Next generation of biotech food heading for grocery stores

first_imgHomeFeaturedNext generation of biotech food heading for grocery stores Nov. 15, 2018 at 4:59 amFeaturedNewsNext generation of biotech food heading for grocery storesAssociated Press3 years agoapbiotechfoodNews By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterThe next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart.By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA “edited” are expected to begin selling. It’s a different technology than today’s controversial “genetically modified” foods, more like faster breeding that promises to boost nutrition, spur crop growth, and make farm animals hardier and fruits and vegetables last longer.The U.S. National Academy of Sciences has declared gene editing one of the breakthroughs needed to improve food production so the world can feed billions more people amid a changing climate. Yet governments are wrestling with how to regulate this powerful new tool. And after years of confusion and rancor, will shoppers accept gene-edited foods or view them as GMOs in disguise?“If the consumer sees the benefit, I think they’ll embrace the products and worry less about the technology,” said Dan Voytas, a University of Minnesota professor and chief science officer for Calyxt Inc., which edited soybeans to make the oil heart-healthy.Researchers are pursuing more ambitious changes: Wheat with triple the usual fiber, or that’s low in gluten. Mushrooms that don’t brown, and better-producing tomatoes. Drought-tolerant corn, and rice that no longer absorbs soil pollution as it grows. Dairy cows that don’t need to undergo painful de-horning, and pigs immune to a dangerous virus that can sweep through herds.Scientists even hope gene editing eventually could save species from being wiped out by devastating diseases like citrus greening, a so far unstoppable infection that’s destroying Florida’s famed oranges.First they must find genes that could make a new generation of trees immune.“If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we’d have a way to defeat this disease,” said Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, as he examined diseased trees in a grove near Fort Meade.GENETICALLY MODIFIED OR EDITED, WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?Farmers have long genetically manipulated crops and animals by selectively breeding to get offspring with certain traits. It’s time-consuming and can bring trade-offs. Modern tomatoes, for example, are larger than their pea-sized wild ancestor, but the generations of cross-breeding made them more fragile and altered their nutrients.GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, are plants or animals that were mixed with another species’ DNA to introduce a specific trait — meaning they’re “transgenic.” Best known are corn and soybeans mixed with bacterial genes for built-in resistance to pests or weed killers.Despite international scientific consensus that GMOs are safe to eat, some people remain wary and there is concern they could spur herbicide-resistant weeds.Now gene-editing tools, with names like CRISPR and TALENs, promise to alter foods more precisely, and at less cost, without necessarily adding foreign DNA. Instead, they act like molecular scissors to alter the letters of an organism’s own genetic alphabet.The technology can insert new DNA, but most products in development so far switch off a gene, according to University of Missouri professor Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes.Those new Calyxt soybeans? Voytas’ team inactivated two genes so the beans produce oil with no heart-damaging trans fat and that shares the famed health profile of olive oil without its distinct taste.The hornless calves? Most dairy Holsteins grow horns that are removed for the safety of farmers and other cows. Recombinetics Inc. swapped part of the gene that makes dairy cows grow horns with the DNA instructions from naturally hornless Angus beef cattle.