Vaccine critic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. says he will chair Trump’s vaccine safety panel

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Politics What is it? Robert F. Kennedy Jr. arrives in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. Evan Vucci/AP Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Sheila Kaplan and Dylan Scott Jan. 10, 2017 Reprints What’s included? Vaccine critic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. says he will chair Trump’s vaccine safety panel WASHINGTON — Outspoken vaccine critic Robert Kennedy Jr. said Tuesday that he had accepted a position in Donald Trump’s administration as chair of a panel on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, in what would be the clearest sign yet of the president-elect’s suspicions about vaccines.Kennedy’s remarks followed his meeting with the president-elect at Trump Tower and immediately sparked outrage from scientists, pediatricians, and public health experts, who fear the incoming administration could give legitimacy to skeptics of childhood immunizations despite a huge body of scientific research demonstrating that vaccines are safe. Many of those skeptics believe vaccines are a cause of autism. GET STARTED Tags policypublic health Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More last_img read more

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Ex-drug company CEO Shkreli to speak at Harvard

first_img Associated Press Tags Martin Shkrelipharmaceuticals By Associated Press Feb. 12, 2017 Reprints CAMBRIDGE, Mass.  — Controversial former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli is set to speak at Harvard while out on bail awaiting his federal securities fraud trial.The former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals is expected to talk about investing and healthcare at an event organized by the Harvard Financial Analysts Club. The talk on Wednesday is open to the Harvard community only.Shkreli drew sharp criticism after his company purchased the rights to a drug used by AIDS and cancer patients to fight parasitic infections and raised its price from less than $17 to $750 per pill.advertisement The 33-year-old New York resident is free on $5 million bail pending his federal securities fraud trial in an unrelated case. He has pleaded not guilty. A judge on Thursday approved his request to travel to Massachusetts.center_img About the Author Reprints Former drug company CEO Martin Shkreli. Susan Walsh/AP BusinessEx-drug company CEO Shkreli to speak at Harvard last_img read more

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Bristol-Myers shuffles management and its chief strategy officer is leaving

first_imgPharmalot Bristol-Myers shuffles management and its chief strategy officer is leaving GET STARTED By Ed Silverman April 24, 2017 Reprints Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints [email protected] Following setbacks with an important cancer drug, Bristol-Myers Squibb reorganized some key managerial slots last week and, as part of the shuffling, chief strategy officer Emmanuel Blin will leave in June, according to a memo written by chief executive officer Giovanni Caforio.The drug maker is integrating all commercial functions into one organization and Murdo Gordon, who is the chief commercial officer, will expand his responsibilities to include both worldwide oncology commercial activities and specialty drugs. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? @Pharmalot Ed Silverman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More What’s included? Tags pharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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The FDA may move to shorten that grim list of side effects in every drug ad. Advertising execs can’t wait

first_img Megan Thielking Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Megan Thielking June 28, 2017 Reprints News Editor Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Molly Ferguson for STAT Politics STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprintscenter_img Warning: Watching TV drug ads may put you to sleep.That’s no surprise to many of us who’ve heard about the countless ways prescription drugs can harm us. But now, the Food and Drug Administration is considering whether bombarding consumers with every last potential side effect might be overkill. The agency, which approves prescription drugs and oversees how they’re marketed, is proposing a new study to look at whether patients are being “over-warned” to the point that they stop paying attention. Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? What is it? @meggophone [email protected] The FDA may move to shorten that grim list of side effects in every drug ad. Advertising execs can’t wait Tags financepatientspolicylast_img read more

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It’s not just athletes: Doctors at the Olympics have also worked years to get there

