Mad Tea Party Jam 4 Announces Phase One Lineup: Turkuaz, TAUK, Aqueous, Earphunk and More!

first_imgMad Tea Party Jam 4 has revealed their first of three lineup announcements, and this one is a doozy! The festival, which is held in Hedgesville, WV from June 18-21, will see performances from a number of L4LM favorites, including:TurkuazTAUKAqueous x2Earphunk x2Vibe and DirectBrokedown HustlersMojofloTickets for Mad Tea Party Jam 4 are currently available via the festival’s official website.last_img

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Widespread Panic Announces Panic En La Playa Nueve Dates & Lineup

first_imgOn Tuesday, Athens, Georgia road warriors Widespread Panic officially announced the details for the 2020 edition of Panic En La Playa, their annual beachside destination event. The 9th installation of Panic En La Playa will take place January 24th through 28th, 2020, at the Hard Rock Hotel & Resort in Riviera Maya, Mexico.As always, Panic En La Playa will feature four full Widespread Panic shows. The late-night schedule for the Cloud 9 Adventures-produced event includes sets by The Marcus King Band, BIG Something, Andy Frasco & The U.N., and Jerry Joseph in addition to performances by the Playa Allstars—this year comprised of Eric Krasno, George Porter Jr., Ivan Neville, Cyril Neville, Jennifer Hartswick, Terence Higgins, and Cheme Gastelum.The event allows fans to enjoy some of their favorite artists in a tropical setting without ever pulling out their wallets, as all drinks, food, concerts, and activities/excursions are included in the ticket price. Those who have attended Panic En La Playa in past years will get the first crack at tickets for the 2020 event when loyalty pre-sale begins on Tuesday, July 9th. Public on-sale opens at 12 p.m. (EST) the following day, Wednesday, July 10th. For more information on Panic En La Playa Nueve, head to the event website.last_img read more

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Neighbourhood watches get more resources

first_imgCouncillor JP Smith with members of a neighbourhood watch. The City of Cape Town will employ four more community liaison officers to support neighbourhood watch organisations.The neighbourhood watch support programme helps organisations to become registered, offers training to members and also provides equipment for use during their patrols.In the last financial year, reflective jackets, torches, spotlights, dashboard cameras, action cameras, bicycles, first aid kits, flood lights and fire extinguishers were distributed to various organisations. During the same period, handheld radios to the value of nearly R1.5 million were distributed to help watch members communicate with one another and to provide a direct line to the Metro police call centre in the event of emergencies.Mayco member for safety and security; and social services, JP Smith, said; “Just a few months ago, we provided a container for the neighbourhood watch in the Kosovo informal settlement in Philippi. That container can now serve as a base where members can congregate and plan their operations, but it is also somewhere for the community to turn for help if they need it.”The City of Cape Town has also facilitated opportunities for unemployed watch members to be appointed as facility protection officers through the Expanded Public Works Programme. “We owe our neighbourhood watches an immense debt of gratitude. They are our eyes and ears on the ground and there are many success stories of safer streets as a result of the work they do. The City will continue to build partnerships with communities by supporting the amazing work being done by neighbourhood watches and we will continue to invest in them to the best of our ability to ensure that they are able to continue their crucial contribution to the efforts to root out crime, but also anti-social nuisances that plague so many communities,” said Mr Smith.last_img read more

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Besta FC makes NSL final

first_imgBESTA United PNG FC have proven bookies wrong after earning their first National Soccer League grand final while defending premiers Lae City Toti FC scaled a tight-rope finish in a penalty shootout for their third grand final appearance. Toti FC defeated Madang FC 5-4 in a penalty shootout of the other semi-final against Madang on Sunday. Crowd favourites FC Morobe Wawens missed out in a place for the grand final but it would be a sweet finish to their inaugural NSL 2018 season. The PNG Besta United FC will now take on Toti FC who are chasing their fourth consecutive title in the grand final in Lae on Saturday. Toti FC goalkeeper and Solomon Islands bound Ronald Warisan made up for miscalculated runoff from his goal mouth and sealed the 11-man penalty shootout with the winning goal for the 5-4 win against Madang FC. The scores were tied 2-2 at fulltime with Madang having a better luck throughout the match but didn’t have the capacity to hold off the sleek comeback by Toti FC, even if it was the dying seconds to full-time. Despite Madang dominance, Toti FC never let down their guards with captain Raymond Gunemba leading their charge for their comeback to eventually win. Madang FC striker Emmanuel Airem found the net early to lead 1-0 after Warisan left the goal mouth unattended in the first half and 15 minutes into the second half, Gunemba beat two defenders before setting Jacob Sabua for the equaliser. With the scores at 1-1 at full time, the game was forced into 20 minutes extra time and Madang’s supremacy mustered the tie breaker to midfielder Samuel Kini to lead 2-1. From there, Madang would just have to hold on but it was too much as they gave away a penalty through a hand ball. Gunemba found the target to see the scores level 2-2 at the end of extra time. And the fanfare continued to the third option of penalty shootout with scores again tied 3-all after the first five shots from both sides. The call for the next six to the penalty shootout weighed in on Madang FC claiming four out of six while Toti clipped one ahead for five out of six to win 5-4 in the end. Lae City Toti FC meet Besta PNG United in the 2018 NSL grand final on Saturday.last_img read more