“Precision breeding,” is how animal geneticist Alison Van Eenennaam of the University of California, Davis, explains it. “This isn’t going to replace traditional breeding,” but make it easier to add one more trait.RULES AREN’T CLEARThe Agriculture Department says extra rules aren’t needed for “plants that could otherwise have been developed through traditional breeding,” clearing the way for development of about two dozen gene-edited crops so far.In contrast, the Food and Drug Administration in 2017 proposed tighter, drug-like restrictions on gene-edited animals. It promises guidance sometime next year on exactly how it will proceed.Because of trade, international regulations are “the most important factor in whether genome editing technologies are commercialized,” USDA’s Paul Spencer told a meeting of agriculture economists.Europe’s highest court ruled last summer that existing European curbs on the sale of transgenic GMOs should apply to gene-edited foods, too.But at the World Trade Organization this month, the U.S. joined 12 nations including Australia, Canada, Argentina and Brazil in urging other countries to adopt internationally consistent, science-based rules for gene-edited agriculture.ARE THESE FOODS SAFE?The biggest concern is what are called off-target edits, unintended changes to DNA that could affect a crop’s nutritional value or an animal’s health, said Jennifer Kuzma of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University.Scientists are looking for any signs of problems. Take the hornless calves munching in a UC-Davis field. One is female and once it begins producing milk, Van Eenennaam will test how similar that milk’s fat and protein composition is to milk from unaltered cows.“We’re kind of being overly cautious,” she said, noting that if eating beef from naturally hornless Angus cattle is fine, milk from edited Holsteins should be, too.But to Kuzma, companies will have to be up-front about how these new foods were made and the evidence that they’re healthy. She wants regulators to decide case-by-case which changes are no big deal, and which might need more scrutiny.“Most gene-edited plants and animals are probably going to be just fine to eat. But you’re only going to do yourself a disservice in the long run if you hide behind the terminology,” Kuzma said.AVOIDING A BACKLASHUncertainty about regulatory and consumer reaction is creating some strange bedfellows. An industry-backed group of food makers and farmers asked university researchers and consumer advocates to help craft guidelines for “responsible use” of gene editing in the food supply.“Clearly this coalition is in existence because of some of the battle scars from the GMO debates, there’s no question about that,” said Greg Jaffe of the food-safety watchdog Center for Science in the Public Interest, who agreed to join the Center for Food Integrity’s guidelines group. “There’s clearly going to be questions raised about this technology.”SUSTAINABILITY OR HYPE?Gene-editing can’t do everything, cautioned Calyxt’s Voytas. There are limitations to how much foods could be changed. Sure, scientists made wheat containing less gluten, but it’s unlikely to ever be totally gluten-free for people who can’t digest that protein, for example — or to make, say, allergy-free peanuts.Nor is it clear how easily companies will be able to edit different kinds of food, key to their profit.Despite her concerns about adequate regulation, Kuzma expects about 20 gene-edited crops to hit the U.S. market over five years — and she notes that scientists also are exploring changes to crops, like cassava, that are important in the poorest countries.“We think it’s going to really revolutionize the industry,” she said.Tags :apbiotechfoodNewsshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentDowntown Santa Monica McDonald’s will close at night to prevent crimeRecipe: This elegant nut tart is surprisingly easy to prepareYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall9 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson20 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter20 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor20 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press20 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press20 hours agolast_img read more

