Pro-Trump supporters to march in Central London today

Saturday 14 July 2018 10:19 am Pro-Trump supporters to march in Central London today James Booth whatsapp whatsapp According to Reuters, Trump’s ambassador for international religious freedom Sam Brownback, recently lobbied the British government on Robinson’s behalf.At a previous London march in support of Robinson, far right protesters made Nazi salutes and fought battles with the police leaving five officers injured.Read more: Tommy Robinson’s US fan club is exporting the alt-right to BritainRobinson has previously been convicted of offences including violence, mortgage fraud and travelling to the US on someone else’s passport. Today, supporters of the US President will stage their own march, starting at the new US Embassy in Nine Elms and finishing in Whitehall.Read more: Lift-off for Trump baby blimp as Sadiq Khan defends decision to let it flyThe pro-Trump marchers plan to join up with a separate rally of supporters of jailed English Defence League (EDL) leader Tommy Robinson in Whitehall.There is also expected to be a counter-march led by the group Unite Against Facism.Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, was given a 13 month prison sentence in May for contempt of court after filming himself and others outside the trial of a child grooming gang in Leeds while making comments that could have prejudiced the case. Share Supporters of US President Donald Trump are to march in Central London today following yesterday’s vast anti-Trump rally.Trump’s first UK visit since becoming President has been marked by a series of protests, including yesterday’s well attended march in Central London. More From Our Partners Supermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.com read more

Read more

Mind the ethnicity pay gap: Data is the key to a transparent and diverse society

first_img Mind the ethnicity pay gap: Data is the key to a transparent and diverse society Any changes or decisions made by a business need to be strategic, on the basis of robust evidence. Now that this evidence exists, those leaders are publicly accountable for the way they respond to it.For example, KPMG has been working to address our gender and ethnicity pay gaps for many years, taking steps such as banning all-male shortlists. But specific data allows for a more nuanced conversation – it has helped us identify key areas that need greater levels of action.And once we know the roles and entry points which require particular attention, we can brief recruiters of the need for more diverse shortlists in those areas.As our pay gap data shows for both gender and ethnicity, we’re still learning. Progress won’t happen overnight. But with a greater focus and more transparency, we are on the right path.I truly believe that transparency will enable businesses to focus on ensuring more opportunities for all based on an individual’s skills and capabilities alone. We all have bias, but reliable data is the first step to confronting, challenging, and ultimately eliminating it.Read more: Shutting down gender debates will only fuel sexist backlash whatsapp It has been a fight to change this conversation, but over the past few years there has been a noticeable shift – and I believe that legislation and the mandatory reporting of the gender pay gap has played a role in this.Once considered a whispered “women’s issue”, the publication of pay data across organisations in Britain brought the question into the public spotlight, and more importantly raised it high on the agenda for businesses of all sectors.For the first time, we have data and benchmarks across industries and the public sector – and it is in the public domain.Now, we have the opportunity to make the same progress with the ethnicity pay gap. That’s why the government consultation launched last week on the publication of ethnicity pay data is critical. It will bring the issue to the forefront for business leaders, and help build on the changes already taking place in more progressive institutions.As we have seen, raising awareness of gender pay gaps has not been the only benefit of the new reporting requirement. It has also given leaders more data and direction. To be human is to have bias – both conscious and unconscious. Tags: Trading Archive Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndoBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndozenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndomoneycougar.comDiana’s Butler Reveals Why Harry Really Married Meghanmoneycougar.comUndoZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndocenter_img Share Tuesday 16 October 2018 10:55 am If all our decisions were based on logic alone, carefully calculated and perfectly balanced, we would be robots.The benefits of being human are the passion, empathy, and creativity we can inject into our decision-making and working lives. But there are downsides.Read more: PM launches consultation into mandatory ethnicity pay reportingOur society – and therefore our workplaces – are not meritocratic. Equality of opportunity is a noble goal, but we’re not there yet. Where you were born, who your parents were, your ethnicity, and your gender can all impact on the opportunities on offer to you, and therefore your career.This issue has for too long been ignored – pushed to the sidelines of conversations in favour of other priorities incorrectly deemed more pressing. A difficult topic, it has been one that many sidestep, often because of the fear of saying the wrong thing. whatsapp More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com Melanie Richards last_img read more

