Not So Fast

first_imgLOUISVILLE, Ky. – Rory McIlroy is no Tiger Woods. Hey, I know you were wondering, so I just figured I’d throw it out there before you asked. In the wake of McIlroy’s fourth career major championship title, it’s a relevant contemplation. At 25, he becomes the third-youngest in the modern era to reach this mark – behind only Jack Nicklaus and, you guessed it, that guy named Woods. This has already been hailed as the Rory Era, a notion that won’t dissipate with his latest triumph. He is undeniably the current face of the game. The proverbial torch has been passed. All of which should have 19th holes around the world buzzing with debates over whether Rory is the “Next Tiger,” a duplicate production of the game’s last dominant figure. Well, he isn’t. He might be better. Or he might not. Only time will reveal that answer. But here’s what we know definitively: He’s not Tiger. He’s completely different. PGA Championship: Articles, videos and photos Those three words, of course, can be taken in a lot of different contexts. They can relate to the technical part of their games, as Woods has always strived to change for the better, while McIlroy can’t comprehend such reconstruction. (“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” he said with a laugh.) They can pertain to their disparate personalities, Tiger playing the role of steely-eyed assassin on the course and tight-lipped rhetorician off it, while Rory’s candor inside the ropes translates to a similar temperament elsewhere. In this context, it refers to their long-term goals. It’s all about how they approached the game from paradoxical angles, but still wound up in similar positions at similar ages. From the time Woods was a young child with posters of Nicklaus adorning his bedroom walls, he knew he wanted to someday become the all-time leading major championship winner. He was 10 when the Golden Bear won his 18th at Augusta National, but across the country in Cypress, Calif., he was keenly aware. Tiger has never wavered from that goal, either. To this day, he’s never allowed for public introspection and admitted anything to the effect of, “Hey, if I only wind up second all-time, that’s cool, too.” That’s not Rory. No, Rory grew up wanting to be the world’s best golfer, but without the tangible pursuit of hallowed records. Just a week ago, he was asked about chasing the game’s most sacred mark. “It’s not something I ever thought about or dreamed of,” he explained. “I’d like to win my fourth and that’s it, and just try and keep going like that, just one after the other. And if it adds up to whatever number it adds up to in my career, then that’s great. I don’t want to put that pressure on myself. I don’t want to put that burden of a number to try and attain.” You might choose not to believe him. You might think he’s simply trying to avoid more attention, trying to keep the pressure from being hoisted upon his already encumbered shoulders. Or you might think that last week was last week and this week is this week. You might think that two majors in a row and four by the age of 25 will have McIlroy suddenly pondering the finish line and placing that specific number in his head to someday achieve. You’d be wrong. “I’ve got to take it one small step at a time,” he said Sunday night. “I think the two next realistic goals are the career grand slam and trying to become the most successful European player ever. Nick Faldo has six [majors]; Seve [Ballesteros] has five. Obviously the career Grand Slam coming up at Augusta in eight months time or whatever it is, they are the next goals. And hopefully, when I achieve those, I can start to think about other things.” No variation of those words were ever uttered from Woods’ mouth. Nor were these, another McIlroy missive of modesty following his Valhalla victory. “At 25 years of age, I didn’t think I would be in this position.” Let’s compare that with Woods’ thoughts following his fourth major championship, an eight-stroke conquest at St. Andrews when he was 24. “I thought I’d be at this point faster than it took,” he boasted at the time. They are different golfers, but more significantly they are different people with different mindsets. There are some very logical reasons for Rory to be compared with Tiger after this win – and in some ways, they’re alike. Both great talents at a young age; both capable of dominating their competitors; both able to put their games into another gear down the stretch at a major. The colossal disparity comes in their mindsets. It comes from their long-term goals as junior golfers and how those goals never wavered. Like the dominant force that preceded him, McIlroy has been able to take the golf world by storm at an extraordinarily young age. But he is no Tiger Woods. He’s completely different.last_img read more

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DJ: More major heartbreak

first_imgUNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. – As Jordan Spieth sat ready to hoist the U.S. Open trophy on the 18th green at Chambers Bay, and Louis Oosthuizen eagerly received his second-place medal, fellow runner-up Dustin Johnson was conspicuously absent. Which is a shame, since he might have gotten some extra hardware for losing the tournament twice on the same afternoon. Already one of the most decorated players on the PGA Tour, Johnson took an opportunity to erase years of heartbreak and instead turned it into one of the biggest 72nd-hole gut punches in major championship history. Hey, Doug Sanders? Scott Hoch? It’s DJ on Line 1. Time to increase the membership list of golf’s most inconsolable fraternity. Johnson knows all about losing majors in agonizing fashion, but this one was supposed to be different. Here he stood, on the 72nd hole with the tournament hanging on his clubface, poised and confident and ready to grab his first major trophy with both hands. The pain of years past, the near-misses that kept him from earning a spot among the game’s upper echelon, were all about to be washed away. After two mighty lashes on the home hole, the target was within range. Just like at Whistling Straits, except this time there was nary a bunker to get in his way. But minutes later, the scene still reverted back to 2010, as a stunned Johnson took off his cap, brushed aside his hair and wondered what in the world had just happened. Another opportunity missed. Another chance wasted. Full-field scores: 115th U.S. Open For much of the day, the stage appeared to be his. After relying on his drives all week, equal parts mammoth and accurate, Johnson coolly broke from a quartet of co-leaders, making the turn in 33 and building a two-shot lead. Spieth had stalled, Jason Day was struggling and the path was clear for him to stride forward and accept the hardware that had eluded him. Instead, his putter betrayed him – slowly at first, and then all at once when it mattered the most. Johnson lost the U.S. Open for the first time on a four-hole stretch of Chambers Bay’s inward half, missing four straight putts from less than 7 feet. Three of those miscues led to bogeys, and an hour after holding the top spot Johnson was suddenly trailing by two. “I didn’t make any putts today, I really didn’t,” Johnson said. “I had all the chances in the world.” It was the putter, after all, that kept Johnson from turning this thing into a rout. For four rounds, he murdered the ball off the tee and flip-wedged his way around a challenging track, only to fail to capitalize on chance after chance. That trend reared its head at the end of his second round, when he squandered a lead with three bogeys across his final five holes, and it popped up again down the stretch. “If I rolled the putter halfway decent today,” Johnson surmised, “I win this thing by a few shots, it’s not even close.” Johnson faltered as Spieth took command, and at that point the script appeared to be written in ink – here lies DJ, once again the victim of a slow bleed in the final round of the U.S. Open, just like his Pebble Beach implosion from five years ago. But then Spieth made an uncharacteristic error, Johnson hit a great shot at the right time on the 71st hole, and the slate was somehow once again wiped clean. After reaching the par-5 18th green with a 353-yard drive and an easy 5-iron, he was back on the doorstep of redemption. Thirteen feet were all that remained – 4 yards of fescue and poa and dirt to cleanse him from past sins. “On the last green, just talking to my brother (caddie Austin Johnson), this is exactly why I’m here,” Johnson said. “This is why I play the game of golf. I’ve got a chance to win the U.S. Open on the last hole.” As the gallery waited for its cue, Johnson’s eagle effort slid by the hole. Not ideal, but not a problem – only 4 feet stood between him and a Monday playoff with Spieth. But seconds later, the crowd’s anticipated eruption turned into a hair-raising gasp. In the span of two quick misses and a tap-in par, it was all gone. “Whatever that putt did on the last hole, I don’t know,” he said of his birdie attempt. “I might have pulled it a little bit, but still to me it looked like it bounced left. It’s tough. It’s difficult.” “I very much feel for Dustin,” Spieth said. “He deserves to be holding the trophy as much as I do, I think, this week. It just came down to him being the last one to finish, and I was able to have one hole to rebound from my mistakes, and he wasn’t able to get that hole afterwards.” Johnson turns 31 on Monday, a prime age for golfers. He has shown signs of change this year, of maturing from the player whose checkered past continues to haunt him. Now a father and again a winner on Tour after a six-month leave of absence, everything appeared in order this week for his signature win. Instead, he was left to offer another series of half-hearted platitudes. “Starting the week, all you want is to have a chance to win on the back nine on Sunday,” he said. “I did that. I put myself in position, I hit the shots I needed to hit. I just didn’t get it in the hole quick enough.” As his seat at the trophy ceremony sat empty, Johnson was whisked away from the makeshift locker room at Chambers Bay, off to catch a flight with fiancée Paulina Gretzky and their son, Tatum, by his side. “I did everything I could,” he said. “I gave myself looks, just wasn’t my time.” With the creation of this latest layer of scar tissue, somehow more cruel and shocking than all of the others, it seems reasonable to wonder if his time will ever come.last_img read more