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The ‘Oh s—‘ factor: Meet Matthew Wolff

first_imgSTILLWATER, Okla. – The kid with the funky swing was leading a Ventura County junior event – again – and the local head pro finally decided to intervene. It wasn’t enough that Matthew Wolff’s strikes were as pure as gold, his range sessions appointment viewing. But he was whipping all of the Tour wannabes with their perfect, factory-built swings, and that didn’t compute, so the pro cautioned Wolff that this form, with that action, was temporary. “He said that he wanted to give lessons to me, because he said that he could ‘fix me,’” Wolff recalls. “He said my swing wouldn’t last.” Then he sighed, clearly still miffed. “That’s been a common theme.” His doubters have gone awfully quiet now.   The Oklahoma State sophomore has exploded into one of the most fascinating and exciting prospects in golf, responding to every so-called swing guru with the ultimate rebuttal: Low scores.  Awards.  Trophies.  To thrive in this era of Internet trolling, Wolff has needed a refreshing, new-school coach and skin thicker than Kevlar, but there’s a hint of satisfaction in his voice as he recounts some of his past skeptics.  “To be able to prove them all wrong,” he says, “motivates me just a little bit more.” Not since Rickie Fowler has a 19-year-old possessed such appealing attributes: the eye-catching swing and monster game, the unmistakable swagger and dynamic personality.  Wolff has become the face of college golf.  And maybe soon the pro game, too. “He brings so much to the table,” says his swing coach, George Gankas, “and you can tell in his charisma, the way he hits the ball, the way he carries himself. If he plays like I know he can play, like, oh s—, he’s going to be such a huge disruptor.”  Your browser does not support iframes. AT THE TOP OF HIS BACKSWING, Wolff is up on his left toe, and his club is across the line, like a slugger sitting on a 95-mph fastball. Indeed, it’s a move borrowed from his brief baseball career, when he was a standout shortstop who played on a 12-and-under travel team that wound up competing for a national title in Cooperstown, N.Y. (Wolff even pitched the final innings.) But the team-first ethos on the diamond never quite jibed with Wolff’s makeup. “He’s very sensitive,” says his mother, Shari. “When he’d mess up, he felt really bad letting the team down. He’d rather be in charge and be the dictator of his own performance.” That pushed Wolff even further toward golf, where the same athleticism that made him a stud leadoff hitter, shooting guard and quarterback allowed him to create ridiculous clubhead speed and power. Self-taught, he experienced near-immediate success at the junior level, so he didn’t bother tinkering.  “If I never saw what my swing looked like,” he says, “I’d think that I swung it straight back and straight through.” Shari’s job as an office manager and bookkeeper didn’t provide Wolff the opportunity to join the ritzy private clubs in the area, so he played when and where he could, bouncing around the public tracks near the family’s home in Agoura Hills, California, about 45 minutes northwest of Los Angeles. “He always had trouble having a place to go,” Shari says. “I felt really bad about it, but we didn’t have the money. He’s had to fight for everything he’s got.” To compete nationally, Wolff dipped into the college fund that his grandmother set aside for him each year. Playing the AJGA circuit was expensive, so he traveled as frugally as possible: booking multi-stop flights, taking Uber to the course, sharing rooms with other competitors. If not more glamorous, high school golf at least offered some structure. Westlake Golf Club became the home base for the team, and it was there that Wolff first began seeing Gankas, the tech-savvy coach who in recent years has become a swing whisperer to the stars.  Gankas, 47, oozes SoCal chill in a flat-bill cap and flip-flops, but out of Westlake he ran the No. 1 junior program in the country. After school, kids battled to swing the fastest, smash drives the farthest and play best-of-five series at sharpshooting targets. Perhaps it was no surprise that Wolff’s Westlake teams became the first in the state to win back-to-back titles.  Still, Westlake is an unusual starting point for a revolution. It’s a modest, par-67 layout, with bumpy greens, a limited short-game area and a turf-mat range. A fence borders the property 310 yards away, and Wolff and another high school teammate routinely sailed drives onto the busy 101 Freeway. “I’d have to tell him, ‘Dude, you’re going to kill somebody,’” Gankas says. “The cops would come over and ask: ‘Who is hitting driver?’” After enough calls, Wolff – one of the top-ranked talents in the country – was forced to practice with limited-flight balls. Even though his peers marveled at his shot quality, Wolff desperately searched for validation. The head pro’s stinging criticism years earlier lingered and left him questioning his direction. “He always wanted to know what people thought of him,” says former Westlake teammate Spencer Soosman, who now plays at Texas. “He didn’t know how good he was.” But Wolff found a perfect match in Gankas, who was secure enough not to overhaul a natural swing that had proven successful. “I loved it when I first saw it,” Gankas says. “I was like, ‘This is sick.’ I thought for three weeks about changing some of those things, but then I said, ‘F— it, I’m not changing this kid.’” Your browser does not support iframes. EVEN CASUAL GOLF FANS don’t need the Konica Minolta Biz Hub Swing Vision Camera to discern that Wolff’s action is different than most. He starts by bumping into his left leg and shimmying – a swing trigger that began after he broke his collarbone in 2015, as a reminder to open his shoulders and hips before impact. Then he takes the club back vertically.  Then he gets to the top, makes a full turn and crosses the club across the line, with a high right elbow. Then uses his pivot to slot the club on the downswing. And finally he opens up, hard, using the ground for power and nearly jumping out of his size-10 1/2 spikes. “It’s basically a more athletic motion,” Gankas says. “We’re not putting him in positions and trying to make it perfect, like a math equation, or try to make him like a machine. He’s not a machine. He’s an athlete.” Wolff’s revolutionary swing produces a distinct thwack at impact and mind-blowing results on TrackMan: swing speed as high as 134 mph, ball speed that tops 190, drives that sail 350 yards. Throughout the swing his left foot comes off the ground and then replants – a move similar to what you’d find on the World Long Drive circuit. A biomechanist from Cal State Fullerton recently found that Wolff generated the most vertical force of any player ever measured on his Swing Catalyst; he digs into the turf so hard, and generates so much torque, that he literally rips up the grass underneath him. “It all works as one,” Wolff says. “I think a lot of people get really mechanical and feel like they have to be in certain places in their swings. For me, it’s more of a natural movement. I don’t really think of things when I swing. I just swing.” It’s not all uncontrolled power, either. Wolff hit 80 percent of his fairways last fall, with a 300-plus average. “For distance combined with accuracy, I don’t know how you could be better, really,” Oklahoma State coach Alan Bratton says. “It’s like walking around with a video game. You just tell him where to go and he does it.” It was Wolff and a few of his high school teammates who persuaded Gankas to start his Instagram account (@georgegankasgolf), which now boasts more than 110,000 followers. At first, Gankas used the site to post dozens of trophy shots of his students, like a proud papa, but as his popularity exploded he began to include slow-motion swing videos. Naturally, Wolff’s was the most unorthodox, and the various backswing positions were so unusual – at least compared to the cookie-cutter swings on the junior tours – that he became a lightning rod for criticism. “He eventually just said, ‘I can’t look at the comments anymore. It’s too hard,’” Shari Wolff says. “Especially when you’re younger, you don’t want to hear people criticize you. But once it was proven over and over and over again, he thought to himself, ‘Hmm, I must be doing something right.’ There’s a level of logic that feeds into it: ‘It can’t be that bad if I’m so good.’” So good, in fact, that Wolff reached the finals of both the U.S. Junior and AJGA Polo, and dominated the local Toyota Tour Cup series, gaining a fervent following on YouTube and social media. In late 2014, Bratton was hosting a potential recruit for lunch at Karsten Creek when the junior began talking about a tournament he’d just played in Southern California. He casually mentioned that the winner there had shot a course-record 61 in the final round, blowing away the field by 13. “Oh, really?” Bratton said, inching forward in his seat. “What was his name?” Within a few weeks, Bratton sent then-assistant Brian Guetz on a scouting mission.  After watching Wolff for a few swings, Guetz texted his boss: “Wait until you see this. You’re going to love it.” Your browser does not support iframes. AFTER INITIALLY COMMITTING TO stay close to home at Southern Cal, Wolff instead switched to Oklahoma State, the most storied program in men’s college golf. More than the allure of championships, OSU offered something that Wolff had longed for growing up – a world-class training facility. Karsten Creek Golf Club is essentially the team’s personal playground, with a dedicated staff equipped to handle all of their needs, from chefs and physiotherapists to an impeccable practice area and a punishing, Tom Fazio-designed course that recently hosted the NCAA Championships. “He finally became a country-club kid,” Shari Wolff says. “He has everything you’d ever need to be successful.” To his teammates, at least, Wolff’s swing is the least interesting thing about him.  At a business-like program that cranks out Tour types and demands discipline – players must shave on the road and own a 3.0 GPA to play the tournament in Hawaii – Wolff is unapologetically himself: extroverted and demonstrative, oozing jock swagger. After a recent interview, he shadowboxed the team’s sports information director, initiated conversations with, “What up, G?”, howled at a hilarious Instagram post, described a solid strike as “Purina” and pinned his assistant coach against the wall, as if scrapping for a puck along the boards. “He has this magnetic personality that people gravitate toward,” Shari Wolff says. “He pulls you into his universe, and you kinda want to be there.” Last fall, Wolff began to tire of the sheltered, 24/7 nature of elite college golf. A member of the OSU team hasn’t been a part of Greek life in two decades, but Wolff convinced Bratton that him and roommate Austin Eckroat should be allowed to join Phi Gamma Delta. As honorary members, they skipped the usual pledge activities, and they’re now officially frat boys, partaking in events like The Islander – where they rent out a sand lot by the lake, light tiki torches and blast country music to bring the “beach” to the heartland – and hooping in the annual rivalry game/fundraiser against Sigma Nu. “His golf swing explains his personality,” Eckroat says. “He’s just different from everybody else.” Your browser does not support iframes. THOSE WHO HADN’T FOLLOWED Gankas’ Instagram account finally got their first look at Wolff in May.   