FTSE 100 closes flat while Wall Street rally loses steam

first_imgThe so-called meme stock has made a round-trip from $65 to a an intra-high of north of $480 and is now trading under $50 in just 12 trading sessions. Now the benchmark S&P index is trading down 0.13 per cent while the Dow Jones slipped 33 points to 31,352 points. The tech-heavy Nasdaq edged 0.16 per cent higher to break through 14,000. Tags: Company FTSE 100 FTSE 100 FTSE 250 HSBC Holdings JD Sports Fashion Ocado Group Standard Chartered “Ocado still needs to deliver on profit but it is getting closer, with losses narrowing significantly. It has faced teething problems, sometimes struggling to keep up with demand but for the most part it has coped with the rapid shifts in customer purchasing patterns over the last 12 months.” Underlying profit of £148m was well ahead of forecasts and an increase in average order size helped sales rise 35 per cent, offsetting a drop in customer numbers from 795,000 to 680,000. London’s main market was dragged down by BT’s heavy fall. (AFP via Getty Images) Earlier this morning Bitcoin hit a new record high of $48,216 before inching back to trade up nearly nine per cent at $46,915 by 5pm. Oil prices reached new records earlier today, climbing to a 13 month high due to a combination of supply cuts by major producers and optimism over a recovery in fuel demand support energy markets. Ocado reported a sharp rise in sales and profits but slipped two per cent as customers number dropped despite reporting a sharp rise in sales and profits. London’s blue-chip index closed 0.12 per cent higher as sterling rose to a near three-month high, largely because the dollar floundered as investors eyed a large stimulus package on the horizon. Ocado warned that the impact of the pandemic on grocery shopping habits is permanent. London’s main market was dragged down by BT’s heavy fall. (AFP via Getty Images) Also Read: FTSE 100 closes flat while Wall Street rally loses steam Bitcoin’s rally has continued into its second day following news that Elon Musk’s Tesla has pumped $1.5bn into the cryptocurrency and the electric carmaker announced it would start taking it as payment. Read more: BREAKING: Bitcoin pushes past $48,000 to new record high The online grocer closed down 1.68 per cent. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailBrake For It40 New Features In The 2021 Ford BroncoBrake For ItMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comNational Penny For Seniors7 Discounts Seniors Only Get If They AskNational Penny For SeniorsMoney PopThe Most Overpriced Vehicles On the Market Right NowMoney PopBleacherBreaker41 Old Toys That Are Worth More Than Your HouseBleacherBreakerTaco RelishSuspicious Pics That Are Fishier Than The SeaTaco RelishExplored Planet30 Things Not To Do While Traveling InternationallyExplored Planetcenter_img The Gamestop mania however seems to be coming to an end, with shares plummeting more than 16 per cent as the fear associated with short squeezes dissipate. Mining firm Evraz and consumer credit company Experian were the FTSE’s biggest fallers this afternoon, both dropping 2.8 per cent. Ocado slips as customer numbers fall “These changes are great news for Ocado which has positioned itself right at the centre of the transition in the supermarket sector,” Russ Mould, AJ Bell’s investment director said. FTSE 100 closes flat while Wall Street rally loses steam Wall Street falters after hitting fresh highs Show Comments ▼ Share Damian Shepherd and Angharad Carrick The FTSE 100 closed flat on Tuesday afternoon while Wall Street retreated on the back off a record session yesterday. whatsapp Tuesday 9 February 2021 5:06 pm The FTSE 250 closed up just 0.13 per cent. Wall Street was experiencing somewhat of a hangover from Monday’s record highs. The S&P broke through 3,900 and the Nasdaq closed within a few points of 14,000. whatsapplast_img read more