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Pettersen grabs headlines, lead on Day 2 of British

first_imgTURNBERRY, Scotland – If the first day of the Women’s British Open was all about Donald Trump, the second day belonged to Suzann Pettersen. The Norwegian took a two-stroke lead into the weekend after being one of just two players to break 70 in a soggy second round at Turnberry that left many in the 144-woman field scurrying for shelter and bemoaning the un-summerlike conditions. Out at 6.41 a.m. Friday in the second group, Pettersen shot a 3-under 69 for a score that only looked better and better as a grueling day on the wind-beaten Ailsa links wore on. Maria McBride of Sweden was the only player to beat Pettersen’s score with a bogey-free 66 but was still way off the pace after an opening-round 79. ”I was in 100 percent control of the ball, the flight, the spin, everything you need to do in conditions like this,” said the sixth-ranked Pettersen, who called it one of the best rounds of her career. ”It felt like I was pulling off every shot I was standing over.” Pettersen’s 7-under 137 put her two shots clear of a quartet tied for second that included Lydia Ko, who shot a 73 in some of the worst conditions in the afternoon, when the winds swirled and gusted up to 25 mph. ”I was eating my sandwich – my bread was getting wet in the rain,” said the 18-year-old Ko, who wore four layers of clothes, hand warmers and ear muffs at times during her round. And Pettersen’s 69? ”Pretty amazing,” Ko said. Teresa Lu (71) of Taiwan and South Korean pair So Yeon Ryu (72) and Jin-Young Ko (70) were also on 5 under with Ko, who is trying to become the youngest winner of a major. Top-ranked Inbee Park, seeking to complete the career sweep of the majors, shot a 73 to sit five strokes behind Pettersen. Michelle Wie withdrew after aggravating a left ankle injury when she slipped to the ground as she walked off the 13th tee. Defending champion Mo Martin shot an 80 and missed the cut, which was 5 over, as did Morgan Pressel, Paula Creamer and U.S. Solheim Cup captain Juli Inkster. Ricoh Women’s British Open: Articles, photos and videos Golf reclaimed center stage after the Donald Trump Show on Thursday. The American presidential contender, who owns Turnberry, had made the opening round of the year’s fourth major a mere sideshow by landing in his private helicopter during play and grabbing the attention of the media by continuing his election campaigning in the plush hotel overlooking the course. The Republican was less conspicuous on Friday, although his cell phone went off as he watched Martin tee off at No. 1. Instead, it was Pettersen who hogged the spotlight. On a day when more than a quarter of the field shot 80 or higher, Pettersen tamed a course she described as a ”beast.” She hit an 8-iron to three inches on No. 2 for the first of four birdies in her round, and emerged from holes 12-18 – playing into the wind – 1 under par. Pettersen is oozing confidence right now. A switch of coach at the start of the year, from David Leadbetter to Butch Harmon, has led to a minor change in her swing and major change in her mentality. ”I always thought playing through the Olympics (in 2016) would be a good goal for me,” Pettersen said. ”But now, feeling and seeing what I can do differently and how easy I can do stuff, it definitely has changed my perspective of my own career. ”I have a lot of goals left out there that I want to achieve.” First-round leader Hyo-Joo Kim dropped seven shots in her last eight holes for a 78, to slip to 1 under. McBride’s score in a round that finished in the gloom was scarcely believable, given what had happened to the rest of the field. ”It’s one of the worst rounds I’ve played, conditions-wise,” said the Swedish player. ”It’s probably the best round ever in my golfing career.”last_img read more