Read more

Danone hit by Morocco consumer boycott and China baby formula decline

first_img whatsapp Wednesday 17 October 2018 11:06 am The French company said like-for-like sales grew by 1.4 per cent in the third quarter of the year and that it would target double-digit earnings per share growth. Read more: Inflation slows as food and drink prices dropThe depreciation of the Argentine peso, Turkish lira and Brazilian real drove down consolidated sales in the third quarter, the company said, and mass online-led protest in Morocco to boycott major suppliers of milk, bottled water and saw Danone’s sales in the country decline by 35 per cent. It was also hit by a 1.5 per cent decline in specialised nutrition products and a 20 per cent drop in baby formula sales in China after 12 months of “exceptional growth”. The hot summer boosted water sales in Europe, the company said, and dairy and plant based product sales picked up. Share whatsapp Jessica Clark Food company Danone reported it is on track to meet full-year expectations despite a consumer boycott in Morocco and a slump in baby food sales in China. Danone hit by Morocco consumer boycott and China baby formula decline Danone chief executive officer Emmanuel Faber said: “In the latest quarter, we have seen an encouraging return to growth in essential dairy and plant-based, alongside strong momentum in waters.”This demonstrates how Danone is balancing growth across its businesses.”Our performance in EDP and Waters compensated for challenging conditions in China where Early Life Nutrition shows changes in market dynamics following a period of exceptional growth.”We also have the foundations in place to navigate current emerging market volatility and currency headwinds, which will enable us to continue to deliver sustainable profitable growth. As a result, we have today reaffirmed our guidance for the full-year.”Read more: Tesco scraps best before dates on fruit and veg lines Tags: Trading Archivelast_img read more

Read more

HHS to probe whether Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ followed federal privacy law

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags Artificial Intelligencegovernment agenciesHealth IThospitals Casey Ross A federal regulator is investigating whether the federal privacy law known as HIPAA was followed when Google collected millions of patient records through a partnership with nonprofit hospital chain Ascension.The probe, first reported by the Wall Street Journal Tuesday night, was opened by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights. “OCR would like to learn more information about this mass collection of individuals’ medical records with respect to the implications for patient privacy under HIPAA,” Roger Severino, the office’s director, said in a statement to STAT. @caseymross Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Health Tech David Ramos/Getty Images By Rebecca Robbins and Casey Ross Nov. 13, 2019 Reprints What’s included?center_img National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. GET STARTED About the Authors Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] What is it? Log In | Learn More HHS to probe whether Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ followed federal privacy law last_img read more

Read more

Appeal launched to recover digger stolen in Laois

first_img Previous articleYour full guide to the acts playing in this year’s Folly Festival in CullohillNext articleIn Pictures: Huge excitement at Rathdowney Cul Camp as Joe McDonagh Cup and Laois players make appearance Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. WhatsApp Twitter GAA Facebook WhatsApp By Alan Hartnett – 2nd July 2019 Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory GAA Pinterest Twitter Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GAA Home News Appeal launched to recover digger stolen in Laois News Gardai have launched an appeal to recover a digger which was stolen in Portlaoise.The mini-digger was stolen between Saturday 3pm and Monday morning at 7am.It was being used on the site of the new Glanbia Cheese Factory in Togher in PortlaoiseIt belongs to Hinch Plant Hire, a company based in Mountmellick, and is valued at around €15,000.The digger is an Airman AX 35U-4. It is from 2007 and has a serial number: 1M8D011421.Anybody with information should contact Portlaoise Garda Station or your nearest Garda Station.SEE ALSO – Laois mum set to shave her head to raise funds in memory of beloved son 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Appeal launched to recover digger stolen in Laois Facebook TAGSdigger Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results last_img read more