It’d already been a banner year before the NCAA Championship – four runners-up, first-team All-American, Phil Mickelson Award winner as the nation’s top freshman – but the six days in Stillwater were Wolff’s coming-out party in front of a national TV audience. The breathtaking speed, the titanium-denting power, the flair for the dramatic – they were all on display at Karsten Creek, as Wolff powered Oklahoma State in stroke play and then went 2-1 in match play as the Cowboys captured their 11th NCAA title (and first since 2006).  It takes three points for a team to win the championship, but it’s Wolff’s match that will be immortalized. Against Alabama’s Davis Riley, Wolff put on a near-flawless driving display, knocked down flags and rolled in clutch putts, none bigger than the national-title clincher in front of roughly 2,000 orange-clad fans.  That star-making performance didn’t surprise Soosman, Wolff’s old Westlake teammate: “He enjoys having all eyes on him, being the center of the show – that’s kind of who he is.” “If that’s the first impression that the world got of him,” Bratton says, “that’s a great start.” A wrist injury derailed his summer plans, but Wolff has been better than ever over the past two months. Winless since his sophomore year of high school, he has gone on a tear this fall, earning medalist honors at his first three tournaments while playing one of the country’s most difficult schedules. No longer does he have to wonder about his place in the college golf hierarchy; he’s ranked No. 1. “His upside, I don’t think you can put a limit on it,” OSU assistant Donnie Darr says. “There’s not a weakness in his game.” In fact, Wolff has been such a smashing success that, now, others are starting to copy him. Wolff’s swing is a frequent talking point during Gankas’ $350-an-hour lessons at Westlake, and one of his students, Web.com Tour player Johnny Ruiz, recently adopted Wolff’s action. Another Gankas disciple is trying to crack the Challenge Tour in Europe but recently became so demoralized after watching a Wolff stripe show that he pondered retirement. “It’s so stupid when people say it’s not going to last, or that it’s a terrible swing,” Soosman says. “It’s what’s normal to him. It’s going to last. It already has.” Your browser does not support iframes. WOLFF’S CULT-HERO FOLLOWING has created an interesting dynamic, as he’s the rare college golfer with at least some semblance of Internet fame. Up-and-coming talents used to toil away in anonymity, accumulating experience, but with Wolff’s high profile, each start is dissected and projected. It’s pro training, a few years early. The feverish activity that surrounds Wolff reminds Bratton of another former Oklahoma State legend, and the parallels with Fowler – a Southern California kid with a unique swing who bonded, trusted and emboldened his instructor – are interesting to consider. “He had an exciting style of golf,” says Bratton, who was an assistant coach for the two years that Fowler played for the Cowboys. “When I was recruiting him, I had a plan to go watch other people, but I couldn’t stop watching Rickie. Matt had a similar trait. It’s fun to watch him play. He does things that other guys can’t do.” Fowler returns to Stillwater a few times a year for various events, and in the spring he hosted the team at his house in South Florida. Wolff said they immediately hit it off. “I feel like me more than most people have a connection to him,” he says. “Everything you see with him, I have an ability to do, and it really motivates me and drives me. I want to be in his shoes someday.” It remains to be seen whether Wolff will possess the same mass appeal, but Bratton can’t think of a better role model for him – a fan favorite who plays a flashy brand of golf all his own, who interacts easily with everyone from CEOs to young fans, who hasn’t let the unrelenting grind of Tour life dull his enthusiasm for the sport.  “Our counsel for Matt will be, like Rickie, to continue to look like the same little kid as when you started,” Bratton says. “Don’t let the world make this so important that it’s not fun anymore, because that’s what’s going to draw people to him – the joy that he plays the game with and the style of play that he has. It’s exciting. It’s fun. He makes a lot of birdies and does it looking like he’s enjoying himself, and not everyone does that.  “I think golf fans are going to love him.” Yeah, it’s all love now, which is funny to those who have grown up watching Wolff play, who have seen the torrent of social-media criticism, who have heard the other parents, players and professionals dismiss him. Because they already know – all it usually takes is one swing, one round, one tournament to become a believer. To recognize that Wolff has the goods. “They’ve talked s— for six years,” Gankas says, “but then once they see him hit the ball, it’s all good and he’s the greatest and they say it’s one of the purest moves on the planet.  “I know for a fact that he’s going to change the world of golf. People are going to lose their minds.”last_img read more