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Cerebral DeChambeau keeps it simple as pro life nears

first_imgABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates – As is normally the case with Bryson DeChambeau, Tuesday’s abbreviated practice round was a learning experience. He watched Jordan Spieth, studying every nuance as the world No. 1 prepared for this week’s Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship and he meticulously analyzed this week’s golf course.   “It’s all I need, one round,” said DeChambeau, who will set out this week as an amateur. While some will interpret that response as boastful, it’s more the byproduct of DeChambeau’s uncanny attention to detail and an exceedingly big brain. His major at Southern Methodist was physics and he plays a set of Edel Golf irons that are all the same length, based on the idea of a single swing and data gathered after reading “The Golf Machine” by Homer Kelley. In short, DeChambeau is smarter than most, but there are certain things the 22-year-old soon-to-be professional likes to keep simple. This week’s event, for example, is the start of what promises to be a whirlwind for DeChambeau, who left SMU last fall after winning the NCAA individual title and U.S. Amateur. DeChambeau will play all three of the European Tour’s desert swing events this month followed by starts at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and Masters before turning pro at the RBC Heritage. All total, DeChambeau will play seven events on sponsor exemptions, the maximum number allowed for a non-member on the PGA Tour, in the hopes of earning enough money, or FedEx Cup points, to become a full member. Abu Dhabi HSBC: Articles, photos and videos That, however, is not something DeChambeau has spent much time thinking about. “It’s a full schedule, but with expectations you are always limiting yourself so when I put expectations on the board it always limits me,” he said. “My expectations are none. I try to go and learn something, like playing with Jordan today, it’s a learning process. I’m an intern.” “Jordan,” of course, would be the current world No. 1, who DeChambeau played a nine-hole practice round with on Tuesday at Abu Dhabi Golf Club. DeChambeau’s friendship with last year’s PGA Tour Player of the Year began a few years ago when he roomed with Spieth’s caddie, Michael Greller, in Columbus, Ohio. He also made a point of lingering around the 18th green last year at Chambers Bay to congratulate Spieth after he’d won the U.S. Open. But on Tuesday the cerebral DeChambeau just wanted to study how the two-time major champion prepares for an event. “You learn little fine things he does different from others. Out there he’s extremely comfortable, but it’s how he acts,” DeChambeau said. “You see how he’s attentive with his chipping and gets comfortable with the grass. I can see that, it’s pretty interesting.” In an interesting twist, Spieth did some learning of his own on Tuesday as well, taking a few moments on the 12th green to study DeChambeau’s putter from Edel Golf before declaring it, “the best-looking putter I’ve seen in a long time.” “It’s really unique to have someone of his stature come over and say something like that. It’s really special,” DeChambeau said. “It adds a little bit of confidence.” But then lagging confidence has not really been an issue for DeChambeau since he tore through the amateur ranks with his NCAA and U.S. Amateur victories, but seeing it firsthand alongside the world’s top players has hammered the point home. For DeChambeau it’s been exchanges like the one he had on Monday night as he relaxed on a nearby beach with Rickie Fowler that have been so enlightening. “I asked him what made the difference for him and he said it was the belief,” said DeChambeau, who left SMU early after the NCAA levied sanctions against the school last year. “It was kind of the same boat I was in at NCAAs and it changed my whole perception of golf.” DeChambeau’s professional “internship” actually began last week as he made the rounds in Southern California to various equipment companies in preparation of his debut in the play-for-pay set. In quintessential DeChambeau style, he said on Tuesday that no decision has been made regarding who he might sign an endorsement deal with, but whichever company wins the Bryson lottery it will certainly be a well-researched choice. “It went really well, and we’re looking at all options and will make sure we make the best possible decision based on performance first and any financial interest after that,” he said. As for the next few weeks, DeChambeau is taking an exceedingly more simplistic approach. “If I hit every single shot the way I want to, everything else will come,” he said. “If a win comes, it comes. If it comes five years down the road, it comes five years down the road. I don’t think it will take that long, but the more I learn the better I will be.” What else would one expect from a physics major?last_img read more

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Four-man RSM playoff heads for Monday finish

first_imgST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – The largest PGA Tour playoff of the year at the RSM Classic didn’t finish before darkness Sunday, and it won’t include Billy Horschel when it resumes. Horschel, the highest-ranked player in the five-man playoff at Sea Island, burned the edge of the cup with his birdie putt at No. 18 on the first playoff hole. Stepping over a routine tap-in from 2 feet, he blocked it to the right and was eliminated. ”I took my time and just blocked it,” Horschel said. Mackenzie Hughes, the Canadian trying to become the first rookie to go wire-to-wire in 20 years, had a 10-foot birdie putt on No. 18 on the second extra hole and it turned away to the left. It already was plenty dark, and there was no chance to play another hole. Hughes, Blayne Barber, Camilo Villegas and Henrik Norlander were to return at 8 a.m. on Monday to finish the final PGA Tour event of the year. So much is at stake for all of them, starting with a trip to the Masters. Norlander and Villegas don’t have full status on the PGA Tour this year – Norlander received a sponsor’s exemption – and a victory would take care of that. Hughes began his rookie season just six weeks ago and has a honeymoon planned in the offseason. Barber is going for his first PGA Tour victory. All of them had their chances, and none had any real regrets over the final hour. RSM Classic: Articles, photos and videos Hughes narrowly missed birdie chances on the 15th and 16th holes, but holed a 5-foot par putt on the 18th in regulation for a 1-under 69 to join the playoff. Norlander, who closed with a 65, stuffed a 9-iron into 3 feet on the 18th in regulation and was the first to reach 17-under 265. Barber ran off back-to-back birdies on the back nine, and he had a 12-foot birdie attempt at the 18th that he missed on the low side. He shot a 66. Villegas played the best coming down the stretch. Two shots behind with three to play, the Colombian hit an aggressive drive on the par-4 16th that set up wedge for a short birdie, then holed an 18-foot birdie putt from the fringe on the par-3 17th to tie for the lead. He finished with a 6-foot par on the 18th for a 68. It was the largest playoff on the PGA Tour since Alex Cejka won a five-man playoff in Puerto Rico in 2015. No one else was close to joining the playoff. Jim Furyk had a 67 and was part of a large group at 14-under 268. That included C.T. Pan of Taiwan, who faced a longer day than even the players who had to return Monday. Pan left after the tournament to catch a flight from Savannah to New York, then New York to Hong Kong, and then a connection to Melbourne where he was to arrive Tuesday night in Australia for the World Cup.last_img read more