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Ecosystem study unlocks the mystery of black cod survival

first_imgFisheries | Oceans | Science & Tech | SoutheastEcosystem study unlocks the mystery of black cod survivalJuly 18, 2017 by Robert Wollsey, KCAW-Sitka Share:A juvenile black cod is tagged and released back into the ocean. (Photo courtesy NOAA)Over the past couple of decades black cod — or sablefish — has become one of Southeast Alaska’s most commercially important species.Longliners target them in deep waters off the continental shelf, during the same season as halibut.Although stocks are strong, biologists don’t fully grasp black cod population ecology. A research partnership in Sitka hopes to change that.Alaska Fisheries Science Center’s Jamal Moss of the  is spearheading to better understand black cod.Audio Playerhttps://kcaw-org.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/14BLACKCOD.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Just about all commercially utilized species in Alaska are studied intensively, and black cod are no different.There are fisheries surveys that go out and count and measure fish, and determine their age. And there are landings — tons of black cod sampled by state biologists at the dock.But in one very important way, black cod are different from, say, salmon.“Black cod abundance doesn’t seem to be related to the number of spawning adults out there.”Moss is a research fisheries biologist with NOAA’s Auke Bay Laboratories. So what makes it a good year for black cod — or, in Moss’s words “how do the stars align” to increase the chances that young black cod will grow to maturity?“All signs point to that happening during their first year of life in the ocean.”Moss is back in Sitka where he’s teamed up with the Sitka Sound Science Center to survey the ecosystem that produces black cod. It’s called the “Gulf of Alaska Assessment.”“Basically, we go out there and measure the physical properties of the ocean. Temperature. We also look at phytoplankton — the small plants that live in the ocean — as well as zooplankton, larval marine fish, juvenile marine fish that are not larvae anymore, but are free swimming, and everything else we catch. And that could range from jellyfish all the way up the line to salmon sharks and most recently, Pacific sunfish.”Moss believes that the missing piece to understanding black cod survival is somewhere in the ocean environment — especially the kind of food, and the quality, that the juvenile fish need to survive.As school children — school children in Alaska anyway — we’re taught all about the life cycle of salmon. And black cod, which are bottom dwellers, seem remote and mysterious by comparison.It turns out that black cod have a fascinating beginning.“After they hatch the larvae rise to the surface and they actually spend most of their first year in shallow waters — out in the ocean, but at shallow depths, let’s say the top 3 or 4 fathoms — and feed on plankton and other marine fish and critters. And then they move closer to shore and typically rear in near-shore habitats before moving out into deeper water.”In Sitka, one of these black cod nurseries is St. John the Baptist Bay, near Salisbury Sound.The objective of the assessment — and its companion tagging study — is better management of an important commercial species, but Moss says the “bonus” is a deeper knowledge of the changing ocean environment, and how it affects all species.And the ocean is changing. Beginning in 2014 oceanographers detected a massive area of the Pacific Ocean that remained at higher-than-normal temperatures, and is just now dissipating.Nicknamed “The Blob,” the phenomenon was created by a rare combination of ocean conditions, rather than by climate change. Nevertheless, Moss’s surveys during The Blob produced an atypical data set.Researchers measure a Pacific sunfish caught near Icy Straits. Normally found in warmer waters, sunfish — and other species — moved into the gulf during the 2014-2017 phenomenon called “The Blob.” (Photo by NOAA)“We had pomfret, which are a pelagic fish that are typically offshore. We saw those fish come inshore. They were eating a lot of the juvenile rockfish — Pacific Ocean perch in particular, in ‘14 and ‘15. We also saw Pacific sunfish — 800-pound fish that we were bringing on deck at times in our trawls. They don’t eat very high in the food chain — they mostly eat jellies and other things — but that was very interesting. And we saw more blue sharks come up into the waters.”All of which can affect the growth and survival of black cod. Moss says we need to understand what tradeoffs are happening in the ecosystem, and if they favor traditional commercial species, or other fish “that are important ecologically, but maybe not commercially.”Share this story:last_img read more

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Baker & McKenzie appoints 40pc women among 83 new partners

first_imgThursday 25 June 2015 8:57 pm Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe Wrap’Drake & Josh’ Star Drake Bell Arrested in Ohio on Attempted ChildThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapWatch President Biden Do Battle With a Cicada: ‘It Got Me’ (Video)The Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The WrapNew England Patriots’ Cam Newton says no extra motivation from Mac Jones’SportsnautPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The Wrap whatsapp Tags: NULL Baker & McKenzie appoints 40pc women among 83 new partners whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Share Express KCS GLOBAL law firm Baker & McKenzie has promoted 83 solicitors to partner, including three in London, bringing the firms’ total number of partners worldwide to 1,500. The firm made the hiring announcement yesterday, pointing out that 40 per cent of the new promotions have gone to women.“I am particularly pleased to see the increase in female partners,” Baker & McKenzie chairman Eduardo Leite said off the back of the announcement, adding: “As these new promotions demonstrate, we have a tremendously diverse pool of natural talent which we need to continue to invest in to develop our next generation of leaders.”Thirty-four per cent of the promotions were seen in EMEA, while 28 per cent came from Asia Pacific. The firm’s global tax group promoted 21 partners, while its mergers and acquisitions team added 15 new partners.In the City, Jannan Crozier was promoted to partner in the firm’s corporate group, while Patrick O’Gara became partner in the tax department and Stephen Ratcliffe was promoted to partner in the employment and employee benefits department. All three solicitors originally joined the firm as trainees. last_img read more