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Mexico Combats Police Corruption with Mortgages

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhat are the benefits of sub-prime mortgages on the culture of bribery south of the border? Give the Mexican police force access to home mortgages to help fight widespread corruption in its ranks. So goes the thinking of a new pilot program designed to “keep them out of the pockets of organized crime”. Officers and prison guards in Michoacan state can now benefit from special deals to finance new home ownership. (Associated Press via Yahoo News) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

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Emotional Healing: Resiliency In The Midst Of Crisis

first_imgBy Dr. Ted WiardGolden Willow RetreatEditors Note: This is part of a series of columns by grief specialist Dr. Ted Wiard, dedicated to helping educate the community about emotional healing.The focus of this series of columns has been on grief, which is the process of redefining one’s self after loss into their new situation and definition of who that person is now.As COVID-19 has become the focus around the world, this column is an attempt to give emotional support for individuals, families and communities during this time of radical change, to everybody, in some way.Shopping, socializing, communicating, family dynamics, school, work, religious gatherings, financial behaviors and a perception of safety (just to name some of the many changes), have all radically changed everyday living and functioning.This is grief and everybody in the world is in a grief process independently, familiarly and as a worldly collective.Part of our brain wants instant gratification, and as that is not happening, it is causing a magnified level of most emotions. This is a normal process as emotions arise radically when the normalcy of a person’s everyday life has been disrupted. Historical emotional experiences as well as present emotions, collide and increase the magnitude of emotional distress.As months pass and this pandemic continues, resiliency becomes more prominent. Resiliency is the ability to adapt in times of emotionally escalated change, to rebuild a foundation, to bring a new norm back into one’s life.Resiliency does not mean avoiding the experience of emotional distress, but how to navigate behaviors, thoughts and actions during and after a change in life.The skill of navigating difficult times is something that has been taught throughout your history in life from family dynamics, religious/spiritual beliefs and habitual ways of dealing with change, cultural influences, and many more life-long factors. Like any other skill, everyone can always improve skills by being resilient. I think of sustaining a level of emotional balance is similar to a marathon with no clear finish line.In order to survive and grow within that marathon takes many supports, from leaders and leadership, nutrition, self-monitoring, realigning plans as circumstances change, collaborating, resting and working, all while being aware of how the environment can help support thru the entirety of the marathon. Having only one support will make it almost impossible to finish the race. Having many supports is what allows success, growth and community.When there is a radical change, most people will first retract and isolate, as time goes forward and the need to sustain the change becomes a longer period of time, the need for self-care increases. Resource multiple supports so as new changes happen, the supports can hold up against the pressure, as the person is not dependent only on one certain support. I picture this as a pier, which has many pillars or girders to give structure that can sustain the storms and pressures, and if there were only one pillar, that platform would not hold up.Finding supports that allow a person to help sustain a long-term and adaptable foundation is imperative during challenging times. Remembering that supports are not only people, but also include a path of multiple types of emotional supports, emotionally, intellectually, spiritually and physically that can allow you to be resilient in the midst of an emotional marathon, as well as build a stronger internal resilient emotional foundation. Until the next article, take care and be well.Golden Willow Retreat is a nonprofit organization focused on emotional healing and recovery from any type of loss. Direct any questions to Dr. Ted Wiard, EdD, LPCC, CGC, founder of Golden Willow Retreat at [email protected] or call 575.776.2024.last_img read more

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Hansteen enjoys Brexit bounce after pound falls against the euro