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Five nonwinners share Sanderson Farms lead

first_imgJACKSON, Miss. – Andrew Landry is back on the PGA Tour and off to a good start while trying to make the most of his second opportunity. Landry and J.J. Spaun are among five players who shot a 6-under 66 to share the lead after the opening round of the Sanderson Farms Championship. The 30-year-old Landry got off to a blazing start at the Country Club of Jackson, shooting 6-under through the first five holes after starting on No. 10. The highlight was on No. 14 when he made eagle from 110 yards on a gap wedge shot that bounced once and into the hole. Landry finished in seventh place at the Safeway Open earlier this month. He followed that up with Thursday’s opening flourish that even he found a hard to believe. ”Oh, man, it’s been a while,” Landry said. ”I mean, I do it every now and then when I’m at my home course, but to do it in the tournament, it’s been a long time.” Sanderson Farms Championship: Articles, photos and videos Full-field scores from the Sanderson Farms Championship Spaun made seven birdies and one bogey. He’s in his second year on the tour after having three top 10 finishes last season. The other co-leaders are Conrad Shindler, Ryan Armour and Wyndham Clark. None of the five leaders have ever won on the PGA Tour. Landry earned his way onto the PGA Tour in 2016 and finished 15th at the U.S. Open, but fell back to the Web.com Tour after an up-and-down season. He fought his way back by finishing fourth on the Web.com Tour last season and has kept the momentum. ”I’ve been out here and I know what to expect now,” Landry said. ”Other guys, first-year guys, they don’t really know what to expect.” Smylie Kaufman and 2015 Sanderson Farms winner Peter Malnati are part of a group of four players who are one back after shooting a 67. Kaufman might be the biggest name among the players at the top of the leaderboard. He had a big year in 2016 – winning the Shriners Hospital for Children Open – but struggled last season, finishing 141st in the FedExCup rankings. He said the difficult weeks helped him grow. ”I definitely learned a lot about the way I could fight, the way I could grind out rounds,” Kaufman said. ”Even though I didn’t have my best stuff, at times I was in contention going into the weekend last year.” The tournament’s defending champion Cody Gribble struggled with a 3-over 75. Dru Love shot a 1-under 71 to beat his father Davis Love III by one stroke. It’s the first time in six events that the younger Love has posted a lower score than his dad.last_img read more

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Tour schedule: Big changes will lead to tough choices

first_imgThis began as a typical brainstorming session, an opportunity to take a hard look from 30,000 feet at a sprawling business. “It wasn’t a schedule conversation, it was a product conversation,” PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan recently explained. “The question was, are we producing the best possible product for our fans? One of the things that we realized is, 11 years in, the FedExCup Playoffs continue to grow. We felt like ending Week 1, Week 2 of the NFL [season], that was a big issue and we needed to solve it.” That conversation began in early 2016 and the answers to those tough questions were officially given on Tuesday when the Tour unveiled the dramatically overhauled 2018-19 schedule. From thousands of iterations, competing interests, and moving parts was born a lineup that now features five consecutive months of marquee events starting with The Players in March, the Masters in April (come on, you knew the spring member-member wasn’t going anywhere), PGA Championship in May, U.S. Open in June and Open Championship in July. This major Murderers’ Row will give golf clear ownership of a portion of the sports calendar. The new schedule will also feature an earlier finish to the season, with the Tour Championship scheduled to be played Aug. 21-25, two weeks before the start of the NFL season, which has always cast a wide shadow over what was supposed to be the Tour’s big finish. Although it took more than two years to get here, there’s no denying the need and success of what is essentially a condensed schedule. The new dance card will certainly make the Tour better and it will also make golf better, but like most extreme makeovers there has been and will continue to be a cost. After a dozen years of hearing how much better The Players is in May, transitioning back to March will be awkward at best; and the PGA Championship’s relocation to May could take some of the event’s more storied Northeastern venues out of the rotation. But if The Players and PGA moves are the highlights of the new schedule, the devil really is in the details. Gone from the 2019 schedule will be The National, Tiger Woods’ event in Washington, D.C., which began with so much promise in 2007, and the Dell Technologies Championship, which had been the second playoff stop. Although TPC Boston, site of the Dell Technologies event, will host the first playoff event, The Northern Trust, every other year starting in 2020, it’s still a hit for one of the Tour’s largest markets. Though many observers liked the idea of a condensed schedule, in practice it’s going to take some getting used to. Essentially, the Tour had to shed four weeks off the season to move out of football’s shadow. Losing the Boston playoff event and the post-season “bye” week was half the bill. The Houston Open was relocated to the fall portion of the schedule, and the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational was replaced by an existing event in Memphis. If that all sounds clean and easy, consider that the run up to the post-season will now feature a major (The Open), a World Golf Championship (Memphis) and the Wyndham Championship. Including the three playoff stops, that’s five must-play events in a six-week window. There’s also a question of how the 2020 Olympics, which will be played in Tokyo from July 24 to Aug. 9, will fit into what currently is an already hectic portion of the schedule. Similarly, the spring line up heading into the Masters will now feature two World Golf Championships and The Players. The game’s stars will likely continue to play either the Honda Classic or Arnold Palmer Invitational, which means five starts in eight weeks. How this congestion impacts events like Bay Hill or the AT&T Byron Nelson, which will now be played the week before the PGA Championship, remains to be seen, but there will be tough choices made. Consider the RBC Canadian Open, which has been mired in a post-Open Championship vortex, will now be played the week before the U.S. Open. Depending on where the American championship is played, the move could give the field in Canada a boost, but it’s hard to imagine how it’s going to lead to long-term improvements. Give Monahan and his team credit, from a thousand different variations and moving parts has come a schedule most of the circuit’s constituents, and eventually the fans, can embrace. “Let’s look at the overall schedule and the flow and a thousand different versions on how to make it work, along with looking at the overall landscape of sporting events,” said Monahan when he was recently asked to explain the schedule process. “You think about what other leagues might do and you look at their schedule, you’re trying to balance what you know now with what you think others might think about.” Throughout this complicated process, the commissioner and Co. never lost focus on the ultimate goal, ending before football season began, and although it wasn’t painless it did turn out to be change with a purpose.last_img read more