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Pfizer CEO predicts that controversial rebates are ‘going away’

first_img Ed Silverman Pfizer CEO predicts that controversial rebates are ‘going away’ What is it? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Pfizer chief executive officer Ian Read CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricingpharmaceuticals Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot center_img @Pharmalot What’s included? [email protected] In his first public remarks since rescinding price hikes, Pfizer chief executive officer Ian Read predicted the controversial rebates that drug makers pay to pharmacy benefit managers will soon disappear.“I believe we are going to go to a marketplace where we don’t have rebates,” Read reportedly said during a conference call on Tuesday to discuss Pfizer earnings. “Rebates are going away.” By Ed Silverman July 31, 2018 Reprints GET STARTED About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more

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At the top of her field, a Covid-19 researcher fights back against a different kind of virus: sexism and power imbalances in science

first_imgHeavyweightsAt the top of her field, a Covid-19 researcher fights back against a different kind of virus: sexism and power imbalances in science Even for one of the most high-profile virologists in the midst of the pandemic, it was not an event that will be easily forgotten.For nearly 10 hours on a recent Saturday, Akiko Iwasaki was feted at a virtual gathering celebrating her 50th birthday and the 20th anniversary of her Yale lab. Former and current colleagues showered her with gifts, reminisced about outings to bars, Six Flags, and campsites, and answered trivia questions (her favorite color is purple — Iwasaki is a huge Prince fan).But at about hour eight, the festive mood turned solemn. During toasts from her mentees, who thanked her for counseling them on how to respond to critics, Iwasaki shared how she’s still fending them off herself. She said a retired male professor, who was a former chief of surgery at a different university, had recently berated her in an email over a paper she wrote in Nature Medicine that called out toxic principal investigators in academia and charted how to dismantle hostile workplaces.advertisement Reporter, Morning Rounds Writer, Intern Coordinator Shraddha writes the Morning Rounds newsletter and covers health and medicine. Leave this field empty if you’re human: To know Iwasaki is to know that she is passionate about combatting sexism, power imbalances, and toxic behavior in academia. A prolific tweeter with nearly 80,000 followers, Iwasaki shares frustrations about mansplaining, gender discrimination, and the extra work that women, especially women of color, endure in dealing with messages that question their expertise and position. “I’m exhausted from having to do this, which takes time away from my real work,” she tweeted.advertisement Related: In several interviews with STAT, she did not hold back in her condemnation of “the power dichotomy” in science, where junior scientists — especially women — are subject to harassment and discrimination. “A professor holds such power that they kind of get away,” Iwasaki said. “Imagine having to protect yourself from this kind of behavior and having to do science.”With the Covid-19 pandemic, Iwasaki, also an immunologist, has seen her influence soar. She is a go-to expert on Covid-19, and since the start of the pandemic, her team has published nearly two dozen papers, ranging from describing a new mouse model for studying immunity to outlining what reinfections mean for Covid-19.“Back when I was in the lab and would tell people who I worked for, only people in our exact field knew her,” said Michal Tal, a former graduate student in the Iwasaki lab, who is now at Stanford University. “Now I tell people [I trained with her] and they swoon.”Since March, Iwasaki is seemingly omnipresent in news stories and on TV, radio, and podcasts segments. Even with round-the-clock scientific work, Iwasaki said these media appearances are crucial to fighting misinformation about the pandemic and educating the public about how the body’s immune system is likely to be able to fend off SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19.She has the same mission on Twitter: She’s written in-depth, sometimes wonky, threads explaining Covid-19 papers coming out of her own lab, and puts others’ research into context. Her thread explaining the significance of the first published case of Covid-19 reinfection in Hong Kong, for instance, has drawn more than 9,700 retweets and 12,500 likes. Being the first such case, there was considerable concern among experts and laypeople about what it meant for the trajectory of the pandemic. However, Iwasaki seemed unfazed. In her thread, she clearly states, “This is no cause for alarm — this is a textbook example of how immunity should work,” before she explains, in simpler terms, the findings. Please enter a valid email address. Tags Coronavirusprofilesresearch Related: Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Privacy Policy By Shraddha Chakradhar Oct. 27, 2020 Reprints ‘It’s time for systemic change’: Scientific leaders urge new efforts to curb sexual harassment in the field There have been several people over the years who have been “rescued,” as the academic parlance goes, from difficult and often toxic lab environments to become a part of Iwasaki’s lab.Two years ago, M.D./Ph.D. student Alice Lu-Culligan was in a different department at Yale and said she was exposed to bullying, harassment, and a cutthroat environment