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Website terms & conditions of use

first_imgIntroductionYour use of the websiteGeneral disclaimerChoice of lawAccuracy of informationYour privacyCopyright and use of materialYour commentsLinks and linkingExclusion of liabilityContact details IntroductionWelcome to the SouthAfrica.info website www.southafrica.info. The website provides information about the country for Brand South Africa (Brand SA). The website is owned by Brand SA, hosted by Private Label Web Solutions, and is located within the Republic of South Africa.By accessing and using this website, you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions set out in this notice. If you do not wish to be bound by these terms and conditions, then you may not access, display, use, download, copy or distribute any of the content of this website.Your use of the websiteYou agree that your use of this website is for lawful purposes only. You agree that you will not use this website for any unlawful purpose, including committing a criminal offence, gaining unauthorised access to other computer systems, or transmitting unlawful material.General disclaimerYou agree to access and use this site entirely at your own risk. Please read the Exclusion of Liability clauses below.Choice of lawThis website is owned and operated within the Republic of South Africa. Therefore, these terms and conditions are governed by the laws of the Republic of South Africa, and the user consents to the jurisdiction of the Witwatersrand High Court in the event of any dispute.Accuracy of informationWhile every effort is made to ensure that the information provided on this website is current and accurate, you should not assume that this is always the case, and should consult other sources before making any decision to act on this information.Your privacyWe respect the privacy of all visitors to this site. 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However, you agree not to transmit any material that is unlawful, harmful, defamatory, abusive, threatening, vulgar or obscene. You remain liable to any third party for your comments, and Brand SA is not liable to any third party for the content of your comments.Please also note that we cannot respond to all feedback we receive. Comments: Brand South Africa External links and advertisingWherever this website provides links to other websites, this should not be construed as constituting any relationship or endorsement of the linked third party, and reliance on all information provided by the external link is done so at your own risk.Wherever third party advertising or promotional material is displayed on this website, this should not be construed as Brand SA endorsing or creating any relationship between Brand SA and that third party. Reliance on any such material is entirely at your own risk.LinkingAny third party wishing to link to this website from their website must obtain permission from Brand SA, and permission may be granted on terms and conditions agreed.Exclusion of liabilityYou expressly agree that the use of this website is entirely at your own risk. The website and all its contents are provided on an “as is” basis, and Brand SA makes no representations or warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, to the accuracy of the contents of the website. Brand SA does not warrant that the website’s functions will be uninterrupted or error-free, or that the site or its server is free from viruses or other harmful components.Brand SA, its owners, directors, employees, officials, suppliers, agents and/or representatives shall not be liable for any loss or damage, whether direct, indirect or consequential, or any expense of any nature whatsoever, which may be suffered by the user, which arises directly or indirectly from reliance of the website and/or its content.Brand SA, its agents or suppliers shall not be responsible for any direct or indirect special consequential or other damage of any kind whatsoever suffered or incurred by you related to your use of, or your inability to access or use, the content or the website or any functionality of the website or of any linked website, even where Brand SA is expressly advised thereof.You will indemnify Brand SA, its owners, directors, employees, officials, agents, suppliers or representatives, and keep them fully indemnified, from and against any loss or damage suffered or liability incurred in respect of any third party, which arises from your use of this website.Contact details for any purposes related to these terms and conditionsTelephone: +27 (0)11 483-0122Fax: +27 (0)11 483-0124E-mail: [email protected]last_img read more