first_imgHealthIt’s not just athletes: Doctors at the Olympics have also worked years to get there Please enter a valid email address. Tags physicians Leave this field empty if you’re human: At the games themselves, much of what doctors deal with is “just travel medicine,” Rodeo said. “So, we’ll get a lot of stomachaches and everything that comes with eating different food or drinking different water or switching to a different time zone.”But literally anything can happen, said Tee.“On the 18th hole of golf, a guy from South America got too excited and fell down and ruptured a ligament in his ankle,” he recalled. “A Hong Kong swimmer fainted, another athlete got stung by a bee. And everybody was worried about Zika.”The job can be demanding in other ways, too. It’s a significant commitment of not just money but time. “Over the time I was trying out, I was away from my practice for six months, and lost about a quarter of a million dollars,” said Hutchinson.“You give up a lot to do it,” Rodeo said. “And it’s not just the financial issues. It’s time away from your patients.”Among Rodeo’s patients are NFL players on the New York Giants. He said he is grateful that he can work with the Summer Olympics in the off season. “Some people can’t take that time away from their practice,” he said.The reward is the opportunity to work long, hard days at a far-off locale.“It’s volunteerism at its best,” said Rodeo. “You do it because you want to give back. You have to love it to do it.”Pascal, who has gone to the Olympics five times, agreed. “The hours are long but the memories last a lifetime,” he said. “And you get some really cool USA clothes.” Related: Related: Snowboarder Jacqueline Hernandez of the United States is stretchered off the course by medics after a fall during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images Another kind of superbug: Seeking an edge in the elite athlete’s microbiome As Team USA preps for the Winter Olympics festivities to kick off this weekend, it’s not only the 243 athletes who are getting ready for action — it’s also a crew of medical volunteers who undergo a grueling selection process of their own.The official U.S. Olympic Committee’s Sports Medicine Division recruits a crew of volunteer doctors — as well as orthopedists, chiropractors, nurses, sports therapists, massage therapists, and more — every two years. Those selected will work with Olympic teams during training and practices and ultimately at the games themselves — some caring for one team exclusively; others moving around as the need arises. And they do it all uncompensated.It’s a lot to ask from a volunteer, but former Olympic physicians say the experience is worth it. “I knew I wasn’t going to make it there as an athlete,” said Dr. Mark Hutchinson, an orthopedist in Chicago. “But I thought that as a doctor, I could go and enjoy Olympic glory vicariously.”advertisementcenter_img Privacy Policy Big-calorie days are a necessary part of Olympic training Hutchinson was a volunteer physician at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, working primarily with the equestrian and rhythmic gymnast teams.But the process of getting there began years prior.advertisement Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. By Leah Samuel Feb. 8, 2018 Reprints As with any selective process, it starts with the application. Applicants must be licensed or certified, have at least three years of experience, and have no felonies, disciplinary actions, or sanctions. Doctors also must have a current Drug Enforcement Administration registration, at least $1 million in malpractice insurance, and current certification in using CPR and external defibrillators. They will also need certification in sports medicine, for which some applicants will need additional coursework before they can apply to the Olympics. With a pile of documents and a $90 application fee to cover the background check, the process begins.If all checks out, applicants will visit a U.S. Olympic Training Center — in Chula Vista, Calif.; Colorado Springs, Colo.; or Lake Placid, N.Y. — for further training, interviews, and to care for athletes who are in training.“You have a kind of internship type of thing, where you get to know their system, [and] they get to know you, basically,” said Dr. Scott Rodeo, a sports medicine surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery who volunteered with the U.S. Olympic swim team in 2004, 2008, and 2012. “Then you start with smaller competitions.”This is where the doctors’ real tryouts happen. The USOC routinely emails applicants notices of volunteer medical rotations at national events like Olympic qualifiers or international competitions like the Pan American Games. Medical team applicants race to sign up for these rotations, which are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. If they get an assignment, they must travel to the event location at their own expense. “You get invited to travel with a team — like basketball or field hockey — and you just go,” said Hutchinson.At these events, they work alongside other applicants, evaluating and treating athletes, coaches, and guests. They are on call for all emergencies. They assist at the on-site sports medicine clinic, helping athletes put on braces or tape, do stretches, or other preparations. They’re required to attend all team practices and even to help set up and take down equipment, in addition to maintaining paperwork and helping with cleaning and laundry.And all under scrutiny.“At any time, you can be told, ‘Thank you for your service,’ then you’re done there and sent home,” said Hutchinson. “Some people didn’t make it because they got bad comments from athletes or the coaches didn’t like them.”“You need to be ready to work and check your ego at the door,” said Rodeo. “It’s a little bit like residency.”And the process can be longer than most medical residencies. Doctors hoping to get to the Olympics can spend two, five, or even 15 years working events and training.Meanwhile, the USOC further narrows down the number of applicants at various points along the way. Those selected to attend to athletes at the Olympics usually learn of their selection the year before, after a process as mysterious as it is arduous.“You get an email saying you’ve been selected,” said Dr. Kim Tee, a Chicago podiatrist who volunteered with the U.S. golf team in Rio in 2016. “After you meet all the criteria. But the criteria, that is something only the committee knows.”There are some shortcuts to help your case, however.“You want to keep your name in front of the committee, but not just be in their face all the time,” said Hutchinson. “So I got around that by sending them an updated CV once in a while, with a friendly note.”Or there are other approaches. “Sometimes you can get one of the athletes to write a letter to the committee saying that they like working with you and they want to work with you at the Olympics,”explained volunteer Dr. David Pascal, a North Carolina chiropractor.last_img read more

