Joe Biden planning to visit UK in first trip outside North America

first_imgSunday 17 January 2021 11:37 am “Joe’s view will be that they’ll have the destiny of the world on their shoulders so he’ll want to overcome any political differences. Labour is also considering sending leader Sir Keir Starmer or shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy to the ceremony. Joe Biden planning to visit UK in first trip outside North America Share Stefan Boscia “I think there’ll be more empathy than there was between Boris and Donald Trump. Boris seemed to get along with Trump, but I don’t know if he really did.” There had been some concerns in Downing Street before November’s election that Biden may not warm to Johnson over his role in Brexit and his relationship with Donald Trump. The source close to Biden said: “Boris is a conservative, Joe’s a moderate [Democrat] so I think they can get over it. I think they’ll end up getting along. Biden is also known to be proud of his Irish ancestry and publicly warned Johnson last year that there would be repercussions if he breached the Good Friday peace agreement in Brexit negotiations. However, a source close to Biden has told the Sunday Telegraph that the president-elect wants to forge a strong relationship with the Prime Minister and his government. whatsapp whatsappcenter_img Joe Biden is reportedly planning on visiting the UK as his first trip outside North America as US president. Biden’s inauguration will be on Wednesday, with British ambassador to Washington Dame Karen Pierce expected to attend. Biden is known to be proud of his Irish ancestry and publicly warned Johnson last year that there would be repercussions if he breached the Good Friday peace agreement in Brexit negotiations. (Getty Images) Biden is known to be proud of his Irish ancestry and publicly warned Johnson last year that there would be repercussions if he breached the Good Friday peace agreement in Brexit negotiations. (Getty Images) Also Read: Joe Biden planning to visit UK in first trip outside North America Biden is known to be proud of his Irish ancestry and publicly warned Johnson last year that there would be repercussions if he breached the Good Friday peace agreement in Brexit negotiations. (Getty Images) Also Read: Joe Biden planning to visit UK in first trip outside North America Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.com Biden will come to Cornwall in June for the G7 summit, however he is also now planning on visiting Boris Johnson before this date to set the foundations for a renewed Transatlantic special relationship. A UK government source said the UK would be second on Biden’s list of trips outside the US, after Canada. Before the Open newsletter: Start your day with the City View podcast and key market data last_img read more

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Vaccine critic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. says he will chair Trump’s vaccine safety panel

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Politics What is it? Robert F. Kennedy Jr. arrives in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. Evan Vucci/AP Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Sheila Kaplan and Dylan Scott Jan. 10, 2017 Reprints What’s included? Vaccine critic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. says he will chair Trump’s vaccine safety panel WASHINGTON — Outspoken vaccine critic Robert Kennedy Jr. said Tuesday that he had accepted a position in Donald Trump’s administration as chair of a panel on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, in what would be the clearest sign yet of the president-elect’s suspicions about vaccines.Kennedy’s remarks followed his meeting with the president-elect at Trump Tower and immediately sparked outrage from scientists, pediatricians, and public health experts, who fear the incoming administration could give legitimacy to skeptics of childhood immunizations despite a huge body of scientific research demonstrating that vaccines are safe. Many of those skeptics believe vaccines are a cause of autism. GET STARTED Tags policypublic health Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More last_img read more

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Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, May 28, 2019