Read more

Global regulators meet in Seoul

first_imgJames Langton Companies Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Global securities regulators met this week to discuss the ongoing reform agenda and their plans for bolstering investor confidence. The International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) reports that its board met in Seoul, South Korea, during the week, which included a roundtable discussion on the impact of technological innovation on financial markets. It reports that the board discussed how the pace of innovation is changing the way financial markets operate, and how securities regulators should address the new challenges and opportunities that emerge. Facebook LinkedIn Twittercenter_img “The roundtable discussion was a good example of IOSCO’s resolve to anticipate significant change and understand the different types of emerging risks that could weaken global markets and undermine investor trust,” said IOSCO chairman, Greg Medcraft. “We need to work with all stakeholders to harvest the opportunities that new technologies can deliver, while mitigating the potential risks.” At the same time, it also discussed a list of policy, organizational and strategic issues, including the designation of systemically important securities firms; reforms to over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives markets; new mandates on secondary bond market liquidity and order routing incentives; and, cyber resilience. IOSCO reports that its board also discussed current risks in capital markets; provided direction on a proposal to identify the risks stemming from market based financing; and, examined a proposal to develop tools for identifying data gaps and eliminating barriers to data gathering. It also discussed its plan for monitoring implementation of IOSCO’s principles. “Our work plan underscores IOSCO’s commitment to building trust and confidence in the markets members regulate. Without this trust and confidence, the markets we regulate won’t do their job of supporting economic growth,” said Medcraft. The organization also invited the Bank of Russia and the Financial Services Commission of Jamaica to sign onto its multilateral memorandum of understanding (MMoU) on cooperation and the exchange of information, which is used by regulators to fight cross-border fraud and misconduct. Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

Read more

Fight bite this festive season

first_imgFight bite this festive season The Department of Health is warning residents and holiday-makers across Western Australia to protect themselves against mosquito bites this summer.WA Health’s Acting Managing Scientist, Craig Brockway, said the number of Ross River virus (RRV) disease cases notified to the Department had increased in recent weeks and were significantly up on this time last year.The warning particularly applies to the south-west of WA – especially coastal areas south of Perth to Busselton – where RRV is being detected in mosquitoes collected as part of the Department of Health’s mosquito and virus surveillance program.But Mr Brockway said RRV had also been active in some parts of the mid-west.“Recent wet season rainfall in the Kimberley and parts of the Pilbara means that the risk of mosquito-borne diseases will also increase in those areas in coming weeks,” he said.“With the festive season and school holidays upon us, it is expected that people will be travelling to these higher risk regions.“It is important for both residents and holidaymakers to take additional precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes over the coming weeks.”The Department is working with local government authorities to manage mosquitoes in areas with a recognised risk of RRV activity.“However, it is not realistic to rely on mosquito management programs alone to control all mosquitoes,” Mr Brockway said.“People living in or travelling to the regions need to take their own precautions to avoid mosquito bites.”Symptoms of RRV infection – painful and swollen joints, sore muscles, skin rashes, fever, fatigue and headaches – can last from weeks to months. A blood test is required to diagnose the infection.There is currently no vaccine or specific treatment for RRV disease – the only way to prevent infection is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.Despite the Health Department warning, there is no need to alter any travel plans but people are encouraged to take the following precautions to prevent mosquito bites:avoid outdoor exposure particularly around dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active;wear long, loose-fitting and light-coloured clothing when outdoors;apply a personal repellent containing diethyltoluamide (DEET) or picaridin evenly to any exposed skin (always follow the label instructions);ensure infants and children are adequately protected against mosquito bites, preferably with suitable clothing, bed nets or other forms of insect screening;ensure insect screens are installed and remain in good condition;use mosquito nets or mosquito-proof tents when camping or sleeping outdoors.To reduce potential mosquito breeding around the home, residents should:dispose of all containers which hold water where mosquitoes like to breed;stock ornamental ponds with fish;keep swimming pools well chlorinated, filtered and free of dead leaves;fit mosquito proof covers to vent pipes on septic and rain water tank systems. Seal all gaps around the lid and ensure leach drains are completely covered;empty pot plant drip trays once a week;empty, clean and replenish your pet’s water bowl every day. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Busselton, camping, children, Department of Health, disease, exposure, Government, infection, mosquito, Perth, surveillance, vaccine, WA, WA Health, Western Australialast_img read more

