Tata Trusts upgrading government hospitals in Maharashtra, UP

first_img Related Posts By EH News Bureau on May 14, 2020 Read Article MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Tata Trusts upgrading government hospitals in Maharashtra, UP Each hospital will be armed with critical care capabilities, minor operation theatres, basic pathology, radiology, facilities for dialysis, blood storage and telemedicine unitsTata Trusts is upgrading four government hospital buildings, two in Uttar Pradesh and two in Maharashtra, into COVID-19 treatment centres. The facilities, including both in-patient and out-patient wings, are permanent and will enduringly enhance healthcare in their locations, even after the immediate purpose is met.The Trusts’ intervention follows the Ratan N Tata, Chairman, Tata Trusts statement that “Urgent emergency resources need to be deployed to cope with the needs of fighting the COVID-19 crisis, which is one of the toughest challenges the human race will face.”In Maharashtra, the hospitals are at Sangli (50 beds) and Buldhana (106 beds), and in Uttar Pradesh at Gautam Buddha Nagar (168 beds) and Gonda (106 beds). The treatment centres in Uttar Pradesh are in collaboration with a partner organisation. The decision to upgrade existing infrastructure was to bring speed and make use, wherever possible, of existing capabilities and services. The Trusts are attempting to hand over the facilities by June 15, 2020.Each hospital will be armed with critical care capabilities, minor operation theatres, basic pathology and radiology, facilities for dialysis and blood storage and telemedicine units.Tata Trusts is harnessing its experience in establishing cancer care facilities and connected service providers to modernise these hospitals. The construction is being done by Tata Projects, the design is by Edifice Consultants, and equipment are being sourced from leading manufacturers. This is the third such intervention of the Trusts to support India in its COVID-19 response.The Trusts have already begun donating to State Governments and individual hospitals personal protection equipment, including coveralls, N95 / KN95 masks, surgical masks, gloves and goggles. Thus far, PPE supplies have gone out to about 26 states and Union Territories.The Trusts have also done a pan-India community outreach to induce adoption of health practices, as promoted by the Government of India, in rural areas to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Beginning March 31, the exercise is expected to have already reached about 21 million people in 21 states. For wider deployment by any interested organisation, the Trusts have made publicly available through social media about 300 such videos and audio messages, in different languages, and dialects like Dongri, Kumaoni, Ladakhi, Garhwali, Santhali, Mundari, Kutchi (Gujarat) and Koborok (Tripura). All of them are available in the playlist here . The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Share Comments (0) COVID-19Government hospitalMaharashtraTata TrustsUttar Pradesh WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 News Add Commentlast_img read more