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Other Sports WADA Criticism On Russia Sanctions For Doping Mounts, US Olympic Committee Rebukes Decision

first_imgLausanne: Criticism of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s sanctions against Russia mushroomed with a rebuke from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee coming on the heels of the outraged resignation of a member of the WADA athlete committee. The USOPC and British Paralympian Victoria Aggar each expressed their disagreement with WADA’s decision not to issue a blanket ban on the Russians in wake of evidence that government officials doctored data that was supposed to be used to prosecute cases stemming from the country’s long-running doping scandal.Aggar, a Paralympic rower, announced her resignation from WADA’s athlete committee, saying “I simply can no longer be part of an organization that places politics over principle.” Hours later at its quarterly meeting, the USOPC board debated the wisdom of sanctions that called for innocent athletes to be able to compete as neutrals at next year’s Olympics, even though determining who really is innocent has been made more difficult because of the data manipulation.”It’s very difficult for us to see how justice can be served and how there will be a true deterrent versus future corruption if any of the athletes from Russia have a right to compete in Tokyo under any flag, neutral or otherwise,” USOPC chair Susanne Lyons said. “If the data truly has been corrupted … it’s very unclear how you can decide and siphon out who’s been part of the doping and who has not.”Earlier in the week, the chair of the British Olympic Association called for “the fullest possible sanctions to be taken against Russia at Tokyo 2020.” It was the same stance that a majority of the WADA athlete committee took last weekend, before WADA executives met to rubber-stamp the recommendation that would allow Russians to compete as neutrals. The decision forced Aggar’s hand, and led her to release a statement saying WADA’s actions “have fundamentally shaken my belief in an organization that I felt initially served a great purpose in protecting the integrity of sports.”Also Read | Russia Banned For Four Years By WADA, To Not Be Part Of 2020 Tokyo OlympicsThe USOPC’s Athletes Advisory Council was among those supporting Aggar. “WADA’s decision to ignore the majority of its own Athlete Committee … is out of touch and the current sanctions will not be enough to cause significant change in Russia,” the AAC said in a statement. In an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday, WADA compliance chairman Jonathan Taylor said disallowing the Russian flag and its Olympic officials from the Tokyo Games, but not barring all its athletes, “was the appropriate line to draw.” For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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How Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury are best of frenemies… from scathing insults to prank calls and emotional messages

first_imgTYSON FURY and Anthony Joshua are going to be the absolute best of enemies now their two-fight deal has been ‘confirmed’.Ten action-packed years on from their first ever meeting, when the Gypsy King travelled to London for some hard sparring rounds before beating Derek Chisora, the pair have agreed 50-50 financial terms for a couple of showdowns.Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury have developed a unique relationship as the best of frenemiesFury admitted AJ got the better of him in sparring a decade ago but changed his story to suggest the Watford man was batteredCredit: News Group Newspapers LtdIn 2010, when 6ft 9in Fury was a rising pro and AJ was a promising but raw amateur, just two years into his training, Fury gushed about his new training partner.The 31-year-old undefeated WBC king said: “I tell you what, he’s very, very, very good.“Watch out for that name, Anthony Joshua, he’s one prospect for the future.“I rate myself as one of the top heavyweights in the world – he came at me for three rounds and he gave me a beating. I’m not going to deny it.“I don’t mind telling anyone that he beat me up in sparring.”Plenty has changed in the decade that has followed.AJ has collected almost as many gold medals and world titles as insults from Fury.In the words of the Gypsy King, the Watford 30-year-old has been labelled a bum, a dosser, a big stiff idiot, a one-dimensional bodybuilder and, to this day, promoter Eddie Hearn’s plump but simple cash cow.The intervening years have, in Fury’s unmistakable words, morphed that sparring session into a three-round walloping AJ barely survived.Still, in the warped way only boxers can, the pair remain bonded by a bizarre and bloody brotherhood.Fury will regularly FaceTime the WBA, IBF and WBO boss on his battered iPhone 7 and playfully promise to batter him when they finally meet.He’ll end the call by wishing his rival and his family good health – and mean it. One such call happened on the Fury family’s recent reality series.A similar instance came following AJ’s shock first pro defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr last year.Just three days after branding his fellow Brit a “p****, s***house bum dosser”, Fury sent a classy tweet which read: “We have our back and Forth’s [sic] but @anthonyfjoshua changed his stars through life.“Heavyweight boxing, these things happen, rest up, recover, regroup and come again.”It all seems like a game to Fury while deep-thinking Joshua struggles to understand the waves of praise and criticism that come in equal measure.Most recently, when asked about his relationship with his nemesis, he said: “You never know what you’re going to get with him.“He’s either at the top of the world, conquering the world, or at the bottom of the ocean and he needs to find a balance.”If we ever get to the opening press conference it will be intriguing to see which Fury arrives.Will it be Prince Charming aiming to disarm his foe, playing possum for the camera?Or will the acid-tongued mindgames master drag up AJ’s past mistakes in and outside the ring in an attempt to unsettle his vast mainstream appeal and empire?So many things stand in the way of us ever finding out.But fight fans would probably spend another decade in lockdown misery to guarantee we finally see these two titans clash and settle it once and for all.Joshua never quite knows which Fury he will be in touch with – the chief insulter or cheery palCredit: AFP or licensorsFury sometimes will randomly FaceTime his heavyweight rival and wish his family well – and mean it, tooTyson Fury confirms Anthony Joshua fight deal is agreed and vows to ‘annihilate’ him after he ‘smashes Wilder’s face in’ 10 INCREDIBLE Space Launch Failures! Travel Diary // Vietnam 2017 Rebekah Vardy scores an impressive penalty in six-inch heels People Slammed By Massive Waves 4 What’s This “Trick” Called? Comment Down Below!!center_img Top 5 Best Budget Hotels In Dubai under AED 400 a night. 8 MOST DANGEROUS RAINS of All Time | TOP 10 INTERESTING Real or Fake? Shark Attacks Helicopter Source: Boxing – thesun.co.uklast_img read more