that robbed her of the joy of doing research. “It was a very difficult environment because of my colleagues and also the leadership of the PI herself,” she said.But a chance meeting with Iwasaki at a women in science event changed that. As Lu-Culligan described her situation, she felt immediately validated as Iwasaki asked follow-up questions about the lab environment, offered to intervene on Lu-Culligan’s behalf, and advised that she get out of the situation. “Even members of my thesis committee advised me to keep my head down and get through it, but here was an outside faculty member who was telling me that she would protect me,” Lu-Culligan said.And after she transferred into Iwasaki’s lab, Lu-Culligan learned that she was hardly the first such person to find a new scientific home with Iwasaki. Even the very first graduate student in the lab decades ago was such a “rescue.” “It showed that it was always part of [Iwasaki’s] purpose and identity to create a home for people like me,” Lu-Culligan said. “Whatever is right for her trainees is what she’s going to do.”In a display of her commitment to trainees and science alike, Iwasaki has also been deliberate about assembling a diverse team, one that includes scientists from several countries, across the gender spectrum, those with different levels of education, and those who haven’t followed typical career trajectories.Iwasaki’s 50th birthday and 20th lab anniversary celebration on Zoom last month. Maria TokuyamaDuring the Zoom celebration, Iwasaki gave a talk on the benefits of diversity in science, based on her “observational study” of her own lab over the past 20 years. “I’m sorry there’s no control group,” she joked. More than half of the nearly 100 people who have been members of her lab have been women, she said, and lab members over the years have hailed from more than a dozen countries.“From a selfish standpoint, if we want to do the best science we can, we need a diverse set of people,” she told STAT. “I’ve also enjoyed hearing about a diverse set of thought processes, based on where people are from and their backgrounds — that really gives you that spice you need to do creative science.”Iwasaki herself has spoken out about being a Japanese American immigrant, a background that she said she’s been especially conscious of as xenophobia and racism against Asian Americans has surged amid the pandemic. “It’s all subtle,” she said. Even before the pandemic, she and her family had dealt with incidents in their majority-white town in southern Connecticut. Her kids felt excluded and were made fun of at school, Iwasaki shared, and she and her husband moved them to a different school district. That feeling of being an outsider has only heightened. “If I go into the downtown area, there are some stares,” she said, adding, “I can’t tell if it’s because I am Asian, but I could feel it.”center_img About the Author Reprints [email protected] Women researchers are publishing less since the pandemic hit. What can their employers do to help? Her willingness to be vulnerable about sensitive topics and with those she works with makes Iwasaki stand out in a world that’s otherwise shaped by strict hierarchies and boundaries between principal investigators and the members of their lab, whether students or staff.“I hate hierarchy and grew up in a hierarchical system in Japan,” Iwasaki said, adding that she has “completely dismantled” it in her lab. “I never treat a high school student differently than a postdoc.”That kind of open lab environment allows scientists to know they are more than just their research, said Howard Liu, a psychiatrist at the University of Nebraska Medical Center who struck up a friendship with Iwasaki over Twitter given their shared interest in gender equity work in STEM. “I really believe in the importance of intentional boundary crossings with trainees,” he said. When Iwasaki shares her ongoing struggles, or goes to the movies and restaurants with her team, “it’s a chance for [trainees] to see your life and the things you value, and to see life outside a lab. And she has consistently done that,” Liu said.Many current and past lab members say that among the biggest things they’ve learned from Iwasaki is how to balance motherhood with the demands of academia. She had both her children — now 11 and 13 — after establishing her own lab. As Iwasaki was pregnant with her younger daughter, Naomi, one of her trainees was expecting her first child.From left, then-graduate student Michal Tal, a lab member’s partner, and Iwasaki show off their pregnancies at a lab barbecue in 2009. Michal Tal“We would pass each other in the hallway waddling back and forth to the bathroom all the time,” Tal said. One of the many lab outings was to a sushi restaurant, and Iwasaki and Tal strategized on ways to avoid eating sushi, even though it’s a favorite of Iwasaki’s. Having a female mentor and lab head is special, Tal said, but “nobody can get you like another pregnant woman can — it’s a whole other kind of relatable.”And because it’s so rare for women in academia to get that kind of support, Iwasaki is intentional about showing hers.The pinned tweet atop her page is a snapshot of a conversation she had with a mentee several years ago about choosing between pregnancy and a career in STEM: “Be pregnant and go on interviews,” Iwasaki told her. “If they don’t welcome you with open arms and offer childcare options, they don’t deserve you.”“She taught me that there’s not one or the other,” said Maria Tokuyama, a current postdoc in Iwasaki’s lab.Tokuyama said she got nearly 12 weeks of fully paid maternity leave, compared to the eight weeks designated by the National Institutes of Health. Ellen Foxman, who is also now a Yale professor of immunobiology, shared during the Zoom celebration that she was hired into the Iwasaki lab after taking six years away from science to become a parent.