often occurs to me that as a result of the constant abuse of our elected reps, really good people who would make fine politicians, will potentially choose an alternative career path.” News WhatsApp Electric Picnic Pinterest Twitter Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival datelast_img read more

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Value of Canadian M&A activity surges in Q4 2015

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Global M&A sets Q1 record, Refinitiv says This increase in overall deal value was driven by several very large transactions. Crosbie reports that there were 17 deals valued at least $1 billion in Q4 2015, with a total value of $119 billion. This includes Canadian Pacific Railway Co.’s $50.3 billion offer to acquire Norfolk Southern Corp. In the same quarter a year earlier, there were 14 deals valued at least $1 billion, totalling $90 billion. “Robust activity at the top end of the market has overshadowed a narrowing of core domestic M&A activity,” says Richard Betsalel, managing director at Crosbie in a statement. Indeed, the firm reports that there were just 435 domestic transactions in the quarter, valued at $20 billion, down from 454 deals worth $66 billion in Q4 2014. “The one bright light in the quarter was Canadian companies remaining active making acquisitions abroad,” Betsalel adds. Crosbie reports that Canadian companies made 153 acquisitions of foreign targets in Q4 2015, valued at $106 billion, vs 185 transactions valued at $42 billion in the same quarter in 2014. “The 15% depreciation in the Canadian dollar vs the U.S. dollar in 2015 has not deterred Canadian companies from making foreign acquisitions,” Betsalel notes. “Pension funds and private equity groups led the charge acquiring long-lived infrastructure and real estate assets as they seek to increase their exposure to assets that generate stable inflation-protected returns in higher growth markets.” Crosbie reports that real estate was the most active sector in the fourth quarter, with 101 transactions, down from 116 transactions in Q4 2014. Meanwhile, deals activity in the energy sector remained weak, with just 65 transactions valued at $11.5 billion in Q4 2015 compared with 75 deals valued at $52.1 billion in Q4 2014. “With oil continuing its slide below US$30 per barrel, buyers in the energy sector have moved to the sidelines,” Betsalel says. “We expect those buyers to remain cautious until oil prices exhibit some degree of stability or distressed companies are forced into selling assets at fire-sale prices.” Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Record M&A activity in Q1, Crosbie & Co. says BMO asset management sale is on strategy: Moody’scenter_img James Langton Several mega deals pushed the value of Canadian mergers and acquisition (M&A) activity to almost record levels in the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2015, masking an underlying weakness in deal flow, according to a new report from Toronto-based investment bank Crosbie & Co. Crosbie reports that there were 643 M&A deal announcements in Q4 2015, down from 705 deals in the same quarter a year earlier, representing the lowest level of deal activity in the past two years. However, the value of the deals in Q4 2015 was $137 billion, up from $116 billion in Q4 2014. Keywords Mergers and acquisitions Related newslast_img read more

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OSFI proposes rules to recover costs of overseeing PRPPs

first_img Keywords PRPPs James Langton Specifically, the proposed amendments would set the formula for OSFI to recover the cost of overseeing PRPPs. The existing regulations prescribe the formula used to determine the annual assessments for private pension plans, but do not include provisions for recovering expenses from PRPPs, which are a new pension option. OSFI’s expenses from overseeing federally regulated plans are fully recovered from pension plans. The proposed changes, which were published for comment in the latest edition of the Canada Gazette, would amend the rules to permit the annual assessment of PRPPs on the same basis as other private pension plans. “In developing the proposed assessment method for PRPPs, it was determined that supervisory costs for PRPPs are expected to be similar to the supervisory costs for defined-contribution [pension] plans,” the proposals note, adding that the rules aim to put these plans on a level playing field with other private plans. However, this approach will be re-examined against actual experience in the future, the proposed amendments state: “It is intended that expenses incurred in relation to the administration of the PRPP Act will be tracked to determine if experience indicates that a revision to the assessment methodology for PRPPs should be considered.” Separately, Saskatchewan announced that it has entered into a multilateral agreement with the federal government — along with British Columbia, Quebec and Nova Scotia — that simplifies the licensing and registration process for PRPPs. “[PRPPs] will provide Saskatchewan workers with another option to save money for retirement,” said the province’s justice minister and attorney general, Gordon Wyant, in a statement. “These plans will be very accessible and will be offered at a low cost to plan members. I am pleased that Saskatchewan is able to be part of a multilateral agreement, which will pave the way for employers to set up a [PRPP] for their employees.” Photo copyright: convisum/123RF The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) is proposing regulatory amendments to pension rules that will enable the federal regulator to fund the oversight of pooled registered pension plans (PRPPs). Ontario’s new public sector pension manager comes into effect Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Managing risk: Active vs passive investing