first_img GAA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, May 28, 2019 Facebook Twitter By Alan Hartnett – 28th May 2019 Pinterest Below are the recent deaths in Laois.Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam.Loughlin McEvoyLucan, Dublin / Ballacolla, LaoisMcEVOY (Lucan, Co. Dublin and formerly of Ballacolla, Co. Laois) May 26th 2019 (peacefully) in the loving care of the staff at St. Francis Hospice, Blanchardstown and surrounded by his family. Loughlin, beloved husband of Brigid and dear father of Lochlann, Eileen, Padraic and Ciaran and a devoted grandfather of David, Anna, Sarah, Niamh, Mae and Lottie. Sadly missed by his loving wife, sons, daughter, grandchildren, son-in-law Alan, daughters-in-law Whitney and Cathy, brother, sisters, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.R.I.P.Reposing at his home on Monday evening from 4.00 o’c to 8.00 o’c. Removal to St. Mary’s Church, Lucan on Tuesday morning arriving for Requiem Mass at 11.00 o’c followed by burial in Donacomper Cemetery, Dublin Road, Celbridge. Family flowers only, please. Donations if desired to St. Francis Hospice, Blanchardstown.Kathleen Donovan (née Ryan)Liogard, Portlaoise, LaoisDonovan (nee Ryan) Liogard, Portlaoise, May 23rd 2019. Peacefully surrounded by her loving family. Kathleen, beloved wife of the late Jack. Dearly loved mother to Dominic, Séan and Niall. Cherished grandmother to Derek, Edel, Alica, Keith, Jack and Stefan. Great-grandmother to Lauren, Faye and Ciamh, brothers Joe and Donnacha, sisters-in-law Babs and Shile, nephews, nieces, relatives and friends.Rest in peaceReposing at Keegans Funeral Home from 6 pm on Saturday evening with rosary at 8 pm. Requiem Mass in SS Peter and Paul’s Chuch at 12.30 pm on Sunday followed by interment in SS Peter and Paul’s Cemetery, Portlaoise.Patrick (Paddy) McDonnellKillyganard, Ballylinan, LaoisPeacefully, at home, surrounded by his loving family. Predeceased by his loving wife Babs, brother Tom and sisters Anne and Sadie. Dearly loved father of Mary, Ann, Elizabeth, Catherine, Patrick, Cecelia, John, Esther, Michael and Eamon. Deeply regretted by his sister Mary (UK), sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, grandchildren, great-grandchild, brothers-in-law, sister-in-law, nieces, nephews and a wide circle of relatives and friends.Rest in PeaceReposing at his residence from 2pm tomorrow, Friday, with Rosary at 8pm. Removal by Rigney’s Funeral Director’s on Saturday at 1.30pm to arrive at St. Anne’s Church, Ballylinan for Requiem Mass at 2pm. Burial afterwards in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Ballyadams.Sister Cora McHale CSNKillenard, Portarlington, Laois/Dublin 3, DublinMcHale, Sister Cora CSN, (late of Killenard, Portarlington, Co. Laois) May 22nd 2019 (peacefully) at Nazareth House; deeply regretted by her family, Colm, Una, Kevin, Ann and Dolores, sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, extended family, and by the Nazareth Sisters in the Irish Region.Reposing in Nazareth House Chapel, Malahide Road, Dublin 3 from 4pm – 8pm Thursday 23rd May. Removal on Friday 24th May to St. John’s Church, Killenard for Requiem Mass at 1pm, followed by burial in Killenard Cemetery.Martin BerginChurch Road, Donaghmore, LaoisMartin Bergin, Church Road, Donaghmore, Portlaoise, Co. Laois, May 21st 2019. Peacefully, at Tullamore Regional Hospital, following a long illness. Deeply regretted by his loving wife Mary and his family Pat, Liam and John, daughters in law Collette and Denise, grandchildren Conor, Oisín and Ollie, his brothers Stephen and Joe, sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nephews, nieces, relatives and friends and all his vintage and dancing pals.Reposing at his residence (Eircode R32 W6X6) Church Road, Donaghmore on Wednesday and Thursday evening from 3pm with rosary at 9pm on both evenings. Funeral Mass on Friday at 10am in The Church of the Holy Trinity, Rathdowney, followed by burial in Bealady Cemetery.Family flowers only, by request, donations can be made at Martin’s funeral to the Tullamore Dialysis Unit.House Private on Friday morning.Sean (Schilachi) CorcoranCoolagh, Clonaslee, LaoisSean Corcoran, Malaga, Spain. Died suddenly in Spain. Deeply regretted by his partner Krissiie and daughters Sarah Louise and Chelsea. Mother Marie, brother Enda, sisters Rita (Healion,Tullamore) and Rose (Daly Killoughey), brothers-in-law Joe and Conor. Sister-in-law Noreen, uncles, aunts, nephews, nieces, relatives and friends.Reposing in Lawless Funeral Home, Mucklagh Village on Saturday 25th May from 4pm until rosary at 8pm. Funeral arriving to St Manman’s Church, Clonaslee on Sunday 26th for 11.30 Requiem Mass. Burial after Mass in St Manman’s Cemetery, Clonaslee.Family flowers only please. Donations, if desired, to the Kevin Bell Repatriation Trust.SEE ALSO – Deaths in Laois – Monday, May 26, 2019 WhatsApp GAA Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Previous articleElections 2019: Your full list of the 19 Laois County Councillors following three incredible days of dramaNext articleSt Abban’s AC travel to Finland for European Clubs Championships Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Twitter GAA TAGSDeaths in Laois 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Facebook WhatsApp Home Deaths Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, May 28, 2019 Deaths Pinterestlast_img read more