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Web of care

first_imgLake Peligre fills the valley floor, its dark blue waters a relief to the eye after hours winding through central Haiti’s hot, treeless hills on the dusty, potholed road that passes for National Route 3. Fishermen in traditional dugout canoes paddle across the lake’s surface, a placid scene viewed from Route 3’s perch high on one side of the valley’s steep walls. The lake is screened from the road by a row of tiny, two-room shacks, their occupants sitting outside, watching as passing traffic dodges pedestrians, dogs, and livestock. Peaceful today, the lake’s look is deceiving. Its creation in the 1950s led to decades of misery for the farming families that once made their living on the valley floor. But it has also led to a revolution in health care for the world’s poor in places as far flung as Peruvian shantytowns, remote Lesotho mountain communities, and Russian prison cells. Threads connect these far-flung places to an Episcopal priest who saw his church drowned along with his flock’s farms and to an idealistic Harvard Medical School student who stumbled onto the displaced farmers’ shacks in the nearby hills at a place called Cange. They lead in a broadening web to other idealistic students, to professors and global bureaucrats. They lead to the halls of power, to the World Health Organization, to Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, and to a rapidly globalizing nonprofit called Partners In Health. The threads eventually lead back to the poor, lying today in clinics in some of the world’s most inaccessible places, where a bedside physician wields a thermometer or stethoscope or syringe, or just kneels and watches. The Episcopal priest is Father Fritz Lafontant, today in his 80s and happy to tell the story of how in 1983 he met an idealistic student named Paul Farmer, who in turn met two other young idealists named Jim Yong Kim and Ophelia Dahl. Together, they began work among the Haitian poor that today has the world sitting up and taking notice. Farmer is the Maude and Lillian Presley Professor of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Kim is professor of social medicine at HMS and Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). Dahl is the president of Partners In Health (PIH). The organization, a private nonprofit, attests to its close ties to Harvard, listing as its “partners” Harvard Medical School’s Department of Social Medicine, the Harvard School of Public Health’s Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, and the Division of Social Medicine and Health Inequalities at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Its partners also include affiliated organizations and ministries of health in countries where it operates: Haiti, Peru, Lesotho, Rwanda, Malawi, Russia, the United States, Guatemala, and Mexico. In addition, whether as patients, community health workers, nurses, drivers, technicians, doctors, or top Partners In Health administrators, the people of those nations are active participants in improving their homelands’ health situation. Fernet Leandre, director of HIV and TB for Partners In Health’s Haitian partner organization, Zanmi Lasante, worked at government-run clinics in his Haitian homeland as a social service resident before coming to Zanmi Lasante in 1996. During that time, which he called “deeply painful,” he was routinely frustrated by a lack of the drugs and equipment needed to help patients. At Zanmi Lasante, he said, he has the tools to do his job. “I couldn’t really provide any care,” Leandre said. “When I came to Cange, it was exactly what I was waiting for. It was like a dream come true for a young physician like me.” When Farmer first arrived at Cange in 1983 he found an impoverished community with no health facility. People lived in extreme poverty and suffered from a variety of ailments. They had little food and no clean water. “The families here were in terrible, terrible shape. The land was no good, they had no houses, no water,” Lafontant said. In the years since, the hospital at Cange has become a major medical center whose effectiveness and story of transformation prompted one prominent international health official to say that for an infectious disease doctor, a visit to Cange is similar to that of a pilgrim to a sacred site. On arrival at Cange, after hours traversing rutted, potholed dirt roads, one pulls through high green gates into a lower dirt parking lot and a welcoming sign: “Bienvenue au Complex Socio-Educatif de Cange.” The main buildings are above you and away to the left, wrapping around the small, steep hill on which the campus sits. Though a warehouse and a school border the parking lot, most of the buildings, including the main hospital, are hidden by the terrain and the thick trees that cover the site. One of Farmer’s – and Partners In Health’s – beliefs is that creating a beautiful, restful place is as important for the sick poor as it is for the sick rich. Everywhere Partners In Health establishes itself, tree plantings and flower beds follow. David Walton, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, infectious disease specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and longtime physician with Partners In Health, said creating a beautiful campus requires some effort, though not much cost. Expending the effort shows respect for their patients and gives them dignity despite the poverty in which many live their daily lives. The result is that Cange seems to the first-time visitor as much botanical garden as hospital. The towering trees are particularly noticeable, given the deforested hillsides