“Her openness about succeeding as a mother was one of the most important things I’ve learned,” Tokuyama said, adding that it’s a trait she plans to instill in her own trainees when she starts her lab at the University of British Columbia in March next year. With her prolific tweeting also comes a fair amount of backlash. Iwasaki said she isn’t dealing with a daily deluge of Twitter trolls, but when it happens, “it puts a damper on my efforts.” Her messages about scientific topics don’t get nearly as many critics as when she tweets about women in science or other cultural issues about academia. “But I try to highlight even that, that when people are criticizing me, as a woman of color, they need to check themselves,” she said.Iwasaki has also taken to tweeting in other languages, including Japanese and Portuguese. She doesn’t know the latter, but “I just use Google Translate,” she confessed. “I really want to reach out to the world.”In recent weeks, she has collaborated with journalists to put out easy-to-understand diagrams explaining how the immune system works and participated in events that encourage scientists to step out of their silos and integrate social and political issues into their work.Ruslan Medzhitov, Iwasaki’s husband and fellow Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at Yale, recalled that she was fixated on the pandemic before it hit U.S. shores. “I wasn’t even thinking about it that much, and she was looking for every new report from China,” said Medzhitov, an immunobiologist.While Iwasaki is now more publicly recognized as one of the “experts to trust,’’ her candor about delicate topics in academia has led her for years to establish a reputation as approachable, with her lab becoming a haven for those who are working under unsupportive mentors or who are no longer excited to be doing scientific research.In the more than three years she has been on Twitter, she’s had hundreds of people reach out to her directly on the platform. But many others have reached out to her offline over the two decades she’s run her own lab. “I’m never too busy for that,” Iwasaki said. “I feel I have to do this because there’s no one else helping them. I cannot have students suffering in silence.” “He told me that my kind of attitude … was ruining the lives of young men,” she said, adding that this person also wrote that Iwasaki’s suggestions could have ruined the careers of many Nobel Prize-winning scientists had she spoken up about their toxic environments. And without missing a beat, Iwasaki added through laughs, “Maybe I should have.” The gender harassment we experienced sank our medical careers Iwasaki said the only time she seriously thought about leaving academia was right after she gave birth to her first child, Emi. Not winning the on-campus child care lottery meant placing her daughter in day care about 30 minutes from campus. Emi had trouble bottle feeding, even though she was given different shapes and types of bottles. For a few weeks, Iwasaki made the 12-mile trip every day from campus to the day care to breastfeed.During one of these trips, Iwasaki pulled off the road and broke down, she said. “I felt so guilty that she had to be hungry without me, but also for my lab members who couldn’t get my full attention.”Iwasaki said her husband was a major support system in that difficult period, even though she often felt the pangs of unfairness as a working mother. “Of course he can’t breastfeed, but a lot of the household chores and child care issues fell on me and I felt devastated,” she said.In the 15 years since, Iwasaki said her husband has been much more involved with their daughters, and she acknowledged other support systems and privileges that have allowed her to dedicate time and energy to work and her family life.Iwasaki celebrates with her Yale lab members after being elected into National Academy of Sciences in 2018. Kellie JuradoShe was just 30 when she established her lab at Yale. She was granted tenure and an appointment at Howard Hughes Medical Institute within the next decade, both of which freed her up to take on non-lab projects, such as her science communication efforts, and to cultivate a lab environment that’s considerate of everyone. And in the last two years, she has been elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine, dual recognitions that are reserved for the most accomplished scientists.“I think what allowed me to survive is the wonderful people who came through the lab,’’ she said. “I curated people who are kind and generous and whose nature was important.”And continuing to mentor the next generation of scientists is what’s most important to her. She made that clear to everyone gathered at the Zoom party, who asked her what the next 20 years would look like for the Iwasaki lab.“I really don’t need any more accolades or papers. It’s all about you guys,” she said.Her hope is that the newer generation of scientists that comes in carries that mentality of showing kindness, standing up for others with less power, and working to make a difference.  “Academia has to change,” she told the group. “And it’s gonna change if we all did that, and hopefully the older generation will be gone [so] can clean up this mess.” Virologist and immunologist Akiko Iwasaki has pivoted her work to Covid-19 amid the pandemic. She’s also a prolific science communicator, especially on Twitter. Steven G. Smith for STAT @scchak Related: Shraddha Chakradharlast_img read more