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R25bn package to stimulate growth

first_img25 October 2011 Gordhan pointed out that there were also “improved incentives for investment in industrial development zones, particularly where there is potential to participate in global supply chains and to develop competitive logistics hubs”. “This means that we need a reserve of funds, and a capacity to direct these resources effectively,” Gordhan told parliamentarians in Cape Town. He renewed the call for export diversification, including new trade partnerships with fast-growing emerging economies, as well as regional integration within sub-Saharan Africa, including investment in a north-south transport corridor and administrative reform of trade arrangements The government had also introduced regulatory and administrative reforms to facilitate small business development, including bringing on board support mechanisms such as preferential procurement and finance facilities. Gordhan said the package would include temporary mechanisms to bolster productivity and innovation in industries that had demonstrated long-term competitive potential. The R25-billion would include R8-billion in tax incentives for recently approved projects in the area of industrial development, technology support and training.center_img South African Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan has unveiled a R25-billion support package over the next six years to boost industrial development, assist entrepreneurs and accelerate job creation in the country. Delivering his Medium-Term Budget Policy Speech in Parliament on Tuesday, Gordhan said the central thrust of South Africa’s economic policy challenge was “to support competitiveness and promote the kinds of structural change that will lead to more rapid, inclusive growth. Gordhan added that there was a need to “align trade, investment and energy policies to support the transition to a ‘green’ economy, including private sector participation in [South Africa’s] renewable energy production programme”. During a media briefing held ahead of the speech, the minister said the details of the package would soon be revealed by Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Education rights affirmed

first_imgThe information in the charter provides an indication of what children, their parents and other caregivers may expect of the education system.(Image: Ray Maota) Lindiwe Mokate of the SAHRC said that the right to a basic education is a constitutionally protected right that is unequivocally guaranteed to all children in South Africa. (Image: SAHRC) MEDIA CONTACTS • Isaac Mangena   SAHRC: Communications Coordinator  + 27 11 877 3603 RELATED ARTICLES • New uniforms for needy pupils • Class of 2012 does it better • Teaching teens to fish • Safeguarding our future leadersRay MaotaA charter on basic education has been drawn up to clarify the South African government’s obligation to provide quality education to children, and to track its progress.The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) has established its Charter of Children’s Basic Education Rights, and each year will measure progress against the charter using national and provincial data from Statistics South Africa, the Department of Basic Education and other research. While the charter is not legally binding on the state, it gives advice on how the state can meet its obligations, and will monitor its education delivery. South Africa is the third country in the world after Ireland and the United Kingdom to have a basic education charter.Lindiwe Mokate, the commissioner for children’s rights at the SAHRC, said: “The right to a basic education is a constitutionally protected right that is unequivocally guaranteed to all children in South Africa. It is considered a central facilitative right that is not qualified by expressions such as ‘available resources’, ‘progressive realisation’, or ‘reasonable legislative measures’, which are applicable to other socio-economic rights enshrined in our Constitution.”She added that it had increasingly been recognised at an international level that national human rights institutions were best placed to determine the monitoring indicators for economic and social rights given their independent nature and knowledge of local conditions.“The charter provides a statement of the various obligations of the state to ensure the realisation of the right to basic education, notes key shortcomings and inequities, revisits commitments made to address the gaps in achieving quality education, and the key role players are identified,” said Mokate.Aida Girma, Unicef’s representative in South Africa, said that the right to education was invaluable in attempts to eradicate poverty and tackle these challenges. “It is my hope that this charter will contribute to renewal of, and re-commitment to, quality basic education for all children in South Africa,” she said. The charterThere are many underlying factors behind the poor quality of education and educational outcomes.According to the SAHRC, these include: social and economic factors, such as poverty and low literacy levels and low levels of formal education in children’s families; insufficient levels of educational support at home; insufficient school infrastructure and basic services at schools such as water, sanitation and electricity; lack of learning resources and materials such as libraries, laboratories and text books; the cost of schooling; poorly trained teachers and teachers with insufficient subject knowledge; and lack of access to early childhood education, among others.The charter is an informational and advocacy tool that will help a wide range of stakeholders know their rights and responsibilities.The information in the charter provides an indication of what children, their parents and other caregivers may expect of the education system; an educational tool for parents and caregivers regarding the role they may be required to play so that children can enjoy their right to basic education; and a summative planning and monitoring tool for the departments of basic education regarding their respective obligations.It also includes a planning tool for institutions of higher learning and the national Department of Basic Education for their roles and responsibilities in relation to improving the quality of teachers, teaching and learning in the classroom, among other things.“Twenty years into the democratic dispensation we are still arguing about the norms and standards of education. Every child is entitled to a good education. We have spent time talking with little action as far as the child’s right to education is concerned,” said the SAHRC’s chairman, Lawrence Mushwana.The charter includes:The availability of education: basic education must be made available by the state to all children;The accessibility of education: education must be accessible to all children;Acceptable education: the curriculum, teachers, teaching methods, educational outcomes and teacher and  learner behaviour must be acceptable; and,Adaptable education: the education system must be inclusive, flexible and responsive to children’s different circumstances and learning needs.Mokate added: “The charter provides a benchmark of where we are in terms of fulfilling the right to a basic education and where we need to go to ensure that every child receives an education.”last_img read more