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Observing the “Immovable Object”: An interview with A.B. Abrams on North…

first_img Analysis & Opinion Pence Cartoon: “KOR-US Karaoke” Facebook Twitter SHARE Tracking the “unidentified yellow substance” being dried out near the Yongbyon Nuclear Center Gabriela BernalGabriela BernalGabriela Bernal is a freelance writer on Korean affairs and currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of North Korean Studies in Seoul, South Korea. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Analysis & Opinion Daily NK contributor Gabriela Bernal recently posed a number of questions to A.B. Abrams, the author of a new book about North Korea called “Immovable Object: North Korea’s 70 Years at War with American Power.”Q. Your book provides readers with interesting insights into the Korean War. From your perspective, what are the chances that another war will be fought on the Korean Peninsula within the next decade? What would such a war look like?The Korean Peninsula is technically at war today, and although both Pyongyang and Seoul have taken steps towards reconciliation, a formal end to the Korean War is unlikely to be reached so long as the third party, the United States, does not perceive this to be in its interests under the current circumstances. Despite this, the possibility of escalation to a new hot war remains slim due to the mutual vulnerability between all three actors. As confirmed multiple times by US intelligence, North Korea demonstrated the capability in 2017 to deliver nuclear strikes across the US mainland, including to New York City and Washington D. C., building on its prior missile deterrent which held Guam and bases in Japan under threat. This kind of mutual vulnerability was wholly absent during the Korean War period in the early 1950s, where cities across North Korea were bombarded continuously for almost three years primarily by American aircraft which could strike from bases in Japan and South Korea without any risk of retaliation against Japanese or South Korean cities, much less American ones, or against the airfields housing the bombers.  To quote Ronald Reagan: “History teaches that wars begin when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap.” Both sides can do such massive damage even without escalating to use of weapons of mass destruction that the chances of any party initiating a conflict remain very low. There is a strong case to be made that the chances of war were reduced considerably after 2017, as many in the American leadership such as Senator Lindsey Graham, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Joseph Dunford and President Trump’s National Security Adviser at the time H. R. McMaster, among others, had all expressed the rationale that so long as the US mainland was safe from attack, initiating a war in Korea was possible. This was despite the expected “humanitarian catastrophe,” as McMaster put it, for Japan and South Korea should America choose to attack North Korea. Mutual vulnerability which now encompasses the U.S. mainland itself means Washington is highly unlikely to risk a war. factory kim jong un businessKim Jong Un on a visit to a factory in June 2019. / Image: Rodong ShinmunThis reality is not necessarily indefinite, and as the US moves to invest more in technologies for combating peer level adversaries we could see growing confidence in its ability to intercept North Korean strategic missile attacks using new missile defense systems. Pyongyang is thus likely to also continue to modernize its strategic deterrent, which has provided it with a much more cost-effective means to improve its security situation relative to investments in conventional military forces. Modernization could include deployment of greater numbers of more sophisticated ballistic missile submarines and of intercontinental range missiles with multiple warhead re-entry vehicles. North Korea’s military modernization efforts will very likely continue to be premised on and shaped by the requirements the military thinks it needs to deter the United States from launching a war. Regarding the initiation of open hostilities, of the three actors involved Pyongyang and Seoul are much less likely to pursue such a course of action than Washington. North Korea in particular has negligible expeditionary or power projection capabilities and limited logistics for large scale operations beyond its borders. Its ground forces are thus not well suited to anything beyond territorial defense, and cannot realistically aim to capture territory in South Korea or elsewhere. South Korea’s armed forces are similarly, although to a lesser extent, oriented towards defense. This contrasts strongly to the United States military, which is oriented overwhelmingly towards long range power projection and offensive operations overseas, meaning it does have the capability to benefit from a war by capturing territory and seeking to occupy North Korea. While in the 1990s when there was a prevalent “victory disease” in the US in the aftermath of the Gulf War, and when North Korea’s armed forces and missile deterrents were a shadow of what they are today, there may have been such a possibility; however, the likelihood of America seeking to do so today remains very low. Q. In the book, you mention that the COVID pandemic has further weakened the West’s power and influence relative to East Asia. How do you see this influencing North Korea’s relationship with China as well as North Korea’s future negotiation stance vis-à-vis the US? In the short term the COVID-19 crisis has negatively affected the North Korean economy, although in the medium and long term the global power trajectories it has helped to accelerate will be strongly in Pyongyang’s favor. The decline of Western economies relative to those in East Asia, and relative to China in particular, are highly favorable for Pyongyang as those parties seeking the North Korean government’s overthrow and to force change in the country are weakened. Countries willing to work cooperatively with North Korea, including not only China but also South Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, and others have been strengthened relative to the Western world, and a weaker West in turn will be less able to place pressure on countries to shun ties with and isolate Pyongyang as it has been doing for decades. China’s emergence as the largest trading partner of South Korea, and many other third parties critical to Western efforts to isolate North Korea, was already a major development in this regard which reduced Western leverage across much of the world. As the discrepancy between the importance of trade with China and the West continues to grow in favor of the former, the latter’s ability to place pressure on countries to conduct foreign policy in line with Western interests will decline. This trend bodes well for North Korea, as while it has been shut out of the Western-centered global economy due to largely ideologically driven Western hostility, a global economy centered on China and other non-Western parties could allow Pyongyang to integrate itself as a trading nation. Military implications are also significant, with China having matched American spending on military acquisitions for the first time in 2020 and expected to exceed this considerably over the coming decade, meaning the balance of power in East Asia will be increasingly unfavorable to Western interests. This in turn will reduce pressure on North Korea from the military front, as the US and its allies will no longer have the freedom to initiate military action across the region on favorable terms. China’s surpassing of the US in a number of key fields vital to its status as a major power, from hypersonic weapons to the number of research papers published, similarly bode well for Pyongyang as part of a broader trend in this regard. A stronger China will be less prone to Western pressure to neglect ties to North Korea in the economic and military spheres, and a more overt improvement in ties could be seen in 2019 with a state visit by President Xi Jinping to Pyongyang, renewed military exchanges and the signing of agreements on economic cooperation and defense agreements. This could lead Washington to seek to more quickly make a deal with Pyongyang to focus its attentions on Beijing, or conversely to place further pressure on North Korea as a means of both maintaining influence in South Korea and pressuring Beijing through tensions with its treaty ally.  