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Pfizer CEO predicts that controversial rebates are ‘going away’

first_img Ed Silverman Pfizer CEO predicts that controversial rebates are ‘going away’ What is it? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Pfizer chief executive officer Ian Read CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricingpharmaceuticals Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot center_img @Pharmalot What’s included? [email protected] In his first public remarks since rescinding price hikes, Pfizer chief executive officer Ian Read predicted the controversial rebates that drug makers pay to pharmacy benefit managers will soon disappear.“I believe we are going to go to a marketplace where we don’t have rebates,” Read reportedly said during a conference call on Tuesday to discuss Pfizer earnings. “Rebates are going away.” By Ed Silverman July 31, 2018 Reprints GET STARTED About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more

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A SCOTUS case on ‘cobra sexual energy’ supplements highlights FDA’s oversight of a growing industry

first_img JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags courtsgovernment agenciespolicysexual health Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Politics Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” WASHINGTON — They aren’t the type of words that usually show up in Supreme Court briefs, but on Tuesday, they will be there just the same: Cobra Sexual Energy.The court is set to hear oral arguments in Nutraceutical Corp. v. Lambert, the latest flash point in a five-year spat between unsatisfied California men and Nutraceutical Corp., a supplement company that sells a dietary supplement called “Cobra Sexual Energy” that contains a mix of horny goat weed, yohimbe, and potency wood, and that the company boasts will help with “animal magnetism.” GET STARTED Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included?center_img @NicholasFlorko By Nicholas Florko Nov. 26, 2018 Reprints About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More A SCOTUS case on ‘cobra sexual energy’ supplements highlights FDA’s oversight of a growing industry [email protected] Nicholas Florko What is it?last_img read more

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FDA signs off on Editas CRISPR study on patients with a rare genetic disorder

first_img What is it? Ruby Wallau for STAT Biotech [email protected] @damiangarde What’s included? National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Days after a Chinese researcher incensed the world of science with claims of editing the genomes of twin girls, an American company is plotting a CRISPR trial of its own. But in place of the secrecy and stagecraft that marked the Chinese experiment, Editas Medicine went the old-fashioned way: waiting for approval from the Food and Drug Administration.The company, headquartered in Cambridge, Mass., got the FDA’s blessing to test a CRISPR-based therapy on patients with a rare genetic disorder that leads to blindness. Editas, which is partnered with Botox maker Allergan, said it plans to enroll between 10 and 20 patients in a study to test the treatment’s safety and efficacy. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. FDA signs off on Editas CRISPR study on patients with a rare genetic disorder center_img By Damian Garde Nov. 30, 2018 Reprints GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Damian Garde Log In | Learn More Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Tags biotechnologyBostongenetics Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.last_img read more

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Trump, claiming progress in lowering drug prices, tells Congress ‘we must do more’

first_img By Ike Swetlitz Feb. 5, 2019 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Politics Trump, claiming progress in lowering drug prices, tells Congress ‘we must do more’ What is it? What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP Log In | Learn More Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED WASHINGTON — In his State of the Union address Tuesday, President Trump touted his administration’s work to reduce the price of prescription drugs and called on Congress to take further action.But his remarks on the issue were light on specifics — and in some cases, misleading. Tags Congressdrug pricinggovernment agenciespolicyWhite Houselast_img read more

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HHS to probe whether Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ followed federal privacy law

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags Artificial Intelligencegovernment agenciesHealth IThospitals Casey Ross A federal regulator is investigating whether the federal privacy law known as HIPAA was followed when Google collected millions of patient records through a partnership with nonprofit hospital chain Ascension.The probe, first reported by the Wall Street Journal Tuesday night, was opened by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights. “OCR would like to learn more information about this mass collection of individuals’ medical records with respect to the implications for patient privacy under HIPAA,” Roger Severino, the office’s director, said in a statement to STAT. @caseymross Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Health Tech David Ramos/Getty Images By Rebecca Robbins and Casey Ross Nov. 13, 2019 Reprints What’s included?center_img National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. GET STARTED About the Authors Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] What is it? Log In | Learn More HHS to probe whether Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ followed federal privacy law last_img read more

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