Read more

The 10 cars that left their mark on electric vehicle history

first_img See More Videos PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Electric mobility is the hottest topic in the automotive industry right now. It’s new to many motorists, but the idea of a battery-powered car has been around for as long as the car itself. We’d all be experiencing a serious case of déjà vu if we’d been following the development of the automotive industry since its inception.At the turn of the 20th century, electric cars were commonly used as private vehicles and taxi cabs in major cities around the world. They were generally easier to start and operate than comparable gasoline- or steam-powered models, a trait which earned them a reputation as “women’s cars.” Ease of use wasn’t enough to keep them relevant, however.The technology was still in its infancy at the time, so early EVs were notoriously impractical. It wasn’t uncommon for pre-war battery-powered cars to register a top speed in the vicinity of 30 km/h while only providing about 50 kilometers of range. To make matters worse, users complained they spent more time charging than driving. These primitive EVs quickly lost ground to gasoline-powered models during the 1910s and the 1920s, especially affordable ones like Ford’s Model T, and development largely stopped until the 1960s. Trending in Canada While BMW was busy converting its 1602 to battery power, rival Mercedes-Benz was undertaking a similar project with a different starting point. The brand saw a market for an electric delivery van that could roam crowded city centers without emitting an ounce of CO2.The LE 306’s 22-kWh battery pack provided up to 100 kilometers of range at up to 80 kmh. It was mounted on rails so it could easily be swapped out, which was good because charging it took a jaw-dropping amount of time. “At the charging station, the discharged battery is pulled out from the side, while a new one is simultaneously slid in from the other side. It all takes no longer than a normal fuel stop,” Mercedes explained in a period document promoting the van.Like the 1602, the LE 3  06 was shown to the public for the first time during the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich. It never reached mass production, but Mercedes manufactured 58 examples for a pilot program established to gather data on zero-emissions powertrains.Jeep DJ-5E (1978)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21978 Jeep DJ-5E The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) looks like it’s based on a Volkswagen Beetle chassis, but there’s no flat-four out back. It’s a purpose-designed car powered by in-wheel electric motors not unlike the ones Porsche used in 1900. NASA presumably decided electricity, not gasoline or diesel, would power the LRV due to concerns over releasing CO2 in the Moon’s atmosphere.The LRV helped astronauts on Apollo missions 15 to 17 explore the Moon and collect valuable samples. Three of the four LRVs built are still parked on the surface of the Moon, unless crafty aliens took them home to start a one-make racing series. The program was canceled before the fourth LRV made its maiden trip to space.BMW 1602 Electric (1972)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21972 BMW 1602 Electric Bosch helped BMW turn the 1602 into an electric car in time for the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. The four-cylinder engine was replaced by a drum-shaped electric motor linked to the rear axle via a standard driveshaft. Interestingly, electricity was stored in a dozen 12-volt batteries mounted on a pallet in the engine bay. They took ages to recharge, but the entire unit could be swapped out in minutes using a fork lift.The weight added by the 350-kilo battery pack had a devastating effect on performance. The electric 1602 took eight seconds to reach 50 km/h from a dead stop, and it reached a top speed of just 100 km/h. Worse yet, it had a range of just 30 kilometers in dense city traffic.BMW built two electric 1602 prototypes that it showcased during the Olympics.Mercedes-Benz LE 306 (1972)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21972 Mercedes-Benz LE 306 National Union Electric Company teamed up with Henney Motor Company to relaunch the electric car in the late 1950s. The two partners quickly realized designing a car from the ground up was far too costly, so they decided to use the Renault Dauphine as a donor vehicle. It was cheap, it wasn’t as tiny as the Fiat 600, and it was readily available in North America.Early versions of the Kilowatt used a 36-volt electric system that