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Fort Myers man’s “Aspie Files” podcast celebrates inclusion, acceptance

first_imgRetired teacher hopes to empower students with swim around Key West June 14, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement WATCH: Fort Myers lotto looter on the run with stacks of scratchers June 16, 2021 Advertisement Thief scoops up tip jar at Fort Myers ice cream shop June 16, 2021center_img FORT MYERS, Fla. — Alex Townsend has wanted to work in television since he was a kid. Now, he does. As a news technician for NBC2, Alex helps with a variety of tasks like running the teleprompter or monitoring audio during newscasts. But when he’s not working behind-the-scenes, he’s in front of the microphone on his own show: The Aspie Files. Aspie is a nickname for those who have Asperger’s syndrome like Alex. “I was diagnosed with Asperger’s in the eighth grade,” Alex said. “I had difficulty socializing with other kids my own age. I had difficulty fitting in with them.” AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementTo help those better understand Asperger’s, Alex launched The Aspie Files podcast in 2020. The show features his take on current events and pop culture among other things. “People who have Asperger’s or any form of disability can thrive in the world,” Alex said. “We just need a lot more acceptance, a lot more patience, and a lot more love.” The Aspie Files is available to listen to on most podcast platforms. CLICK HERE to check it out. Former NYPD officer finds unexpected joy patrolling Fort Myers elementary school June 16, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Fort MyerspodcastStory2Sharelast_img read more

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Reminder to put your clocks forward this weekend

first_imgHowever this could be one of the last times we change the clocks.According to one Ireland South MEP, the European Parliament are now one step closer to abolishing seasonal clock-changes.The European Parliament’s Transport and Tourism Committee has said that seasonal clock changes should be abolished in 2021 and it is up to the Member States to choose between winter or summer time.In an online consultation by the European Commission conducted last year, more than 80 percent of the participants expressed their support for the abolition of the seasonal clock-change.According to the committee, Member States should notify the Commission of their choice by April 2020. By Siun Lennon – 29th March 2019 Facebook Pinterest Home News Community Reminder to put your clocks forward this weekend NewsCommunity TAGSclocks go forward WhatsApp GAA Reminder to put your clocks forward this weekend RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleInsurance burdens are driving Laois businesses to the wallNext articleIn Pictures: Barrowhouse GAA mark centenary year with new jersey and memorabilia Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. GAA Pinterest Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Facebook Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results There are two very important things to remember this Sunday: Mother’s Day and spring forward the clocks!Yes it’s that time of year again – where you try and figure out which one of your internet contraptions automatically adjust the time and which don’t.The British Summer Time (BST) officially starts at 1am on Sunday 31 March. The clocks go forward an hour to 2am. GAA MEP Deirdre Clune said: “At European level Irish people took part in a public consultation and Ireland voted overwhelmingly to stop the clock changes.“There are many benefits to ending the process of changing the clocks each year such as improved outcomes for road safety and economic benefits. In addition brighter evenings in winter would have a positive benefit for public health.”Late last year Minister for Justice and Equality, Charlie Flanagan TD announced a consultation asking members of the public whether they are in favour of abandoning the current system and, if they are, whether they would prefer to stay constantly on ‘summer time’ or ‘winter time’.MEP Clune added: “Summertime arrangements in the EU require that the clocks are changed twice per year in order to cater for the changing patterns of daylight and to take advantage of the available daylight in a given period.”SEE ALSO – Women in Sport: The captain going for school’s All-Ireland glory – Erone Fitzpatrick 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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Portarlington Further Education information evening on Thursday, June 27