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Jose Mourinho has no problems taking over at Real Madrid immediately – but these…

first_imgAdvertisement uNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsqoprWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E8550s( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 8xcWould you ever consider trying this?😱t0Can your students do this? 🌚1qtxRoller skating! Powered by Firework After losing to Liverpool 3-1 at Anfield, Manchester United sacked then manager Jose Mourinho on 18 December 2018.Advertisement Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, former club legend was appointed as the new interim manager and has since gone on to win 5 matches as his first term as a United manager.Advertisement However, people are speculating as to where Mourinho might head next and rumours are in the air saying that he might rejoin Real Madrid.A tweet from Francesc Aguilar of Mundo Deportivo – a Spanish newspaper, hints that the Special One ‘has no problems in taking charge of the team now’ but he has made certain demands.Advertisement The tweet which is in Spanish roughly translates to:“José Mourinho, who has just put Benfica out, has told Florentino Pérez that if it is for him, he has no problems in taking charge of the team now. Of course, he asks for reinforcements, especially in the center of defense and a contrasted goalscorer.”This suggests that the Portuguese coach after turning down a Benfica approach has agreed to rejoin Real Madrid as head coach if he is given the choice of reinforcing the team in areas of defence and attack. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Mayor of Galway to visit Black Dragon Kickboxing Club

first_imgThe Mayor of Galway, Councillor Frank Fahy, will pay a visit to one of the City’s most successful sporting clubs, the Galway Black Dragon Kickboxing Club, on Wednesday evening to honour several of the athletes there who took an amazing tally of 5 Gold medals, 4 Silver medals & 2 bronze medals at the Unified World Championships in Benidorm last November.The Unified World Championships is the largest Martial Arts tournament on the planet and attracts thousands of top class competitors from some 120 countries over 5 continents.Mayor Fahy will present the following athletes with a Certificate of Honour on behalf of The City of Galway.Cian Mc Cormack from Kinvara, James Kelly from Athenry, Saoirse Joyce from Knocknacarra, Wesley Ward from Rahoon, Catherine Jennings from Riverside and Paul Huish from Knocknacarra who all represented their city & country at the highest level to reach the pinnacle of their sport.Indeed The Black Dragon Kickboxing club celebrates its 20 year anniversary this coming March as its been two fantastic decades since founder Pete Foley introduced the sport of Kickboxing to the City of the Tribes in March 1996 and they will mark the occasion on March 19 in the Clayton Hotel Galway, when one of its top fighters Paul Huish, the current European Champion, will take on Dutch fighter Dwane Panka from the Renowned Mejiro Gym in Amsterdam for the vacant World Lightweight  K-1 Title.This will be the main event on a top class fight card and tickets will be out soon.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

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