one has to traverse along Route 3 to get there. If one climbs the fieldstone-walled road winding up the hillside, one quickly arrives at a small pond full of colorful fish. The spot, shaded by the trees overhead, is peaceful and a common resting place for newly arrived patients nervously waiting to see the doctor. The hospital itself provides a full range of services, with operating rooms, an emergency room, separate maternity and tuberculosis wards, and dental and eye clinics. It serves as the referral hospital for a network of nine health clinics run in partnership with the Haiti government that reach across Haiti’s Central Department, one of the poorest regions of one of the world’s poorest countries. It also serves as the flagship for Partners In Health’s operations around the world, a hopeful example of the changes that 20 years of unwavering commitment and toil can bring. Joia Mukherjee, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health’s medical director, said she once brought a group of residents from Brigham and Women’s Hospital to the area. The group walked six hours to visit a community that had never been served by doctors. They saw the starvation and extreme poverty in which the local people lived and wound up vaccinating 300 and seeing another 700 with various ailments. The next day, she said, they came to Cange to attend mass at Father Lafontant’s Episcopal Church. “I brought the residents here and they just started weeping,” Mukherjee said, “because they saw what 20 years of engagement can do.” Though it got its start in Haiti, Partners In Health’s work expands beyond that island nation. Since the mid-1990s, the organization has worked in the United States, running programs based on the Haitian model of community-based care for the sickest and most marginalized HIV patients in Boston. At about the same time, it tackled a job that international health experts said was hopeless: treating multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis among Peru’s urban poor. Later that decade, Zanmi Lasante in Haiti turned to treatment of those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The prevailing wisdom at the time was that AIDS couldn’t be treated in poor countries because the drugs were too expensive and too complicated to administer without robust health care systems like those typically seen in the industrialized world. But with a relentless belief that people will stop saying “It can’t be done” if someone proves that it can, Farmer, Kim, and the small army of people following their lead have again and again shown that decent health care can be brought to the world’s poor. “We push the limits of the possible, set it up, and put it in place,” Kim said. “We don’t have the argument [about whether it’s possible] until we’ve tried it. And once we’ve tried it, the argument changes.” Partners In Health operates in the nations it serves through a network of clinics and an army of community health workers who extend the clinics’ reach into the countryside. Together, they offer a comprehensive continuum of care that has not only been hailed for its effectiveness and replicated in nine countries, but which is forming the foundation for a new academic discipline in global health delivery at Harvard, spearheaded by Kim. The model treats not only the medical conditions patients present, but also attacks their underlying causes – whose roots often lie in poverty. Farmer said it’s been described as a “whatever it takes” approach, a description of which he approves. The can-do approach means taking steps that would be foreign to physicians in major urban hospitals. It means hours-long treks over mountain pathways to check on a patient. It means not just giving a nourishing treatment for malnutrition, but planting the peanuts to make it, and roasting them yourself. It means not just advising HIV-positive mothers to use formula to feed their babies and to be sure they use clean water to mix the formula, but also casting large concrete containers to filter impurities from the water supply. It means being able to communicate with both a nation’s president and its poorest residents. It means missing meals, missing sleep, endless travel, and tireless dedication. That can-do approach is tested daily by the conditions in which the organization works. Along the road to the clinic at Boucan Carré in Haiti, for example, rainy season floods have led to the deaths of two women from complications of their pregnancies and destroyed a Land Rover crossing with supplies. Partners In Health is pressing the Haiti government to build a bridge to provide a safe crossing, but the amount appropriated is not enough for the job, leaving Partners In Health – which has already commissioned a study of bridge feasibility – searching for a solution. “It’s burdensome enough to know that you’re going to have to build the operating room,” Farmer said, discussing the situation’s frustrations. “You want to take care of people? You have to build the operating room and find the electricity and do the supply chain and make sure you have sutures and an autoclave to sterilize things. So all that work has to get done . and then you have to build a bridge?” Despite the organization’s whatever-it-takes flexibility, at its heart lies a unwavering belief: that people living in the Third World shouldn’t get second-class care. In other words, women needing a Caesarean section shouldn’t die on a riverbank simply because there’s no way across. The organization strives to provide care that is up to modern medical standards despite the challenges that come with working in places where communication, transportation, electricity, and