first_img TAGSPortarlington Further Education Twitter Facebook Pinterest Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin WhatsApp There’s a range of course options availabe in Portarlington Further Education and Training Centre – and they’re holding an information evening on Thursday, June 27, from 6.30pm to 8.30pm in the Midlands Park Hotel.Check out our free VTO programmes – T & Cs apply.Among the courses available to study are:Return to Learning – QQI Level 4Healthcare Support – QQI Level 5Early Childhood Care & Education – QQI Level 5Office Administration – QQI Level 5Business Management – QQI Level 6Certificate for Accounting TechniciansDiploma for Accounting TechniciansSocial Care – QQI Level 6For more information, contact [email protected] or 057 8623161.SEE ALSO – Renowned psychologist speaks about UCC courses available through Laois Third Level RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleGood news for Laois commuters as part of new motorway set to fully open tomorrowNext articleJoin The Heritage for an evening of bubbles, pampering and skincare treats LaoisToday Reporter Facebook Home Sponsored Portarlington Further Education information evening on Thursday, June 27 Sponsored GAA GAA Twitter Portarlington Further Education information evening on Thursday, June 27 Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA By LaoisToday Reporter – 17th June 2019 WhatsApp Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory last_img read more

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$1 million for creative arts scholarships

first_img$1 million for creative arts scholarships Students from regional and remote Australia will be supported to study the creative arts through a new scholarship program worth $1 million.The Morrison Government will provide $18,000 to 50 undergraduate creative arts students from regional and remote areas to assist with course fees, purchasing study materials, accommodation and living expenses. The new scholarships will be available in 2021.Minister for Education Dan Tehan said the scholarships would provide support for students to undertake internships, to increase their work experience and to engage with the creative arts industry while they study.“These scholarships support our Government’s plan to lift the education attainment for students in regional Australia and strengthen the relationship between students and industry to drive workforce participation and productivity,” Mr Tehan said.“The work experience element in the scholarships will help students build networks, connect with employers and transition to employment in the sector after their degree. Financial support with the costs of travel, accommodation and textbooks will help Australians from regional and rural areas to achieve their ambition of obtaining a higher education degree.”Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts Paul Fletcher said the cultural and creative arts sector supported more than 600,000 Australians and contributed $115 billion to the economy.“Our scholarships will provide more opportunities, particularly for Indigenous students, to study towards a career in Australia’s vibrant creative arts industry,” Mr Fletcher said.“The scholarship program builds on the Morrison Government’s $250 million package announced on 25 June 2020, and the $27 million support package dedicated to Indigenous visual arts centres, regional arts and the live music and performance industry announced on 9 April 2020.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, career, communications, Economy, education, employment, Government, Indigenous, industry, Minister, Morrison, Morrison Government, Music, Safety, students, travellast_img read more

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UK Government publishes plan for largest vaccination programme in British history