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Firefox Creator Says the Web is Dead Meat; Android Creator Disagrees

first_imgRelated Posts marshall kirkpatrick Joe Hewitt, one of the most important software developers in recent history, published a provocative and sad post on his personal blog today, predicting that unless the open and free Web gets someone to own and take responsibility for advancing it, it will inevitably fall into virtual obscurity in the dust of fast evolving platforms like iOS, Android and Windows. Chris White, one of the co-founders of Android, offers a compelling argument against Hewitt’s perspective, though.As one of the primary co-creators of Firefox, Hewitt single-handedly built the Facebook iPhone app. and when he left Facebook fed up with Apple’s approval process for apps, he announced that his next aim was to build tools for mobile HTML5 developers. Apparently that work has led to some frustrating experiences trying to support the open web. It’s not surprising, but it is pretty heartbreaking. It’s hard to imagine a decentralized platform like the web evolving to make as many things possible, as quickly and at scale, as the big centralized app platforms.“The Web has no one who can ensure that the platform acquires cutting edge capabilities in a timely manner (camera access, anyone?),” Hewitt writes. “The Web has no one to ensure that it is competitive with other platforms, and so increasingly we are seeing developers investing their time in other platforms that serve their needs better… I can easily see a world in which Web usage falls to insignificant levels compared to Android, iOS, and Windows, and becomes a footnote in history. That thing we used to use in the early days of the Internet.”Hewitt says standards bodies are debilitatingly slow, that Web-first evangelists are guilty of staggering arrogance that puts principles above relevance for users and developers and that apps just won’t run on the web in the future unless something changes dramatically.The web needs an owner, Hewitt argues. It needs a single code repository and a strong leader to push it forward.“Can’t believe I’m saying this, but 2 years later, I’m seriously considering developing for iOS (natively) again,” Hewitt Tweeted today. The Other Side of the Story So far it seems that most people are in dissapointed agreement with Hewitt. One who’s not is Portland, Oregon internet marketer Uriah Maynard. “Arguing for ‘an owner’ of the web is like winning the American revolution and then arguing that we need a king,” Maynard says in articulating a counter-position well. “No owners, no masters. That is a killer feature of the web, and the reason it will never die, even if it fades in popularity. What we need is to learn how to efficiently run truly democratic organizations.” Uriah’s in Portland and clearly needs to put a bird on it.Chris White, one of the co-founders of the Android OS, puts it a little bit differently. “The web is only interesting because it’s a standard,” White writes, on Google Plus. “As new experiences become commonplace, they get rolled into the one standard platform Microsoft, Google, Apple, Facebook, et al agree on. The cutting edge will always occur on proprietary platforms first. Asking for a private entity to control the web is like asking for a sovereign country to control the United Nations (or the world).“The web is suppose to be lowest common denominator. That’s what makes it work.”What do you think, readers? Do you think the future will be one where the open web is just a shadow of what it is today? That proprietary platforms will steal the world’s heart away? Or is this just how it goes? The innovation comes from the corporate world and then defuses?Personally, I don’t feel qualified to venture a guess on such a big question. But I’m going to read the conversation closely and keep an eye out for clues that indicate things are going one way or the other. I hope Joe Hewitt is wrong. I imagine that there’s a healthy dose of truth to all the perspectives above. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#web#Web 2.0 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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The Intelligence of Things: Streaming analytics comes to IoT