even water are sometimes lacking. The patients know that and come flooding. At site after site, PIH physicians tell a similar story. When they arrive to take over operations of an existing clinic, it typically sees just a few patients a day. Meanwhile, in the surrounding countryside, the sick and dying suffer at home. They stay home because they can’t afford the fees charged to see a doctor or nurse, more fees for medical supplies, such as sutures to close a wound, and another round of fees for antibiotics and other medicines. To top it off, there may be no medicine to be had and no doctors to be seen. With clinic staffing unreliable, the patient could make the exhausting and painful journey there, only to be without care and far from home. Better to stay in bed, surrounded by loved ones. One of the first changes Partners In Health makes is reliability. Clinics are always open and there is always a doctor available. The clinics use modern inventory control techniques to ensure needed supplies and medicines are available. And, though they often charge a nominal fee to those who can afford it – 60 cents at the clinic in Lascahobas, Haiti – they don’t turn anyone away for lack of money. The patients respond. Traffic typically increases dramatically within a year, tenfold or more, as word spreads that reliable care is available. Physical expansion of the facility often follows. Jines Sophonie brought his 19-month-old son, Jean, to the clinic at Lascahobas in January after he fell into a cooking fire and suffered burns across much of his small body. Sophonie said they made the 30-minute ride on a motorcycle from distant Savonet. When asked why he made the trip to Lascahobas, Sophonie said simply, “There’s nowhere else.” Nearby sat 2-year-old Davelnor Mirales, whose mother carried him as she hiked three hours over Haiti’s hills to reach the small clinic. Mirales was suffering from kwashiorkor, a starvation-related condition characterized by a swollen stomach and legs, stunted growth, and skin and hair abnormalities. The doctors at Lascahobas started Davelnor on a diet of milk until his body could handle a more nutrient-packed food called Nourimanba, manufactured by Partners In Health, Haiti, from locally grown peanuts, milk powder, vitamins, and oil. Assistant Professor of Medicine Louise Ivers, who divides her time between her work in Haiti with Partners In Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, said that the Nourimanba has produced dramatic results compared with more traditional treatments for malnutrition, reducing swelling from kwashiorkor in as little as a week. The most recent phase in Partners In Health’s history has been one of expansion. In 2002, the organization received a large grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria that fueled dramatic expansion of its HIV program in Haiti. Three years later, a request from the government of Rwanda and funding from the Clinton Foundation’s HIV/AIDS Initiative put Partners In Health on the front lines of the global AIDS epidemic, fighting the disease where the epidemic burns hottest: sub-Saharan Africa. Invitations from other governments followed. The organization and its suite of wraparound services aim to improve treatment and prevention of infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Partners In Health’s “four pillars” of AIDS care are prevention and treatment of HIV itself in the context of improved primary health care, which encourages people to visit clinics and agree to be tested for HIV; detection and treatment of tuberculosis – since tuberculosis is often associated with AIDS and is the leading cause of death among people infected by HIV; detection and treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and an emphasis on improving women’s health. Women’s health is an important component of HIV/TB care because it allows early diagnosis of HIV in newborns, allows doctors to monitor mother-infant transmission, and is an important focus in nations where childbirth remains a leading cause of death. A housing program for needy families living with AIDS and an emphasis on food security provide important additional support. Since antiretroviral drugs need to be taken daily, a critical part of Partners In Health’s program lies in a corps of community health workers who conduct daily rounds and visit patients in their homes. During these visits, the workers not only ensure the patients take their medicines, they also monitor their general condition, their living situation, and the health of others in the household, providing an important route for early intervention. Cenatus-Pierre Gaston, who discovered he was infected with HIV more than three years ago after seeking treatment for tuberculosis, said Partners In Health’s Haitian arm, Zanmi Lasante, saved his life, allowing him to marry and to work to help others stricken with the disease. “I gathered my courage and said, ‘My life isn’t over,’” Gaston said. “If Zanmi Lasante wasn’t there, these bones wouldn’t be here anymore. I’d already be dead for three years and six months.” Because of the nature of HIV treatment, Kim said work on the disease provides an opportunity to transform health care around the globe. An incurable ailment that can be controlled with an ongoing regimen of powerful drugs, HIV can only be effectively treated through established health care systems. In nations that have none, Partners In Health is building them as it goes, one clinic at a time. “We’ve always had just outrageously huge ambitions to treat the poor,” Kim said. “The most common thing in the world is to set low goals for people who are powerless.”last_img read more