Q. You mention that the West’s main goal with North Korea goes further than denuclearization and is actually about complete regime change. If talks with North Korea continue to fail, how far do you think the West will go in order to achieve this goal? Forcing a change in the government in North Korea is notably referred much less today to in the West than it was 25 years ago – and when referred to it is increasingly considered a remote and very long-term goal rather than something that can be achieved in the near future. When the Western world was at the height of its power in the 1990s, Pyongyang was facing its deepest crisis since the Korean War due to a combination of both three years of serious natural disasters and economic isolation from the collapse of the USSR and Warsaw Pact states which had been its leading trading partners. At that stage the collapse of all communist countries including North Korea and China was widely considered an inevitability in the West, and economic sanctions and military pressure were applied on the former by the US and South Korea in particular which worsened its already serious situation. With North Korea having survived this “Second Arduous March,” as it is referred to in the country, and subsequently endured the death of its second leader Kim Jong Il without signs of instability that Western analysts had almost unanimously predicted, the US and its allies began to realize the possibility that the East Asian state was much more resilient that previously thought. While regime change today is a Western objective, it has become a remote goal where it had previously been an immediate one, with eliminating or restricting the country’s nuclear program seen as a key near-term objective. The loss of faith in the idea that the “tide of history” or “human nature” would ensure North Korea’s destruction and eventual Westernization, something widely expressed by Western officials and analysts in the 1990s and 2000s, could be clearly seen under the Barak Obama administration. As late as January 2015 President Obama expressed his continued belief that a Korean collapse was a historical certainty, but later that year shifted to a more proactive stance against Pyongyang by initiating a campaign of cyber attacks. This was followed in 2016 by moves to seriously consider initiating a war against the East Asian state. This shift notably came in parallel to a growing realization in the same decade that indefinite Western primacy in the economic and technological spheres was not a certainty, despite the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and stagnation of Japan in the 1990s, with growing perceptions of a “China threat” in the Obama and Trump years. Rodong Sinmun reported on Sept. 6, 2020, that Kim Jong Un had visited storm-ravaged areas of South Hamgyong Province. / Image: Rodong SinmunThe Western world will, if again in a position of power, use all means at its disposal aside from those which it is deterred from pursuing to bring about a collapse of the North Korean state. Radio broadcasts and the smuggling of USBs to promote pro-Western and anti-government political narratives, pressure on third parties to cut economic and diplomatic ties, and military flights very near North Korean airspace to place more pressure on its air force to intercept them, are examples of means of pressure used in the past in the respective information, economic and military fronts. As it is, however, pursuit of denuclearization is seen as a much more urgent goal which from the mid-2010s increasingly shifted attentions away from regime change, with the nuclear program having thus to a large extent shielded Pyongyang.Q. Related to the previous question, you make it clear in your book that you do not agree with regime change in North Korea. Do you believe long-term peace is possible on the Korean Peninsula if the Kim family remains in power? If so, would you say a two-state solution on the Peninsula would be preferable to unification? This is an interesting question. I would clarify that it is not that I do not agree or disagree with a change in government per se, but rather with the imposition by external actors of a change in government – which would inevitably reflect the interests of those engineering such change rather than the interests of Koreans themselves. Under the UN charter countries are not given the right to impose their own ideals or models of governance on other member states. The record of unilateral regime change efforts since the UN was established have been far from positive, ranging from the widely documented and severe war crimes committed against the North Koreans when US forces crossed the 38th parallel in 1950, to conduct at Abu Ghraib prison or towards Afghan civilians more recently, among many others. Thus the credibility of those external actors claiming that remaking North Korea in their own image by dismantling the Pyongyang government is an altruistic goal in the Korean population’s own good is very questionable. I would argue that whether Chairman Kim or his family remain in power is primarily important for domestic purposes – namely because it demonstrates continuity with the resistance struggles in the Japanese Imperial and Korean War periods to the Korean population through a single bloodline. In terms of foreign relations however, governance is done through a consensus of the Workers’ Party of Korea and the Korean People’s Army as the country’s most powerful institutions – hence why regime change referred to in the West requires a removal of all governing institutions in the country and a forceful remaking of the country’s political culture rather than simply a change in the head of state. Thus should the Kim family retire from power for any reason, I do not expect that the country’s foreign relations would change significantly. A long term peaceful solution to the Korean conflict is possible since both Pyongyang and Seoul, at least under the Moon Jae In government, appear willing to accommodate one another and neither appears intent on imposing its system or ideology on the other. Reunification remains possible, although it would likely be far from a full unification given the very significant cultural and systematic differences between the two countries. We could instead see something akin to “one country two systems,” with a closed border and potentially separate militaries and diplomatic missions, but with extensive free trade agreements and close coordination for economic planning and in some aspects of foreign policy. As was evident over the past three years, however, South Korea’s ability to move forward with reconciliation is constrained by the nature of its relations with the United States, despite an eagerness on the part of the Moon administration and seemingly by the general public to do so. This means either a change in Washington’s position, or some form of political change in South Korea itself to gain greater independence, will be a prerequisite for any major steps beyond the symbolic gestures of the past three years towards a serious change in the relationship. Q. In the book, you mention the many negative humanitarian effects sanctions have had on the North Korean population. In your view, will sanctions ever have their desired effect or is it time to move on to another strategy? Whether or not sanctions have their desired effect depends on what one perceives their purpose to be, in that while they often fail to influence the behavior of the governments of the targeted countries, they are effective in placing downward pressure on living standards and hindering economic growth and modernization. Examples of this are manifold. UN sanctions on Iraq in the 1990s killed over 500,000 children in half a decade and devastated living standards, while US and EU sanctions on Syria today are imposed specifically to impede post-war reconstruction. The negative humanitarian effects of sanctions in Korea have been far less serious, and there has been no runaway inflation or serious increases in the prices of essential goods as was seen in the Middle East or in Venezuela, primarily because of the country’s far more advanced, diverse and less import reliant economy. The primary impact