provided about 65 kilometers of range and a top speed of roughly 65 km/h. Far from impressive, these stats limited the car’s use to the city. 1960 brought an upgraded 72-volt system that boosted both range and top speed to 97 kilometers. It was too little, too late, and Henney failed to find audience for the car.Historians disagree on how many Dauphines were transformed into Kilowatts, though most sources point to merely 47 cars. A vast majority of them were sold to utility companies, which likely explains why less than 10 remain today. Toronto-based Feel Good Cars Inc. recently tried resurrecting the idea of an electric Dauphine using modern drivetrain components.Chevrolet Electrovair (1964)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21964 Chevrolet Electrovair  In 1898, Austrian coachbuilder Ludwig Lohner observed the air “was being mercilessly ruined by the petrol engines that now occur in such large numbers.” He decided to build an electric car, and he enlisted a young engineer named Ferdinand Porsche to help design it.Porsche took a different approach to developing an electric drivetrain. Instead of using a single motor that spun the rear wheels, he designed round electric motors that could be mounted inside the front wheels. The motors didn’t take up space in the body, and Porsche used that to his advantage a little later when he built what’s widely considered the world’s first gasoline-electric hybrid.The Lohner-Porsche suffered from lackluster performance; it could drive for about 50 kilometers when traveling at a steady 35 km/h. The hybrid variant offered more speed and more range, but it never sold well because it was considerably more expensive than normal gasoline-powered models.Henney Kilowatt (1959)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2The Henney Kilowatt was produced in the late 1950s using Renault Dauphines, supplied minus the drivetrain by the French automaker. Fewer than 50 were converted because the sale price couldnít be kept below the target of $3,600. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. The original Nissan Leaf was an honest, well thought-out attempt at bringing electric mobility to the masses. It stood out on the American market because most of the other battery-powered vehicles launched at the same time were compliance cars half-heartedly designed to satisfy California’s draconian regulations. In 2006, a little-known startup named Tesla Motors introduced a Lotus Elise-based convertible during a private event held in Santa Monica, California. Named simply Roadster, the model promised exhilarating acceleration, zero tailpipe emissions, and usable range. It was an ambitious project, especially coming from a three-year old company no one had ever heard of before.Buyers were willing to take a gamble on Tesla. The first batch of 100 cars sold out in less than a month in spite of a six-figure price tag. Production was delayed several times, but that didn’t stop most Roadster owners from becoming life-long Tesla addicts. As they say, the rest is history. The Model S, the Model X, and the Model 3 all build on the foundations laid by the original Roadster.Nissan Leaf (2010)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22010 Nissan Leaf Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” The EV1’s Saturn-esque design hid one of the most innovative powertrains designed in the 1990s. Its electric motor generated 137 horsepower and 110 pound-feet of instant torque by sourcing juice from a 16.5-kWh battery pack. The original EV1 offered about 97 kilometers of range, though later cars benefitted from an upgraded Panasonic battery pack which boosted range to 161 kilometers.There was no way to buy the EV1. It was offered only through a lease program in a handful of big Americn cities including Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Tucson. GM was upfront about its intentions; motorists were participating in a “real-world engineering evaluation,” not buying a new car they could commute in for years on end.The company’s decision to stop the EV1 project spurred more conspiracy theories than John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Officially, executives explained there was no way to sell an electric car like the EV1 profitably because it was too expensive to build. It’s an issue many of the world’s largest automakers (including Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles) continue to struggle with today.Critics speculate GM canned the project because it was afraid demonstrating the feasibility of electric vehicles would lead to tight emissions regulations. Some even