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Hooper: call police over ‘corrupt’ referral fees

first_imgA former Court of Appeal judge earlier this week called for lawyers who pay or receive ‘corrupt’ referral fees to be reported to the police. Lord Justice Hooper told the bar conference that the growth of referral fees, which ‘corruptly’ influence the choice of trial advocate, is the most pernicious consequence of the government’s ‘savage’ legal aid cuts. The Legal Services Board decided not to ban referral fees, but under the bar’s code of conduct the payment of a referral fee by a barrister is not permitted. Hooper said that such fees are paid or incurred by barristers in four situations, including where fees are paid by the trial advocate to a solicitor with conduct of the case and where a service is provided by a group of advocates to a solicitor, for example, where Crown court work is given to a set in return for magistrates’ court work being done for nothing. They are also involved where the advocate who attends the preliminary case management hearing pays another advocate to do the case, or where a litigator whose client has the benefit of legal aid for two advocates requires the trial advocate to use an in-house advocate from the litigator’s firm in exchange for receiving the instructions to conduct the trial. ‘Such fees are unlawful and unprofessional. But professionalism is at risk in the face of the cuts which both branches of the professions have suffered,’ he said. Hooper said that the payment of referral fees may lead to cases being undertaken by advocates who lack the competency to do so. Judges, he said, need to adopt a more ‘robust’ approach to ensure all advocates are sufficiently competent, which may include adjourning or halting a trial. ‘If corrupt referral fees are suspected, it is time to involve the police,’ he suggested. Chair of the Criminal Bar Association, Michael Turner QC, called referral fess ‘bribery for briefs’ and said they are now ‘commonplace’. Disagreeing with the LSB’s views that they are fair competition, Turner said: ‘Public money being used by barristers to pay solicitors to instruct them, solicitors paying clients to instruct them. It is not fair competition, it is a crime under the government’s own legislation; the Bribery Act.’ On the impact of the fees, Christopher Convey, from the bar’s professional practice committee, said: ‘Referral fees are killing the publicly funded bar from the bottom up.’ The vice-chair elect of the Bar Standards Board Patricia Robertson QC asked for evidence from the profession of referral fees and their detrimental effect. He said it would be put to the LSB to support a call to have referral fees banned.last_img read more

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Selkirk College Saints Captain Reflects on Wild Three-Year Journey