has been to reduce potential for economic growth and impede plans to raise living standards. Reports from South Korean sources widely indicated a relatively high rate of GDP growth in North Korea before 2020 despite the extreme amount of economic pressure the country is under, highlighting that, if anything, estimated growth rates have been too low. If the country were free to trade and export its goods, capitalizing on advantages including a weak currency and a highly educated and skilled workforce and established technological and industrial bases, annual growth rates several times higher and likely significantly over 10% would be expected. Located between Japan, China and South Korea, North Korea’s position as a trading nation at the geographical heart of the world economy is highly enviable. Lack of access to international markets was a key hindrance to the economy even during the Cold War period, when North Korea was listed under the Trading with the Enemy Act while Japan and South Korea were given open access to world markets by the US and its Western partners. Should North Korea’s economy have been allowed to grow unimpeded it would have significant geopolitical implications for East Asia and the wider world to the detriment of Western interests. Sanctions are thus effective in placing downward pressure on both economic growth and living standards for a country which is governed under non-Westernised political and economic systems, which makes them an effective foreign policy tool. As the center of the global economy increasingly shifts away from the Western world, however, the potency of Western sanctions is likely to be reduced considerably. This trend is likely to be exacerbated by the wider applications of Western sanctions, which was seen particularly in the US under the Trump administration where countries threatened with sanctions ranged widely from Indonesia and India to Egypt and Belarus. As more countries are targeted or threatened, the number of workarounds will increase and a greater proportion of the world economy will begin to move away from reliance on trade with the West. ri pyong cholKim Jong Un at the leadership podium during the Party Foundation Day military parade in Pyongyang on Oct. 10, 2020. / Image: KCNAI expect the US and its European partners will continue to apply sanctions throughout the coming decade, and will only be willing to partially lift them in exchange for Korean concessions on its weapons programs. As elaborated further in the book, the nature of North Korea’s political and economic systems and its foreign policy mean that unilateral Western sanctions will remain in place indefinitely regardless of whether or not it maintains its nuclear or missile programs, as the West is fundamentally opposed to allowing such a country to exist in East Asia for ideological and geopolitical reasons. These unilateral sanctions are imposed under a range of pretexts including a number of alleged human rights abuses which makes them extremely difficult, often for legislative reasons, to lift. This contrasts to the multilateral sanctions imposed through the United Nations which are specifically in response to the North Korean nuclear program, and which there is greater room to see lifted. With options for military pressure increasingly limited, sanctions are one of the few means for the West to apply pressure and seek to gain concessions, although ultimately to press for more fundamental change in the country a greater focus on a third means of applying pressure, through information warfare, is expected.Q. What do you think we can expect from Kim Jong Un in 2021? The course North Korea takes in terms of foreign policy will largely depend on the behavior of the incoming Biden-Harris administration. The Obama-Biden administration notably oversaw the most hostile period in US-North Korean relations since the Cold War, and as elaborated in the book, it brought the two countries the closest they have come to a large scale hot war since the 1960s. Obama notably took a much harder line on Korea than any other post-Cold War president, from sanctions and military pressure to cyber warfare and a much greater focus on information warfare. Mirroring this, Pyongyang applied pressure of its own with by far the most missile tests under any administration occurring during the Obama years. Joe Biden has expressed support for very similar policies to those of Barak Obama, and as a candidate for the Democratic Party nominee he echoed discourse prevalent throughout the party by slamming Trump for having “rushed to legitimize a dictator” by holding dialogue. He instead advocated cutting talks until Pyongyang first made unilateral concessions towards denuclearization, and notably referred to dialogue as a “reward” for North Korea rather than a means for resolving issues. He later advocated attacks on Korean targets to prevent the country from further developing its long-range missile capability. In his first presidential debate with Donald Trump in October Biden went so far as to liken Trump’s development of more positive relations with Pyongyang to the appeasement of Nazi Germany before the Second World War.Despite strong rhetoric on campaign, it is possible that Biden as president will take a softer line than Obama did due to the very different geopolitical position the United States faces in 2021 relative to 2009. This relates not only to North Korea itself, which has demonstrated far greater resilience to economic sanctions and has carried out an unprecedented transformation in its military capabilities over the past five years, but also to America’s position in the wider world with its military, economic and technological dominance increasingly challenged. Should the Biden administration seek a deal early on, in order to focus foreign policy attentions more on China, Russia, Venezuela or other theatres, we can expect that North Korea will offer concessions such as a ban on ICBM tests, a freeze on nuclear warhead production, and limited inspections of its nuclear sites. This could provide the American administration with an early public victory which its predecessor had failed to achieve, and in return Pyongyang could see sanctions passed through the United Nations Security Council from 2017 and 2016, and possibly even from 2013, rolled back. Alternatively, should the Biden administration seek to press for a more one-sided deal through pressure, or even to force unilateral action by Pyongyang before it agrees to negotiations much like the Obama administration did, we could see a repetition of the cycle of escalation and de-escalation as was seen under Clinton, Bush and Trump administrations. The US could attempt to pressure third parties to enforce sanctions more strictly and conduct more military exercises near Korea, and Pyongyang could in turn conspicuously test more strategic missiles. Now that North Korea has the option from the outset of escalating to the level of ICBM tests, the dynamics of this escalatory cycle will be very different. The Biden administration will likely be forced to return to the negotiating table as its immediate predecessor was should it take this course. Past trends in relations can give indications as to the future trajectories the 70-year conflict will take, but the nature of the American position today is unprecedented particularly after the COVID-19 crisis and when considering the sharp decline in its power relative to China. While Pyongyang’s policies are expected to be consistent with those of previous years, the United States could well make some unexpected and more unconventional moves in the foreign policy realm in response to these changes which could affect its relations with Pyongyang. A. B. Abrams is the author of Power and Primacy: A History of Western Intervention in the Asia-Pacific. He has published widely on defence and politics under various pseudonyms, and is proficient in Chinese, Korean and other East Asian languages. He has completed Masters degrees in related subjects at the University of London. Abrams has spent much time in North Korea, studied the Korean language at university in Pyongyang, and has many contacts with Koreans inside the DPRK and overseas.Please direct any comments or questions about this article to [email protected] Analysis & Opinion Is Nuclear Peace with North Korea Possible? last_img read more