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Richard Jenkins Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:45Loaded: 0.00%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -3:45 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Arcep changes stance on France consolidation

first_img Español AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 22 MAY 2018 France’s telecoms regulator is open to the idea of consolidation in the country’s competitive mobile market, its chief Sebastien Soriano said, in what appears to be an about-turn from past policy.In an interview with Le Monde, Soriano said Arcep is not against consolidation provided operators “have a value-creating project for the country, and not for shareholders only.”He gave the example of the Sprint, T-Mobile US merger in the US, which he said could lead to higher investments in 5G.France currently operates with four major operators (Orange, SFR, Free and Bouygues Telecom) and consolidation attempts in the past have failed due to stringent regulation.A report in October 2017 stated that since Orange’s failed bid to merge with Bouygues Telecom in early 2016, the dynamics of the market had changed and companies were now looking to explore other avenues to improve their position rather than engage in M&A activity.In March, Arcep announced it would remain “very vigilant” if any M&A between the country’s operators was attempted.The interview with Soriano coincides with a report by Arcep stating operators in France invested €9.6 billion in 2017, €660 million more than the previous year (excluding spending on frequencies).“Two years ago, I asked operators to break open their piggy banks, to rise to national coverage challenges, and enable France to catch up on the connectivity front. With an investment of €9.6 billion, we are seeing the sector’s growing commitment to making up for lost time, and coming in line with the country’s infrastructure needs,” Soriano said in a statement.Public consultation on 5GIn a bid to boost 5G efforts, Arcep also launched a public consultation on making the 26GHz band available to kick-start 5G rollouts.The regulator explained in a statement that to satisfy very high capacity and very low latency imperatives, 5G will need “to use frequencies well above the highest ones being employed today, [for example] in the mmWave bands above 24GHz.”“In Europe, the Radio Spectrum Policy Group identified the 26GHz band as the pioneer band in this range of mmWave frequencies, for a maiden use of the band before 2020,” the regulator added.The public consultation will run until 18 June. Home Arcep changes stance on France consolidation Orange pilots software-centric service in R&D push Saleha Riaz Tags France mulls tighter smartphone sale rulescenter_img Related Author Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters – creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews…More Read more Previous ArticleSony focuses on content, premium hardwareNext ArticleEurope behind on small cells as 5G nears Cellnex compra las torres de Altice por 5.200 millones ARCEPFrancelast_img read more

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Mullaghderg search called off

first_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook Mullaghderg search called off RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th By News Highland – June 10, 2019 Twitter Facebook Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Pinterest Homepage BannerNewscenter_img Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleLetterkenny is the eighth cleanest town in Ireland – IBALNext articleCanadian bones confirmed to be from Sligo famine ship News Highland A search operation in the Mullaghderg area involving Bunbeg Coastguard and Arranmore Lifeboat was stood down last evening after nothing was found. Sligo-based Coastguard helicopter, Rescue 118 also joined the search for a time.There had been reports of a surfer possibly being missing, and that sparked the alert. However, that was not the case. Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more

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Morris Brown College: A Look At Interim President’s First 6 Months On The Job

first_img 3:49 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE Morris Brown’s interim president, Dr. Kevin James, talked with “Morning Edition” host Lisa Rayam about his first six months on the job and future goals for the college. A large picture of the former staff and supporters to what was then called Atlanta University. The photo is in front of Fountain Hall. Fountain Hall is on the National Registry of historic landmarks. MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE A large picture of the former staff and supporters to what was then called Atlanta University. The photo is in front of Fountain Hall. Fountain Hall is on the National Registry of historic landmarks. Morris Brown’s interim president, Dr. Kevin James, talked with “Morning Edition” host Lisa Rayam about his first six months on the job and future goals for the college. A look at the exterior of the Morris Brown College multi-purpose complex. This is the main building on campus for administration, faculty, staff and students. ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE A large picture of the former staff and supporters to what was then called Atlanta University. The photo is in front of Fountain Hall. Fountain Hall is on the National Registry of historic landmarks. Many would say the most iconic image of Morris Brown College is the facade of Fountain Hall.The red brick building is three stories tall and has a graceful clock tower rising up from its center.Fountain Hall is 137 years old, and it’s a National Historic Landmark.It’s also in disrepair and unoccupied.That mirrors the fate of Morris Brown itself, which lost its accreditation in 2002 and now enrolls just a few dozen students.But the college just got a $500,000 grant to restore Fountain Hall. And it has a new interim president, Dr. Kevin James.“Morning Edition” host Lisa Rayam went to the campus of Morris Brown to talk with him about his first six months on the job. Sharecenter_img MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE A look at the exterior of the Morris Brown College multi-purpose complex. This is the main building on campus for administration, faculty, staff and students. Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE 1234 A sculpture facing the multi-purpose complex represents students studying and enhancing their education. Morris Brown is the only college in Georgia founded by African Americans. MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE Related Stories A sculpture facing the multi-purpose complex represents students studying and enhancing their education. Morris Brown is the only college in Georgia founded by African Americans. MARIA WHITE TILLMAN / WABE For Whom The Bell Rings last_img read more

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