first_imgIt’s not the ending Selkirk College Saints’ captain Parker Wakaruk anticipated.On March 12, the Saints had traveled to Langley and were preparing for the first-round British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) playoff series against the Trinity Western University Spartans when they received news that all games were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.     “We knew what was happening with professional leagues at that moment, but we still had to get ready to play. We were hoping that some way we would be able to get through that series,” Wakaruk says about the moment after the pre-game skate that they were delivered the news to pack up their bags.“It was weird because you are just done. You don’t win, you don’t lose, you are just done. There is no emotion to it, it’s a real bizarre feeling. There is no closure or any kind of exit… it’s just over. It’s a month later and still it’s a weird feeling.”Heading into the best-of-three semi-final series, the Saints had a massive challenge ahead if they were to return to the West Kootenay with a chance to play in the league title the following weekend. The defending champion Spartans finished 21 points ahead of Selkirk College in the regular season and were the clear favourites to repeat, but the Saints had little to lose and wore the underdog label with pride.  The players fully realized that cancellation of the season was necessary, but the bus ride back to the West Kootenay was difficult. The situation was even more heartbreaking for those graduating from the program, a group of players that included Wakaruk.“It builds on the idea that you never really know when it’s going to be your last game,” he says. “It’s a whole new meaning of ‘playing every game like it’s your last’ because at least for me, I may never play a competitive hockey game again and have an opportunity to win a championship.”A Life-Changing ExperienceWakaruk arrived to the Castlegar Campus in 2017 carrying a hockey bag stuffed with junior level experience and a mind set on finding his educational passion. After graduating from high school in Lethbridge, Alberta, the talented defencemen left home and took his hockey talents to Junior A hockey. He played two seasons with the Grand Prairie Storm (AJHL) before shifting a province over and finishing his junior career with the Humboldt Broncos (SJHL). He knew little about where he was coming and was unsure about what he wanted out of the academic side of his next chapter. He started his learning journey in the School of Academic Upgrading where he was able to ease back into the classroom, a place he had not been for three years. Empowered by his success, he chose the two-year Business Administration Program as a focus and is currently putting the finishing touches on his diploma. “It’s a really great place to learn, both in the classroom and in life,” he says. “I have grown quite a bit in the last three years.”A major part of his growth has come via events out of his control.The horrific Humboldt Broncos team bus accident that killed 16 people in April 2018 turned the hockey world upside-down. For Wakaruk, the moment cut even deeper. He was a former teammate and friends with several of those involved in the tragedy. Wakaruk had to come to terms with the weight of heavy grief. “It was devastating… you don’t want to believe what you heard and that it’s real,” he says. “It gives you perspective on how quickly things can be taken away from you and how quickly things can change without warning or any real reason. You have to deal with it and figure out ways to get through it, you grow from it.”Dealing with the New NormalThe move away from in-person learning to alternate methods of delivery due to the COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult for Selkirk College students. The isolation and uncertainty of the final weeks of the Winter Semester has delivered additional stress to students in all programs.Wakaruk is using the lessons learned to this point for guidance through the final weeks. Like many students from out of region, he has moved back to his parent’s house and is currently in Okotoks, Alberta completing assignments and studying for finals. “We are living through history right now,” he says. “As students, we need to use our support systems. Set up meeting times for a group-chat with your classmates to get the work done or complete the projects. It’s difficult, but you need to create the most normal atmosphere as you can. If you try to do it all by yourself, you are just going to struggle and all your motivation goes right down the drain.”Hooked on Life in the West KootenayIf all goes according to plan, Wakaruk will land right back at Selkirk College in September where he will hang up the skates and put his primary focus on earning an Advanced Diploma in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).“I was going to use Selkirk College as a stepping stone to another place or another school,” says the 23-year-old. “After being in an awesome small community and seeing what Selkirk College has to offer, it has what I want right here.”Like so many who arrive to the West Kootenay from elsewhere, Wakaruk quickly developed a fondness for the region’s mountains, rivers and bounty of outdoor recreation. Having grown up on the icy prairies, he has grown fond of both the weather and the geography in his new home.“You can go skiing, fishing and biking in the same day… I’ve done it,” Wakaruk says with a smile. “You don’t get a chance to do that in too many places, it’s unique here. I’m glad I found myself in this place.”last_img read more

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Senate confirms William Barr as Attorney General

first_img(AP) The Senate has confirmed William Barr as attorney general, placing the veteran government official and lawyer atop the Justice Department as special counsel Robert Mueller investigates Russian interference in the 2016 election.The Senate voted 54-45 to confirm Barr, who previously served as attorney general from 1991 to 1993.Barr will succeed Jeff Sessions, who was pushed out by President Donald Trump last year. The president was angry with Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia investigation.As the country’s chief law enforcement officer, Barr will oversee the remaining work in Mueller’s investigation of potential coordination between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign.Democrats largely voted against Barr. They said they were concerned about his non-committal stance on making Mueller’s report public.last_img read more

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North American stocks plunge in early trading amid ChinaUS trade talk worries

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:GSPTSE, TSX:CADUSD=X)The Canadian Press TORONTO — North American stock markets plunged in early trading amid worries that the arrest of a senior executive at Chinese telecom equipment maker Huawei could derail progress in China-U.S. trade talks.The S&P/TSX composite index was down 340.34 points at 14,842.30.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 393.88 points at 24,633.19. The S&P 500 index was down 40.18 points at 2,659.88, while the Nasdaq composite was down 100.07 points at 7,058.36.The Canadian dollar traded for 74.57 cents US compared with an average of 74.89 cents US on Wednesday.The January crude oil contract was down US$1.44 at US$51.45 per barrel and the January natural gas contract was down 15.7 cents at US$4.31 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$5.10 at US$1,247.70 an ounce and the March copper contract was down 4.90 cents at US$2.73 a pound.last_img read more