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The ‘Oh s—‘ factor: Meet Matthew Wolff

first_imgSTILLWATER, Okla. – The kid with the funky swing was leading a Ventura County junior event – again – and the local head pro finally decided to intervene. It wasn’t enough that Matthew Wolff’s strikes were as pure as gold, his range sessions appointment viewing. But he was whipping all of the Tour wannabes with their perfect, factory-built swings, and that didn’t compute, so the pro cautioned Wolff that this form, with that action, was temporary. “He said that he wanted to give lessons to me, because he said that he could ‘fix me,’” Wolff recalls. “He said my swing wouldn’t last.” Then he sighed, clearly still miffed. “That’s been a common theme.” His doubters have gone awfully quiet now.   The Oklahoma State sophomore has exploded into one of the most fascinating and exciting prospects in golf, responding to every so-called swing guru with the ultimate rebuttal: Low scores.  Awards.  Trophies.  To thrive in this era of Internet trolling, Wolff has needed a refreshing, new-school coach and skin thicker than Kevlar, but there’s a hint of satisfaction in his voice as he recounts some of his past skeptics.  “To be able to prove them all wrong,” he says, “motivates me just a little bit more.” Not since Rickie Fowler has a 19-year-old possessed such appealing attributes: the eye-catching swing and monster game, the unmistakable swagger and dynamic personality.  Wolff has become the face of college golf.  And maybe soon the pro game, too. “He brings so much to the table,” says his swing coach, George Gankas, “and you can tell in his charisma, the way he hits the ball, the way he carries himself. If he plays like I know he can play, like, oh s—, he’s going to be such a huge disruptor.”  Your browser does not support iframes. AT THE TOP OF HIS BACKSWING, Wolff is up on his left toe, and his club is across the line, like a slugger sitting on a 95-mph fastball. Indeed, it’s a move borrowed from his brief baseball career, when he was a standout shortstop who played on a 12-and-under travel team that wound up competing for a national title in Cooperstown, N.Y. (Wolff even pitched the final innings.) But the team-first ethos on the diamond never quite jibed with Wolff’s makeup. “He’s very sensitive,” says his mother, Shari. “When he’d mess up, he felt really bad letting the team down. He’d rather be in charge and be the dictator of his own performance.” That pushed Wolff even further toward golf, where the same athleticism that made him a stud leadoff hitter, shooting guard and quarterback allowed him to create ridiculous clubhead speed and power. Self-taught, he experienced near-immediate success at the junior level, so he didn’t bother tinkering.  “If I never saw what my swing looked like,” he says, “I’d think that I swung it straight back and straight through.” Shari’s job as an office manager and bookkeeper didn’t provide Wolff the opportunity to join the ritzy private clubs in the area, so he played when and where he could, bouncing around the public tracks near the family’s home in Agoura Hills, California, about 45 minutes northwest of Los Angeles. “He always had trouble having a place to go,” Shari says. “I felt really bad about it, but we didn’t have the money. He’s had to fight for everything he’s got.” To compete nationally, Wolff dipped into the college fund that his grandmother set aside for him each year. Playing the AJGA circuit was expensive, so he traveled as frugally as possible: booking multi-stop flights, taking Uber to the course, sharing rooms with other competitors. If not more glamorous, high school golf at least offered some structure. Westlake Golf Club became the home base for the team, and it was there that Wolff first began seeing Gankas, the tech-savvy coach who in recent years has become a swing whisperer to the stars.  Gankas, 47, oozes SoCal chill in a flat-bill cap and flip-flops, but out of Westlake he ran the No. 1 junior program in the country. After school, kids battled to swing the fastest, smash drives the farthest and play best-of-five series at sharpshooting targets. Perhaps it was no surprise that Wolff’s Westlake teams became the first in the state to win back-to-back titles.  Still, Westlake is an unusual starting point for a revolution. It’s a modest, par-67 layout, with bumpy greens, a limited short-game area and a turf-mat range. A fence borders the property 310 yards away, and Wolff and another high school teammate routinely sailed drives onto the busy 101 Freeway. “I’d have to tell him, ‘Dude, you’re going to kill somebody,’” Gankas says. “The cops would come over and ask: ‘Who is hitting driver?’” After enough calls, Wolff – one of the top-ranked talents in the country – was forced to practice with limited-flight balls. Even though his peers marveled at his shot quality, Wolff desperately searched for validation. The head pro’s stinging criticism years earlier lingered and left him questioning his direction. “He always wanted to know what people thought of him,” says former Westlake teammate Spencer Soosman, who now plays at Texas. “He didn’t know how good he was.” But Wolff found a perfect match in Gankas, who was secure enough not to overhaul a natural swing that had proven successful. “I loved it when I first saw it,” Gankas says. “I was like, ‘This is sick.’ I thought for three weeks about changing some of those things, but then I said, ‘F— it, I’m not changing this kid.’” Your browser does not support iframes. EVEN CASUAL GOLF FANS don’t need the Konica Minolta Biz Hub Swing Vision Camera to discern that Wolff’s action is different than most. He starts by bumping into his left leg and shimmying – a swing trigger that began after he broke his collarbone in 2015, as a reminder to open his shoulders and hips before impact. Then he takes the club back vertically.  Then he gets to the top, makes a full turn and crosses the club across the line, with a high right elbow. Then uses his pivot to slot the club on the downswing. And finally he opens up, hard, using the ground for power and nearly jumping out of his size-10 1/2 spikes. “It’s basically a more athletic motion,” Gankas says. “We’re not putting him in positions and trying to make it perfect, like a math equation, or try to make him like a machine. He’s not a machine. He’s an athlete.” Wolff’s revolutionary swing produces a distinct thwack at impact and mind-blowing results on TrackMan: swing speed as high as 134 mph, ball speed that tops 190, drives that sail 350 yards. Throughout the swing his left foot comes off the ground and then replants – a move similar to what you’d find on the World Long Drive circuit. A biomechanist from Cal State Fullerton recently found that Wolff generated the most vertical force of any player ever measured on his Swing Catalyst; he digs into the turf so hard, and generates so much torque, that he literally rips up the grass underneath him. “It all works as one,” Wolff says. “I think a lot of people get really mechanical and feel like they have to be in certain places in their swings. For me, it’s more of a natural movement. I don’t really think of things when I swing. I just swing.” It’s not all uncontrolled power, either. Wolff hit 80 percent of his fairways last fall, with a 300-plus average. “For distance combined with accuracy, I don’t know how you could be better, really,” Oklahoma State coach Alan Bratton says. “It’s like walking around with a video game. You just tell him where to go and he does it.” It was Wolff and a few of his high school teammates who persuaded Gankas to start his Instagram account (@georgegankasgolf), which now boasts more than 110,000 followers. At first, Gankas used the site to post dozens of trophy shots of his students, like a proud papa, but as his popularity exploded he began to include slow-motion swing videos. Naturally, Wolff’s was the most unorthodox, and the various backswing positions were so unusual – at least compared to the cookie-cutter swings on the junior tours – that he became a lightning rod for criticism. “He eventually just said, ‘I can’t look at the comments anymore. It’s too hard,’” Shari Wolff says. “Especially when you’re younger, you don’t want to hear people criticize you. But once it was proven over and over and over again, he thought to himself, ‘Hmm, I must be doing something right.’ There’s a level of logic that feeds into it: ‘It can’t be that bad if I’m so good.’” So good, in fact, that Wolff reached the finals of both the U.S. Junior and AJGA Polo, and dominated the local Toyota Tour Cup series, gaining a fervent following on YouTube and social media. In late 2014, Bratton was hosting a potential recruit for lunch at Karsten Creek when the junior began talking about a tournament he’d just played in Southern California. He casually mentioned that the winner there had shot a course-record 61 in the final round, blowing away the field by 13. “Oh, really?” Bratton said, inching forward in his seat. “What was his name?” Within a few weeks, Bratton sent then-assistant Brian Guetz on a scouting mission.  After watching Wolff for a few swings, Guetz texted his boss: “Wait until you see this. You’re going to love it.” Your browser does not support iframes. AFTER INITIALLY COMMITTING TO stay close to home at Southern Cal, Wolff instead switched to Oklahoma State, the most storied program in men’s college golf. More than the allure of championships, OSU offered something that Wolff had longed for growing up – a world-class training facility. Karsten Creek Golf Club is essentially the team’s personal playground, with a dedicated staff equipped to handle all of their needs, from chefs and physiotherapists to an impeccable practice area and a punishing, Tom Fazio-designed course that recently hosted the NCAA Championships. “He finally became a country-club kid,” Shari Wolff says. “He has everything you’d ever need to be successful.” To his teammates, at least, Wolff’s swing is the least interesting thing about him.  At a business-like program that cranks out Tour types and demands discipline – players must shave on the road and own a 3.0 GPA to play the tournament in Hawaii – Wolff is unapologetically himself: extroverted and demonstrative, oozing jock swagger. After a recent interview, he shadowboxed the team’s sports information director, initiated conversations with, “What up, G?”, howled at a hilarious Instagram post, described a solid strike as “Purina” and pinned his assistant coach against the wall, as if scrapping for a puck along the boards. “He has this magnetic personality that people gravitate toward,” Shari Wolff says. “He pulls you into his universe, and you kinda want to be there.” Last fall, Wolff began to tire of the sheltered, 24/7 nature of elite college golf. A member of the OSU team hasn’t been a part of Greek life in two decades, but Wolff convinced Bratton that him and roommate Austin Eckroat should be allowed to join Phi Gamma Delta. As honorary members, they skipped the usual pledge activities, and they’re now officially frat boys, partaking in events like The Islander – where they rent out a sand lot by the lake, light tiki torches and blast country music to bring the “beach” to the heartland – and hooping in the annual rivalry game/fundraiser against Sigma Nu. “His golf swing explains his personality,” Eckroat says. “He’s just different from everybody else.” Your browser does not support iframes. THOSE WHO HADN’T FOLLOWED Gankas’ Instagram account finally got their first look at Wolff in May.   It’d already been a banner year before the NCAA Championship – four runners-up, first-team All-American, Phil Mickelson Award winner as the nation’s top freshman – but the six days in Stillwater were Wolff’s coming-out party in front of a national TV audience. The breathtaking speed, the titanium-denting power, the flair for the dramatic – they were all on display at Karsten Creek, as Wolff powered Oklahoma State in stroke play and then went 2-1 in match play as the Cowboys captured their 11th NCAA title (and first since 2006).  It takes three points for a team to win the championship, but it’s Wolff’s match that will be immortalized. Against Alabama’s Davis Riley, Wolff put on a near-flawless driving display, knocked down flags and rolled in clutch putts, none bigger than the national-title clincher in front of roughly 2,000 orange-clad fans.  That star-making performance didn’t surprise Soosman, Wolff’s old Westlake teammate: “He enjoys having all eyes on him, being the center of the show – that’s kind of who he is.” “If that’s the first impression that the world got of him,” Bratton says, “that’s a great start.” A wrist injury derailed his summer plans, but Wolff has been better than ever over the past two months. Winless since his sophomore year of high school, he has gone on a tear this fall, earning medalist honors at his first three tournaments while playing one of the country’s most difficult schedules. No longer does he have to wonder about his place in the college golf hierarchy; he’s ranked No. 1. “His upside, I don’t think you can put a limit on it,” OSU assistant Donnie Darr says. “There’s not a weakness in his game.” In fact, Wolff has been such a smashing success that, now, others are starting to copy him. Wolff’s swing is a frequent talking point during Gankas’ $350-an-hour lessons at Westlake, and one of his students, Web.com Tour player Johnny Ruiz, recently adopted Wolff’s action. Another Gankas disciple is trying to crack the Challenge Tour in Europe but recently became so demoralized after watching a Wolff stripe show that he pondered retirement. “It’s so stupid when people say it’s not going to last, or that it’s a terrible swing,” Soosman says. “It’s what’s normal to him. It’s going to last. It already has.” Your browser does not support iframes. WOLFF’S CULT-HERO FOLLOWING has created an interesting dynamic, as he’s the rare college golfer with at least some semblance of Internet fame. Up-and-coming talents used to toil away in anonymity, accumulating experience, but with Wolff’s high profile, each start is dissected and projected. It’s pro training, a few years early. The feverish activity that surrounds Wolff reminds Bratton of another former Oklahoma State legend, and the parallels with Fowler – a Southern California kid with a unique swing who bonded, trusted and emboldened his instructor – are interesting to consider. “He had an exciting style of golf,” says Bratton, who was an assistant coach for the two years that Fowler played for the Cowboys. “When I was recruiting him, I had a plan to go watch other people, but I couldn’t stop watching Rickie. Matt had a similar trait. It’s fun to watch him play. He does things that other guys can’t do.” Fowler returns to Stillwater a few times a year for various events, and in the spring he hosted the team at his house in South Florida. Wolff said they immediately hit it off. “I feel like me more than most people have a connection to him,” he says. “Everything you see with him, I have an ability to do, and it really motivates me and drives me. I want to be in his shoes someday.” It remains to be seen whether Wolff will possess the same mass appeal, but Bratton can’t think of a better role model for him – a fan favorite who plays a flashy brand of golf all his own, who interacts easily with everyone from CEOs to young fans, who hasn’t let the unrelenting grind of Tour life dull his enthusiasm for the sport.  “Our counsel for Matt will be, like Rickie, to continue to look like the same little kid as when you started,” Bratton says. “Don’t let the world make this so important that it’s not fun anymore, because that’s what’s going to draw people to him – the joy that he plays the game with and the style of play that he has. It’s exciting. It’s fun. He makes a lot of birdies and does it looking like he’s enjoying himself, and not everyone does that.  “I think golf fans are going to love him.” Yeah, it’s all love now, which is funny to those who have grown up watching Wolff play, who have seen the torrent of social-media criticism, who have heard the other parents, players and professionals dismiss him. Because they already know – all it usually takes is one swing, one round, one tournament to become a believer. To recognize that Wolff has the goods. “They’ve talked s— for six years,” Gankas says, “but then once they see him hit the ball, it’s all good and he’s the greatest and they say it’s one of the purest moves on the planet.  “I know for a fact that he’s going to change the world of golf. People are going to lose their minds.”last_img read more