go as far as claiming oil companies paid GM to cancel the project over concerns about losing profits. Regardless, the fact is, a majority of the 1,100 examples built in Lansing, Michigan, were crushed.Tesla Roadster (2006)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22006 Tesla Roadster Trending Videos advertisement ‹ Previous Next › Supercharged by government incentives, the electric car is making a comeback as a zippy, practical, connected, and clean form of transportation. From an early Porsche design to the newest Nissan Leaf, here are some of the cars that have left their mark on the history of the EV.Lohner-Porsche (1900)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21900 Lohner-Porsche However, the Leaf was developed as an electric model from the get-go. It didn’t start life with an internal combustion engine, and it was never offered with one throughout its production run. It doesn’t qualify for the coveted “long-range” label, but it ticked every box of basic transportation, including practicality and relative affordability. Nissan upgraded the Leaf’s powertrain several times, and it’s preparing for the imminent market launch of the brand-new second-generation model. In 1964, General Motors stuffed an experimental electric powertrain in the unassuming body of a four-door Corvair. The car moved under its own power, but test drivers complained of shortcomings that made it unviable for mass-production. Notably, engineers had to weld the rear doors shut to increase structural rigidity.GM’s research and development department followed up with a second prototype named Electrovair II in 1966. The ‘Vair’s flat-six was replaced by an AC induction motor which drew electricity from a 532-volt silver-zinc battery pack. The car weighed 1,542 kilos (about 800 kilos more than the standard Corvair) yet it matched its gasoline-powered sibling’s zero-to-100-km/h time of approximately 16 seconds.Chevrolet’s records note range was the Electrovair II’s biggest downside. It could only drive for 130 kilometers on a single charge, and engineers noticed the battery pack wore out after roughly 100 charging cycles. That didn’t matter; the Electrovair II was a rolling display of technology, and it was never seriously considered for mass production.Lunar Roving Vehicle (1971)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Apollo 15 Onboard Photo: LRV with Astronaut on Lunar Surface Concerned with oil embargoes and rising fuel prices, the United States Postal Service (USPS) quietly experimented with electric vehicles during the 1970s. It notably tested a fleet of about 30 British-built Harbilt trucks in Cupertino, California.USPS ordered 350 electric Jeep delivery trucks from American Motors Corporation (AMC) in 1974, according to its archives department. The model was based on the DJ-5, which was widely used as a mail delivery vehicle in the United States at the time, and nicknamed Electruck. Period reports indicate it had a top speed of 33 mph, and a 29-mile range when the 300-plus stops it made daily were factored in. It was so underpowered that drivers were advised to avoid hills when possible, and cold climates made things noticeably worse.Cost was the final nail in the DJ-5E’s coffin. The USPS calculated the trucks were 50-percent more expensive than a comparable gasoline-powered DJ-5. The USPS put an end to the project in 1983, and Jeep stopped developing the technology to focus on more profitable projects.General Motors EV1 (1996)Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.21996 General Motors EV1 Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Clockwise, the 1964 Chevrolet Electrovair, the1900 Lohner-Porsche, the 2006 Tesla Roadster and the 1972 BMW 1602 Electric RELATED TAGSElectric CarsElectric VehiclesNew Vehicles2014 Winter OlympicsAmerican Motors CorporationAutomotive EnginesAutomotive TechnologyBMW AGCaliforniaCars and Car DesignChrysler Group LLCConvertiblesCulture and LifestyleCupertinoElectric VehiclesFeel Good Cars Inc.Ferdinand PorscheFiat 600Ford Motor CompanyFreight TransportationGeneral Motors CorporationGM EV1Henney Motor CompanyIndustrials SectorIndustriesJohn F. KennedyLansingLohner PorscheLos AngelesLotus EliseLudwig LohnerMercedes-Benz International Inc.MichiganMunichNASANational Union Electric CompanyNissan LEAFNissan Motor Co. Ltd.North AmericaOlympic GamesPanasonic CorporationPhoenix Mars LanderPostal ServicesRenault SASanta MonicaScience and TechnologySportsTechnologyTesla Motors Inc.Tesla RoadsterTorontoTransportation and Logistics SectorTucsonU.S. Postal ServiceUnited StatesVolkswagen Beetlelast_img read more