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IIROC to focus on complaint handling: report

IIROC drops expanded OBSI reporting proposal The Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada is going to be examining compliance with complaint handling rules, and the use of advisory titles in the months ahead, the self-regulatory organization said Wednesday. In its newly released report, which gives results of the latest round of compliance examinations, IIROC also says that in the current exam cycle it will be focusing on compliance with the client complaint handling rule, which came into effect in 2010. The review consists of a client complaint handling survey and the examination of client complaints handling processes at select dealers. Keywords Compliance,  ComplaintsCompanies Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Retail trading surge on regulators’ radar, Vingoe says When does poor service become a regulatory issue for online brokerages? Related news James Langton IIROC says that the initiative is designed to ensure that firms have implemented the rule in the context of their business models; examine the procedures and processes introduced to achieve the rule’s desired outcomes; look at whether the rule has enhanced consumer protection; and, understand any challenges or operational difficulties encountered by firms. It expects the initiative will provide examples of ‘best practices’, which IIROC will be able to share with other dealers in a guidance notice. The regulator also reports that it has also undertaken a targeted survey regarding the use of titles, designations and other descriptors by reps and other employees. IIROC says that the use of certain titles and designations such as “financial planner”, “retirement specialist” or “senior advisor” are intended to convey an impression of proficiency and invite client trust. “It is, therefore, important that there be appropriate rigor, consistency and controls around the use of titles,” it says. The survey aims to improve the regulator’s understanding of: internal firm policies relating to the use of titles; the internal approval process for the use of such titles; the range of titles being used; and, it will also look at investor complaints relating to the use of titles and designations, among other things. Also in the report IIROC spells out some of the common deficiencies uncovered in its latest round of compliance exams, including: the use of inaccurate margin rates; order-execution services that provide clients with ‘planning tools’ that may deliver what amounts to a recommendation, which would require a suitability review; instances where firms have not adequately identified conflicts of interest; and, that it also continues to see a lack of adequate controls around the sale of private placements to accredited investors, and instances where dealers have not adequately supervised the activity within employee accounts. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