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Suri, Shinkwin share 54-hole lead at Indian Open

first_imgNEW DELHI – Julian Suri and Callum Shinkwin share a two-shot lead at the Indian Open after a dramatic finish to the third round on Saturday. Shinkwin shot a 4-under 68 before Suri (71) sent a terrible tee shot into a hazard on the par-5 18th, leading to a double bogey for the American. That left both players at 11-under 205 after three rounds. ”I think a couple of the mistakes I made today were after long waits on the tee box and that was quite a long wait on 18,” Suri said. ”No excuses, totally my fault, and I need to compose myself better and I think that is a bit of a learning curve for me after being out of tournament golf for a while now.” This is only Suri’s second event of the season after undergoing surgery on an abdominal hernia but he has played well, going 67-67 on the first two days. Full-field scores from Hero Indian Open Suri, who started the day with the lead, has won once before on the European Tour, at the Denmark Open in 2017. England’s Shinkwin shot a 7-under 65 on Friday. Japan’s Masahiro Kawamura (68) made a good recovery from a triple bogey on the par-5 eighth and sits at 9 under, a shot ahead of Scotland’s Stephen Gallacher(67) in fourth.last_img read more

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Irreconcilable Differences: Can Darwinism Be Pasteurized?

first_imgCongratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour TagsCharles DarwinDarwin Day in AmericaDarwinian medicineeugenicsGeorge DraperInternational Medical CongressJohn WestJonathan WellsJoshua LederbergKarl PearsonLouis PasteurmedicineMichael BeheMichael EgnormicrobesNazismPasteur Vallery-RadotPasteurizationPierre-Olivier Méthotpublic healthRené DubosSamuel AlizonThe Edge of EvolutionZombie Science,Trending Evolution Evolution NewsEvolution News & Science Today (EN) provides original reporting and analysis about evolution, neuroscience, bioethics, intelligent design and other science-related issues, including breaking news about scientific research. It also covers the impact of science on culture and conflicts over free speech and academic freedom in science. Finally, it fact-checks and critiques media coverage of scientific issues. Share Michael Egnor has criticized so-called “Darwinian medicine” as a useless concept, since medical science has had spectacular success without it. Darwinism is about the death of the unfit, focused on populations instead of individuals. Medicine is about healing individuals and anyone who needs help, including the unfit, the weak, and the vulnerable. How can the father of evolutionary theory, Charles Darwin, and the father of biogenesis, pasteurization and vaccines, Louis Pasteur, be reconciled?In PLOS Biology, Samuel Alizon and Pierre-Olivier Méthot try to do just that. Their paper is titled, “Reconciling Pasteur and Darwin to control infectious diseases.” It’s a noble aim to control diseases, but can their conciliatory approach work?The continual emergence of new pathogens and the increased spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations remind us that microbes are living entities that evolve at rates that impact public health interventions. Following the historical thread of the works of Pasteur and Darwin shows how reconciling clinical microbiology, ecology, and evolution can be instrumental to understanding pathology, developing new therapies, and prolonging the efficiency of existing ones. [Emphasis added.]The authors point out that Darwin and Pasteur probably never communicated. “Pasteur and Darwin both attended the International Medical Congress in London in 1881 but did not exchange words,” they say. It’s doubtful that Pasteur’s words to Darwin would have been friendly. According to his grandson, Pasteur’s worldview had more in common with intelligent design than with Darwinian naturalism:Something deep in our soul tells us that the universe is more than an arrangement of certain compounds in a mechanical equilibrium, arisen from the chaos of elements by a gradual action of Nature’s forces. (Pasteur Vallery-Radot, Louis Pasteur, p. 157-158).Pasteur was also a deeply religious man, and adamantly anti-materialistic. He said:Posterity will one day laugh at the foolishness of modern materialistic philosophers. The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator. I pray while I am engaged at my work in the laboratory. (The Literary Digest, 18 October 1902, via Wikiquote).It’s not hard to guess which “modern materialistic philosophers” Pasteur had in mind. Alizon and Méthot know that the two men came from strongly different philosophical perspectives.The life and contributions of these two scientists may seem radically different at first (Fig 1): while Charles Darwin worked mostly alone (despite a large network of correspondents), gathered field data to support his theories, wrote books, and did relatively few experiments, Louis Pasteur led an ‘army’ of research assistants who performed a wide array of experiments, wrote research articles, and typically addressed applied problems of industrial or public health interest. In addition to having different research methods, they had contrasting religious outlooks; Pasteur was known for his devout personality, while Darwin described himself as ‘agnostic’ late in his life. However, both researchers shared the singular ability of being able to make sense of seemingly independent observations. Both also had a profound impact on medicine during their life, without being themselves medical doctors.“Both also had a profound impact on medicine,” eh? Yes, we see that with Pasteur, whose vaccines and discoveries in microbiology have saved countless millions of lives. For Darwin, the story is quite different, as John West has recounted in Darwin Day in America, particularly in Chapters 13-15. And if Darwin’s motivations for Nazi ideology, eugenics and totalitarian dictatorships are included, we could call Darwin’s approach the medicine of death, and Pasteur’s the medicine of life.It looks like a hard sell to unite these men from polar opposite ends of worldview spectrum. Let’s see if Alizon and Méthot can pull it off. They readily acknowledge their challenge:Evolutionary biology currently has a marginal place within medicine. There is even a significant tendency to avoid the ‘e-word’ in the biomedical literature when referring to antimicrobial resistance. Yet in the 19th century, medical sciences were as enthusiastic for Darwin’s ideas as they were initially hostile to Pasteur’s. This support, often implicit, progressively came to a halt in the 20th century for at least two reasons. First, the intellectual proximity between evolution, eugenics, and medicine, most clearly articulated in Karl Pearson’s 1912 address (‘Darwinism, medical progress, and eugenics’) and in George Draper’s constitutional medicine, made scientists wary of implementing evolutionary approaches in medicine, particularly after World War II. Experimentation on human subjects in Nazi Germany revulsed public opinion worldwide and ended eugenic policies, at least in the public discourse.Scary last phrase there: “at least in the public discourse.” What’s happening behind closed doors at scientific institutions? Some evolutionists are very open about their eugenic views, as Michael Egnor has shown.The second reason for lack of interest in Darwinian