Read more

Preparation is key to stretching holiday shopping dollar, CU professor says

first_img Published: Nov. 19, 2012 Categories:AcademicsBusiness & EntrepreneurshipCampus CommunityNews Headlines Consumers should take the time to prepare themselves by researching prices and quality before they hit the stores or Internet this holiday shopping season, according to University of Colorado Boulder Professor Donald Lichtenstein.Being prepared can save consumers money, steer them away from overspending and even change their way of thinking about purchasing gifts during the holidays, said Lichtenstein, chair of the marketing department at CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.Many retailers rely on sales in November and December to make up to 40 percent of their revenue for the year, so they are geared up to welcome consumers and get them to spend as much money as possible, he said. Retailers are prepared, so consumers need to be vigilant when they shop.”Vigilance on quality, vigilance on price and vigilance on what merchants are doing is key,” Lichtenstein said. “A second thing I go back to during the holiday season is don’t get caught up in emotional shopping.”A common mistake many consumers make is that they rely on price or brand names as an indicator of quality, and many people go out and buy a higher priced item because they believe they are getting a higher quality item, he said.Shoppers need to do their homework, because many times they are just as likely to get a high quality item by paying a low price as a high price, Lichtenstein said. In some cases, the quality even diminishes as the price goes up.”So the notion of people going into the marketplace without independent quality information, that’s a big mistake,” he said. “Do your research based on quality, independent of price. Don’t rely on brand name and don’t rely on price exclusively.”Once you’ve researched quality, then do your price search, he said. There are many ways to do this, but a good place to start is online.”There is no substitute for going online and spending a little bit of time, after you’ve decided what it is you’re looking for,” Lichtenstein said. “However, there’s a lot of research that shows consumers under-engage in price search. Don’t be that lazy consumer, or it will hurt you.”This year, some retailers have brought back layaway plans. While they may work well for some consumers, once again, Lichtenstein says to be wary of them.”One of the things about layaway programs is that they cut down on price search,” Lichtenstein said. “Once I go into a store and put the product on layaway, even if they can undo the layaway, consumers get locked in and usually just check the item off their list and may miss out on a better deal elsewhere.”Lichtenstein also says to think long and hard about the whole gift-giving process before leaping in.”The truth of the matter is I think a lot of consumers would be much happier if the gift-giving aspect of the holidays was greatly reduced,” he said.That being said, most people enjoy giving during the holiday season. Lichtenstein encourages these people to be aware that there are a multitude of advertising efforts at work geared toward getting them to spend more, which can lead people to spend more than they can afford.”The advertisers say ‘This Christmas show her you love her with an X, or show him you love him with an X,” Lichtenstein said. “And that X probably costs a lot of money. I think you can show her you love her with a lot less than what the retailers are asking you to spend.”Other shopping tips for consumers:–Shoppers should be wary of stores that offer price match guarantees because market research has shown that retailers offering these guarantees often charge higher prices.–Higher prices don’t necessarily mean better quality. Lichtenstein recommends doing research on quality, independent of price.–If shopping with coupons avoid buying a product just to “get a deal.” Lichtenstein recommends using them on products the consumer usually purchases.–Shoppers should be cautious of reference price advertising — such as “was $79.95 now $49.95.” In many cases the starting prices are inflated or fictitious.To listen to Lichtenstein’s shopping tips visit http://www.colorado.edu/news/multimedia/preparation-key-stretching-shopping-dollar-0.center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Read more

Best practices DVD for early childhood launched

first_imgRelatedBest practices DVD for early childhood launched RelatedBest practices DVD for early childhood launched RelatedBest practices DVD for early childhood launched Advertisementscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Early Childhood Commission (ECC) in collaboration with the Canadian-based George Brown College on Monday (January 17) launched the ‘Best Practices DVD’ which is aimed at improving the learning, behaviour, developmental and coping skills for the 0-6 year old age group in Jamaica. Executive Director of the ECC, Winsome Johns-Gayle, said that the DVD brings to life the content of the Best Practices Document for the sector, which was launched in 2009. She said that it will be used as a resource tool by all early childhood practitioners to enforce their training. “This DVD will also serve to enhance and support the development and training for early childhood practitioners in the inclusion of children with special needs,” Mrs. Johns-Gayle said at the launch held at the Knutsford Court Hotel. She urged all stakeholders to assist in the promotion and use of the DVD and Best Practices book, and commended the team from George Brown College and all their partners “for a job well done.” Meanwhile, ECC Chairman Professor Maureen Samms-Vaughn stated that emphasis was placed on capacity development during the creation of the DVD to ensure that there is sustainability. “A number of students went from here to Canada and a number of students from Canada came here. There was capacity development at all levels,” she said. She noted further that it was “heart warming to hear George Brown College talk about what they learnt here and we were learning from them and this is how a good partnership always works.”  In her remarks, Director, Community Services and Early Childhood Education, George Brown College, Patricia Chorney- Rubin, noted that the participants in the project “have all learned so much and it has been an extraordinary learning experience and we will continue to grow and learn together.” In 2003, George Brown College was awarded a five-year project, through funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), which focused on improving the learning, behaviour coping, development, and care skills for the 0-6 year old group in Jamaica. Out of the project came the Best Practices Document. Some of the partners in this project included the ECC, Shortwood Teachers’ College and the Ministry of Education.     In 2008, the college received funding for an additional three years to focus on developing training and a video to support the Best Practices document; to support the development of training for levels two and level three in the area of inclusion of children with special needs and to consult with colleagues on the development of optimum outdoor play spaces for children birth to five. CONTACT: LATONYA LINTON Best practices DVD for early childhood launched EducationJanuary 19, 2011last_img read more

Read more