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Jamaican Entrepreneurs in South Florida to be Honoured

first_imgRelatedJamaican Entrepreneurs in South Florida to be Honoured Jamaican Entrepreneurs in South Florida to be Honoured UncategorizedMarch 21, 2006 RelatedJamaican Entrepreneurs in South Florida to be Honoured FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Fifteen Jamaican entrepreneurs, community leaders and public officials in South Florida will be honoured at the first annual Recognition and Installation luncheon of the JA-USA Chamber of Commerce, to be held on Friday, March 24 at the Sheraton Hotel in Davie.The recipients will be recognized for their positive contribution to the Jamaican Diaspora and the USA marketplace, according to President of the Chamber, Marie Gill, who is also President of M. Gill & Associates, a Miami-Dade consulting firm.In keeping with the theme of the event: ‘Unleashing our Entrepreneurial Spirit’, the programme will highlight current developments in Jamaica with directions on a variety of investment opportunities.Special guest speaker will be Aubyn Hill, President of the National Investment Bank of Jamaica (NIBJ).The JA-USA Chamber of Commerce was started in March 2003 and is the brainchild of Jamaica’s Consul General to the Southeast USA, Ricardo Allicock.Since its inception, Miss Gill noted that the Chamber members have been deliberate in their efforts to promote trade within the Jamaican Diaspora, and to dramatically improve international trade activities.Miss Gill reiterated that the JA-USA Chamber, as part of its mission, has embarked on a drive to not only improve trade between Jamaica and the USA, but to encourage investment in Jamaica as well. The Chamber is also focused on helping immigrants within the Diaspora to assimilate in the United States, she added.Members have also participated in several trade shows, locally and in Jamaica.Through their Scholarship Fund, the Chamber has awarded two scholarships – one to a doctoral student pursuing business management studies in London, the other to a student of the Swift Purcell Boys’ Home, Highgate, St. Mary, completing studies in agricultural science at Brown’s Town Community College in St. Ann.The Chamber was also instrumental in assisting with renovation to the Swift Purcell Boys’ Home after damage to the property during Hurricane Ivan in 2004.Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Chamber’s Small Business Disaster and Student Scholarship Funds.center_img RelatedJamaican Entrepreneurs in South Florida to be Honoured Advertisementslast_img read more

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CPA Secretary-General Pays Three-Day Visit to Jamaica

first_imgCPA Secretary-General Pays Three-Day Visit to Jamaica UncategorizedJune 21, 2007 RelatedCPA Secretary-General Pays Three-Day Visit to Jamaica RelatedCPA Secretary-General Pays Three-Day Visit to Jamaica FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Newly appointed Secretary-General of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA), Dr. William Shija, will arrive in the island tomorrow (June 22) for a three-day visit.Dr. Shija will arrive at the Norman Manley International Airport at 12:25 p.m. and is expected to call on a number of local officials later in the day, including Prime Minister, Portia Simpson-Miller; National Security Minister and Leader of Government Business in the House of Representatives, Dr. Peter Phillips; President of the Senate, Syringa Marshall Burnett and Karl Samuda, representing the Leader of the Opposition, Bruce Golding.The CPA Secretary-General will be the special guest at a reception hosted by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Micheal Peart, where he will have the opportunity to meet with parliamentarians, members of the diplomatic corps and other government officials.On Saturday (June 23), he will travel to Ocho Rios and Montego Bay, stopping at various sites along the way, and will visit with Parliamentarians on the island’s western end. Dr. Shija will depart Jamaica late Sunday (June 24) for the Cayman Islands.center_img Advertisements RelatedCPA Secretary-General Pays Three-Day Visit to Jamaicalast_img read more