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Scott Zoldi There’s no doubt about it––the Internet of Things (IoT) is shaping up to be the mother of all technology trends in 2016. There are endless statistics on how many devices are or will be coming online; just within the home, everything from doorbells to refrigerators, to light bulbs has become internet-enabled. As IoT devices infiltrate many product ecosystems, they’re becoming more a part of our lives. But while these devices gather lots of data, they’re not very intelligent or self-aware in their own right. That can be a problem. We need the right intelligence and security onboard, in the devices, in order for them to become aware when they might be manipulated or failing.I call it the “Intelligence of Things,” and that’s when things will get really interesting for IoT. The power of self-learning analyticsSelf-learning streaming models based on continuous inputs are a mainstay of the financial world––in fighting payment card fraud, for example––and, increasingly, cybersecurity. As applied to IoT devices, self-learning models monitor their environment and gather data, and thus can make a determination if the behavior of a user or an environment they’re embedded in is normal or abnormal.Scott Zoldi, Chief Analytics Officer of FICOWith self-learning models on board, IoT devices can warn of an unsafe situation or an impending failure. Stoked by streaming analytics, the device will infer that something about its environment or itself is failing, and issue an appropriate warning.  Interestingly, IoT devices within the home can communicate with one another; in this way, the web of devices can build a larger consciousness of the house based on their collective inputs.IoT spotlight: air conditionersHere’s an example. In recent years, commercial air conditioning units have become targets for vandals, looking to strip the $80-$100 of copper contained therein. Some companies have taken to elaborate measures to protect their A/C units, ranging from lighting and security cameras to special alarms, to putting a GPS tracker on the unit. Outfitting the air conditioner with an IoT sensor would allow it to collect a constant stream information on many operational functions. Should a component begin to malfunction, the IoT device could trigger an alarm, notifying the facilities manager that maintenance is required. In this way, should the device be intruded upon by vandals, the IoT sensor would detect abnormal activity and trigger an appropriate alarm.Here’s another, even more, dramatic air conditioner example. In 2015, Formula 1 race car driven by Jenson Button and his wife were robbed in their villa in the south of France, reportedly after burglars pumped an anesthetic gas through the house’s air conditioning system. (Shockingly, this kind of attack does not seem to be uncommon in the region.) Again, an IoT sensor could have detected tampering with the unit, or air pressure changes as the anesthetic gas were introduced into the system, triggering an alarm. The alarm from the air conditioning unit, coupled to inputs from the villa’s IoT home monitoring system, could have alerted the owners (or a private security monitoring company) of suspicious activity.     On a more pedestrian level, even the lowly IoT doorbell could benefit from self-learning. Earlier this year hackers figured out how to compromise the Ring IoT doorbell, to extract the home WiFi network’s password. Putting more intelligence on-board in the device could have triggered an alert that the doorbell was being tampered with. This information could’ve been crossed-checked with the motion-triggered alerts that Ring already supplies.Drilling down on self-learningMoving from vanilla IoT to the “Intelligence of Things” requires a change in the mindset of these devices. Instead of just collecting data for apps, comparison to rules thresholds, or binary commands, they need to self-monitor their state in the environment. They must measure their own “self” which, for an IoT device, requires streaming behavioral analytics.“Behavioral analytics” has mixed meanings today. To most technical people the term typically refers to heuristics such as, “If X, Y, Z happen in that order, then action A will be taken.” These event chains, over time, have their place, but device self-awareness requires a unique understanding of individual environments; no two IoT devices are placed in exactly the same environment. In this sense, they are as unique as their owners’ and users’ behaviors.Real-time behavioral awareness is a fixture in certain domains such as payment card fraud detection. Here, a small (1,000-2,000 byte) entity profile of recursively updated feature detectors for fraud is maintained. These entity profiles have a small memory footprint, which allows two important things:Real-time updates in millisecondsHighly predictive analytic variables, monitoring normalcy vs. abnormality, can be applied in the stream of data.This same approach is well suited for IoT devices for which:It’s not feasible to store all sensor data onboardHaving an onboard entity profile that is updated with each and every sensor read is definitely feasible, and allows the device to perform sophisticated self-inspection. Determining outliers and appropriate actionsEach feature in this entity profile has a normal range of variation and can get very detailed, specifically, understanding which sensor data is interesting or relatively uninteresting. “Interesting” data would occur when a house’s inhabitants are away at school or work––or when they are in the home, depending on the IoT device and its application. Distributions of these “interesting” and “uninteresting” features, computed in real-time, allow for a determination of which ones would be in an outlier state, and how extreme. The outlier features then can be combined to produce a score that can be operationalized as to actions the device has authority to perform.Collectively, these techniques are well proven and have been utilized on smart devices for more than a decade to monitor components, detect utility network failures and signal infrastructure changes at a national level.Achieving the “Intelligence of Things”By leveraging the predictive power of self-learning analytics, IoT can facilitate exciting positive outcomes. “The Jetsons,” the 1960s cartoon TV show, has also been mentioned as a benchmark for the connected home. With the “Intelligence of Things” extending data-collecting IoT devices into an analytic fabric, we’re closer to a Jetsons future than ever. The author is Chief Analytics Officer of FICO, a leading analytics software company, helping businesses to make better decisions. Follow him on Twitter @ScottZoldi Related Posts Tags:#featured#FICO#Internet of Things#IoT#predictive analytics#Ring#top center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… Follow the Pucklast_img read more

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