medicine, the authors say, is that “evolutionary biology was still largely viewed as an observational science and no longer had a place within the new configuration of medical knowledge and training organized around specialities [sic] and characterized by experimentation.” That tells us something important about Darwinism; it’s less in the scientific business of experimentation as it is in the art of weaving narratives in order to fit observations into Darwin’s picture of the world.Having acknowledged the challenge before them, Alizon and Méthot make a plea for integrating evolution into medical training. The way they define evolution, though, makes their particular advice uncontroversial:There is now increasing support for the teaching of evolutionary biology in medical faculties. When teaching medical students, however, one should call attention to the set of assumptions often made regarding ancestral lifestyles or the adaptative [sic] value of certain traits or behaviours. Furthermore, it should be emphasized that medicine and evolution have different ‘conceptual bases’ and are typically concerned with different problems: whereas the former focuses on restoring health at the individual level, the latter studies biological variations at the population level and how they change over time.If that is all they are talking about, nobody will make a fuss. Even the most ardent creationists acknowledge “biological variations at the population level and how they change over time.” The question then becomes, what has Darwin got to do with this plea? Variation has been observed for millennia. What made Darwinism so controversial was his claim that the entire biosphere emerged from one primitive cell by blind, unguided processes. To argue that, he had to make natural selection a creative force, able to create wings and eyes where none existed before.In the bulk of their essay, Alizon and Méthot talk about antibacterial resistance (see Jonathan Wells, Zombie Science, Chapter 8, for discussion of what that has to do with Darwinism). They suggest medical practices that are best suited to effectively control outbreaks of resistant strains. Darwinism seems only marginally involved here, supported by occasional references to “evolutionary arms race” situations and “co-evolution.” The authors illustrate it with examples, such as when a doctor’s ‘hit hard and hit fast’ strategy with antibiotics actually creates conditions for virulent mutants to multiply. Nothing about this need involve Darwin, however. It’s population dynamics, not creation of novelty.They mention “the emergence of new infections,” saying “Emergence often involves adaptation to new hosts,” but that doesn’t involve the origin of species or the creation of novel complex designs. As Michael Behe cogently pointed out in The Edge of Evolution, mutants become resistant by breaking things. A bacterium might break its interface with a drug, for instance, achieving resistance but not creating anything new. In a recent ID the Future episode, Ann Gauger described this kind of “evolution” as “throwing the deck chairs off to make the boat go faster.”The interplay between parasite and host has more to do with ecology than evolution. Alizon and Méthot repeatedly conflate the two, making it sound as if dynamic interplays of variants in parasites and hosts are always Darwinian in nature. Not necessarily; if no new information is added, and if no truly innovative complex structure is created, then neither organism makes the kind of upward progress Darwin envisioned. It’s a demolition derby. The ship that throws off the most cargo and remains the afloat would win. That kind of ‘evolution’ is not what Darwin had in mind. One of the illustrations in Alizon and Méthot’s paper shows resistant strains already present in the host, given the opportunity to proliferate when antibiotics kill off most of the non-resistant cells.Typically, resistant strains lose ability to compete in the wild, only succeeding in artificial environments like hospitals. The authors even point this out:Based on datasets from the United States and Ireland, it has also been argued that larger hospital sizes favour the spread of antibiotic resistance, one interpretation being that a network of small hospitals maximises the risk of stochastic extinctions of newly emerged resistant variants.Those “stochastic extinctions” occur because the newly emerged resistant variants cannot compete in more realistic environments, where wild-type strains have not had to throw their cargo and deck chairs overboard. Understanding such ecological factors leads some hospitals to release patients earlier to their homes, so that the reservoirs of resistant strains have to compete with stronger (and less virulent) strains in the natural environment. Some hospitals are providing environments like gardens where patients can be exposed to less hygienic, natural conditions. These settings encourage recovery not only by driving resistant strains extinct faster, but by providing patients with opportunities for mental well-being that natural beauty engenders.Additionally, evidence is growing that bacteria can obtain resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer, such as from soil bacteria. If so, there’s nothing Darwinian about this, either. The sharing of pre-existing information indicates design, not evolution.In conclusion, there is an urgent need to switch from an eradication to a control perspective as already advocated in 1955 by René Dubos or in 2000 by Joshua Lederberg. We should add to the search for ‘magic bullets’ the development of strategies to manage and mitigate pathogen evolution. In that sense, interventions that have a strong ecological and evolutionary dimension, such as microbiota transplantation, new ways of administrating drugs (varying doses, alternating or combining molecules), or even advances in phage therapy, could be the future of public health.All the proposed benefits of “ecological perspectives” in medicine can be achieved without Darwinism. It’s hard to understand why some Darwinists are so intent on importing Darwinism into a field that doesn’t need it and has suffered from it.On what basis can Alizon and Méthot plead that their advice would be good for suffering humans? What’s Darwin got to do with help for the weak? Humans, in Darwin’s view, arrived by accident, have no exceptional value, and will go extinct in time. The Darwinian view of humanity is amoral and heartless. If the bacteria win over the human, it just shows who won the evolutionary arms race and demonstrated survival of the fittest. If you see a Darwinian doctor at your bedside, pull the alarm, because you won’t be able to tell if he is rooting for you or for the germs.The best way to Pasteurize medicine is to raise the heat till the harmful Darwinian ideas, like eugenics and survival of the fittest, die off. The result will be a vibrant medical enterprise promoting human health and well-being with pure motives. A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesiscenter_img “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Medicine Irreconcilable Differences: Can Darwinism Be Pasteurized?Evolution News @DiscoveryCSCFebruary 20, 2018, 1:47 AM Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Recommended Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Sharelast_img read more

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