first_imgUK Government publishes plan for largest vaccination programme in British history At least 2 million vaccinations per week with over 2,700 vaccine sites across the UKOver 200,000 offers of non-clinical support from the public and leading UK businesses to help with the logistics of the programmeTens of millions of people will be immunised by the spring at over 2,700 vaccination sites across the UK, the government has announced today as part of comprehensive plans to rapidly scale up the COVID-19 vaccination programme.The UK COVID-19 vaccines delivery plan sets out how the government will work with the NHS, devolved administrations, local councils and the armed forces to deliver the largest vaccination programme in British history.By the end of January, everyone in England will be within 10 miles of a vaccination site or, for a small number of highly rural areas, the vaccine will be brought to them via mobile teams. There will also be capacity to deliver at least 2 million vaccinations in England per week by the end of January and all residents and staff in over 10,000 care homes across the country will be offered a vaccine by the end of the month.This will be made possible by the rapid expansion of the programme, including:206 active hospital sites50 vaccination centresaround 1,200 local vaccination sites – including primary care networks, community pharmacy sites and mobile teamsThis will mean every at-risk person has easy access to a vaccination centre, regardless of where they live.The expansion of the programme will also mean all adults will be offered a vaccine by the autumn.The government and the NHS have also mobilised a workforce of over 80,000 health professionals to help in the delivery of the programme across the different vaccination sites, with over 200,000 additional members of the public expressing their interest in helping with the non-clinical elements of the rollout such as administrative support, logistics, stewards and first aiders.All offers of support have been recorded and individuals will be contacted when they’re needed.Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:It’s taken a tremendous amount of hard work and dedication to make such an incredible start to this ambitious deployment programme. Our vaccine deployment plan sets out exactly how we will harness these efforts to expand the programme quickly and safely.Our UK COVID-19 vaccines delivery plan maps our route back to normality, but it does not mean we can be complacent and it is mission critical that everybody abides by the restrictions in the coming weeks.The next few months will present a significant opportunity to turn the tide of battle against COVID – I am looking forward to watching these plans bring more reassurance and hope back to people’s lives after a difficult year.The plan is split into 4 main areas:supply – including the development and manufacturing of vaccines, ensuring their safety and effectivenessprioritisation – insight into the first 2 phases of deploymentplaces – ensuring simple, fair and convenient access to vaccinations for the public, regardless of where they livepeople – mobilising the workforce and providing information on vaccinations to local communitiesAs set out by the Prime Minister last week, the plan also reiterates the commitment to offer the first vaccine dose to all those in the top 4 priority groups recommended by the Joint Committee of Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) by 15 February. With these groups accounting for 88% of COVID-19 fatalities, the move will prevent thousands of deaths once their immunity develops in 14 days.This would account for almost half of the priority groups in phase one, with all 9 high-risk groups for phase one of the programme being vaccinated by spring. Phase 2 will look at the best tactics for achieving protection for the whole UK population, and may include vaccination of those at high risk of catching COVID-19 or delivering key public services. The JCVI will consider all available evidence for phase 2 recommendations of the vaccination programme.Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng said:This historic vaccination programme is a truly national effort and shows the whole of the UK coming together to quickly and effectively protect the British public against this terrible virus.It’s fantastic to see so many people stepping forward to help out, and I encourage businesses, wherever possible, to allow their staff time and scope to volunteer. This is the greatest logistical challenge of our time and we must all play our part.Public Health England (PHE) is also today publishing the surveillance strategy for the COVID-19 vaccine programme which sets out how data from surveillance is used to analyse vaccine effectiveness at preventing COVID-19 and severe disease, as well as the impact of the vaccination programme on the population as a whole.Over 2 million people in the UK have now been vaccinated with the Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccines since the vaccination programme began.Through the Vaccines Taskforce, the UK has secured early access to 367 million doses of 7 of the most promising vaccines so far. To date, the government has invested over £230 million into manufacturing a successful vaccine. In the Chancellor’s Spending Review, published on 25 November, it was announced that the government has made more than £6 billion available to develop and procure successful vaccines.Minister for COVID-19 Vaccine Deployment, Nadhim Zahawi, said:The UK vaccines delivery plan is a culmination of all our hard work so far, and sets some very promising and challenging ambitions for the next few months.I have every faith the NHS will rise to the task and meet these ambitions, providing thousands of vulnerable and at risk individuals that crucial extra protection they need.Interim Chair of the government’s Vaccines Taskforce, Clive Dix, said:We have worked at unprecedented pace and scale to ensure Britain receives vaccines that meet strict safety standards as quickly as possible.The UK has led the world in procuring, authorising and deploying vaccines and I am confident that, working closely with manufacturers, we are ready and able to meet the government’s target for vaccinations. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:business, community, covid-19, Government, Immunisation, immunity, local council, primary care, Prime Minister, public health, Secretary, surveillance, UK, UK Government, vaccinationlast_img read more

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