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UNDP in partnership with Turkish Government launches a new report for effective COVID-19 response

first_imgUNDP in partnership with Turkish Government launches a new report for effective COVID-19 response Istanbul, Jan 12 – The UN Development Programme’s (UNDP) Istanbul International Center for Private Sector in Development (IICPSD) and Turkey’s International Health Services Inc. (USHAŞ) launched a new report – ‘Lessons Learned and Strategies for Local Manufacturing of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for COVID-19 Response Based on Literature Review, Experience and Case Study from Turkey: USHAŞ’, at a virtual ceremony today.The new report is the outcome of the Memorandum of Understanding signed between UNDP and Turkey USHAŞ back in June 2020. The objective of this partnership has been to work together to strengthen local capacity and build opportunities and transfer knowledge between Turkey and partner countries for developing high-quality PPE production and distribution within the framework of South-South Cooperation.Haoliang Xu, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Director of UNDP’s Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, New York stated, “Despite phenomenal news of vaccines and the roll out, it is as important to manage high demand for quality Protective Equipment produced under sustainable business practices. UNDP’s engagement with private sector on COVID-19 response focuses on collaboration, sustaining and supporting private sector resilience and viability; and, building capacity for resilient, inclusive, low carbon recovery.”H.E. Prof. Dr. Emine Alp Meşe, Deputy Minister of Health of the Republic of Turkey stated, “Substandard and uncertified PPEs if they find their way into the countries risk the security and health of especially frontline health care workers and citizens, undermine the public health measures in practice and revert the progress against pandemic.”The new report showcases good practices from Turkey including the measures taken to mitigate the challenges of coordinating the production line and bottlenecks in the PPE value chain, including the distribution in domestic and international markets. The report includes information on PPE raw materials, necessary equipment and skills and the cost of production, making it a one stop shop for manufacturers.Additionally, the report draws upon key sources including but not limited to World Health Organization’s most recent publications on COVID-19 and PPE standard requirements, International Finance Corporation’s tool for determining cost of production and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s PPE value chain analysis, World Trade Organization’s overview on the import-export restrictions, Asian Development Bank’s PPE market analysis among others. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Asia, building, business, covid-19, Government, health services, Minister, New York, production, public health, resilience, Secretary-General, sustainable, Turkey, U.S., UNDP, World Health Organizationlast_img read more

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Shackling of aged inmate, Mumia Abu-Jamal, is deplorable – UN experts: USA

first_imgShackling of aged inmate, Mumia Abu-Jamal, is deplorable – UN experts: USA OHCHRUN human rights experts* expressed serious concerns about the treatment and welfare of Mumia Abu-Jamal, an African-American man who has been in jail for 40 years in Pennsylvania, and is reportedly shackled to his hospital bed. Mr. Abu-Jamal had already been shackled to his bed during a four-day hospitalization in late February while being treated for heart failure.Mr. Abu-Jamal has been denied visits from his family and access to his lawyers and spiritual advisor after being admitted to an undisclosed hospital around 10 April, where he will reportedly undergo surgery. “This ongoing and continuing cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment, including deliberate disregard of his dignity and inhumane conditions of confinement, is a clear violation of Mr. Abu-Jamal’s most fundamental rights,” the experts added. Neither his family nor lawyers have been informed of his medical condition and treatment.“The use of shackles during his hospital stays is deplorable, and causes Mr. Abu-Jamal additional and unnecessary suffering,” said the experts. “International standards on the treatment of prisoners clearly stipulate that instruments of restraint are to be imposed only when no lesser form of control would be effective to address the risks posed by unrestricted movement.”As well as a chronic heart condition, Mr. Abu-Jamal, now 67, suffers cirrhosis of the liver caused by Hepatitis C, hypertension and a severe skin condition. In late February, he was also diagnosed with COVID-19.“We are concerned that the medical condition of Mr. Abu-Jamal could be linked to years of medical neglect by the Department of Corrections of the state of Pennsylvania,” the experts said. “This situation may also be the result of racial discrimination against people of African descent by prison and state authorities.“We call on the authorities to take all urgent measures to protect the physical integrity, life and dignity of Mr. Abu-Jamal, in line with international human rights obligations.“Communication and access for Mr. Abu-Jamal’s family and advisors should immediately be restored with Mr. Abu-Jamal and with all relevant personnel involved in his health and conditions of confinement. The state must also immediately cease withholding information and access relevant to monitoring the status of Mr. Abu-Jamal’s human rights.“We also call on the authorities to urgently address allegations of discrimination, including racial discrimination, in the medical treatment of prisoners in Pennsylvania, and to take all necessary measures to protect the physical integrity and life of all detainees, in particular older prisoners and prisoners with disabilities who seem to have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19,” the experts added.Mr. Abu-Jamal, a former activist and journalist, was charged with the murder of a police officer in 1981. He denies the charges.The experts have written to the Government to express their concerns. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:African, cirrhosis, communication, corrections, covid-19, Government, heart failure, hepatitis, hospital, Human Rights, hypertension, OHCHR, pennsylvania, prisoners, surgery, treatment, UNlast_img read more

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