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ND Tiwari’s son died due to smothering: Autopsy report

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Police on Thursday lodged a case of murder in connection with the death of ND Tiwari’s son Rohit Shekhar. The investigating agency said that the autopsy report pointed to unnatural death caused by smothering.According to police, the case was transferred to the crime branch for further investigation. They are questioning Rohit’s family members, including his mother Ujjwala and his uncle’s son. The investigating agency will also question Rohit’s wife in the case. “We are probing whether the pillow was used for smothering when he might be sleeping,” said sources. “The medical board unanimously concluded that the cause of death in this case is asphyxia as a result of strangulation and smothering. It is a sudden unnatural death, placed in the category of homicide,” the head of the AIIMS’ forensic department, Dr Sudhir Gupta, said. The investigation is focussing whether there is any role of Rohit’s family members behind his murder as after the incident, none of them lodged a complaint. Earlier on Wednesday, DCP (South) Vijay Kumar said that the family members do not suspect any foul play in his death. The probe also revealed there are CCTV cameras installed in Rohit’s house which are being scanned. Facts also came out that some cameras were not working properly which is probed. Police have registered a murder case under section 302 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) against unknown persons. According to Joint Commissioner (Southern Range) Devesh Shrivastava, Rohit suffered a nose bleed, which his servants reported to his mother. Later, he was taken to hospital where he was declared brought dead on Tuesday. His postmortem was conducted by a panel of doctors. Apart from the domestic help, Rohit’ wife and elder brother were inside the house. At the time of the incident his mother Ujjwala Tiwari, who was admitted at Max hospital, received a call from her house about her son being “unwell and bleeding from the nose” Earlier, while talking to media, deceased’s mother Ujjawla Tiwari said that her son was alright. When reporters asked about some foul play in the incident, she said that there are several things which she will reveal at the right time. “The people who are behind my son’s depression I will reveal their details,” said Ujjawla Tiwari. Rohit Shekhar Tiwari famously fought a long-drawn battle with his father ND Tiwari, who for the longest time refused to accept him as his son. In 2014, after the number of denials, lawsuits and a DNA test, ND Tiwari finally accepted that Rohit as his son. Later, ND Tiwari married Ujjwala Tiwari, the mother of Rohit Shekhar in a ceremony that took place in Lucknow. The police will investigate the case from different angles which include any family dispute, property dispute or any political involvement. with Agency inputslast_img read more

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Kevin Durant Is Playing Like Kevin Durant Again

Source: Basketball-Reference.com 201220632910721.8 20166483311113.5 The obvious small-sample-size caveats strongly apply, but Durant has played like his usual self these past few games. First and foremost, he’s shooting the ball in line with his career norms again — and while most of that is due to better “shot-making” and not improved shot quality, Durant’s been an ace shot-maker for as long as we can track the statistic. For KD, not outshooting expectations is the freak outlier. He’s also played much better D, lowering his defensive rating (that’s good!) and raising his rank in points allowed per chance to the 65th percentile since May 2 despite matching up against tougher offensive competition. 1Weighted by the number of defensive plays he had matched up against each opponent, the average player Durant has checked since May 2 had a regular-season offensive BPM of +1.5, vs. a +0.2 mark for those he was guarding through April 30.Although the series is all tied up, San Antonio is still a 69 percent favorite to advance according to our Elo predictions. But if Durant can keep playing like the all-time great we’re accustomed to seeing don that No. 35 jersey — instead of the second-rate version who wore it early in these playoffs — the Thunder still have a decent chance to knock out one of the greatest teams in NBA history.Check out our latest NBA predictions. Last three663210721.2 201117582910820.3 PLAYOFF GAMESTRUE SHOOTING %USAGE %DEF. RATINGAVG. GAME SCORE 20106503510714.1 201311573210323.1 Kevin Durant is already one of the greatest players in modern history; that goes just as much for the playoffs as it does the regular season. Durant ranks 13th since the merger in playoff Value Over Replacement (VORP) through age 27; in six career postseasons, he’s led the Thunder to an NBA Finals berth and two other conference finals, with the possibility of a third looking surprisingly strong after Durant’s 41 points (on 25 shots) powered Oklahoma City to a win in Game 4 of the Thunder’s second series.This season, Durant answered whatever doubts arose during his injury-riddled 2014-15 season by posting the second-best campaign of his career (on a per-minute basis). But in the playoffs, he got off to an uncharacteristically rough start. After five games against the Dallas Mavericks and a brutal Game 1 drubbing at the hands of the favored San Antonio Spurs, Durant’s postseason numbers in 2016 were the worst of his career. Sure, Durant was averaging 24.3 points per contest over that span, but he was also shooting a horrific 37.1 percent from the floor, playing uninspired defense — according to SportVU player-tracking data, he was in the 23rd percentile of playoff defenders in points allowed per offensive chance — and helping teammates less than usual with his playmaking. And with more games looming against the historically dominant Spurs defense, things looked bad for Durant.Instead, Durant has turned his playoff campaign around — strength of opponent be damned. In Game 2, he scored 28 points on his best shooting night of the playoffs to date, as the Thunder took a rare road victory at the AT&T Center. And although the Thunder lost Game 3, Durant scored 26 and continued to shoot well, providing hope that a huge KD signature game wasn’t far away.That big game finally came in Game 4 — at least, in the second half. Held to 12 points on 4-for-12 shooting at halftime, Durant was as less-than-stellar as he’d looked earlier in the postseason. But down the stretch, he poured in 29 with an effective field goal percentage of 90.9 percent, single-handedly outscoring the Spurs 9-1 in the game’s final three minutes. OKC’s victory knotted the series up at 2-2, and added another data point to Durant’s mid-playoff statistical turnaround: YEARGAMESTRUE SHOOTING %USAGE %DEF. RATINGAVG. GAME SCORE Durant’s rocky playoff start 2016 statistics through April 30Source: Basketball-Reference.com Durant’s mid-playoff turnaround First six483311113.5 201419573210820.8 read more

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Mitchells Big Ten tournamentrecord 43 leads Ohio State womens basketball into semifinals

OSU sophomore guard Kelsey Mitchell (3) dribbles the ball during a game against Rutgers on Jan. 10 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorINDIANAPOLIS — Coming into the Bankers Life Fieldhouse for the Big Ten tournament on a two-game losing streak, No. 9 Ohio State (24-6, 15-3) wasn’t looking to take 10th-seeded Rutgers (18-14, 8-10) lightly.OSU sophomore guard Kelsey Mitchell took matters into her own hands, dropping 43 points to break a Big Ten tournament record for single-game scoring and directing the Buckeyes to a 73-58 victory over the Scarlet Knights in the quarterfinals.Mitchell has scored 91 points in her last two games, pushing herself to No. 11 on OSU’s all-time scoring list by tallying 1,650 points in mere two-year career.Although it seemed as though Mitchell could do no wrong, OSU had a difficult time getting shots to fall from the tip.“Coach (Kevin) McGuff just put the emphasis on we were a little too anxious,” Mitchell said. “Getting a lot of quick shots and just trying to rush the ball a bit more.”The Buckeyes had one of their most sluggish shooting performances of the season in the first half, going 10-of-33 from the field and finishing the first 20 minutes of play with only 26 points. All but eight of those first-half points came from the fingertips of Mitchell.Friday night’s first-half outing was OSU’s second-lowest scoring performance in a first half this season, with its low being 24 points against No. 1 Connecticut at the beginning of the season.Like the Buckeyes, the Scarlet Knights weren’t able to get offensive production from all five players on the court. Instead, senior forward Kahleah Cooper and junior guard Tyler Scaife anchored the Scarlet Knight offense.Scaife utilized her quickness to get to the rim, ending the half with 16 points, while Copper put her power in the paint to good use to chip in 13.Playing catch-up after a slow start in the first half is not a situation that the Buckeyes would consider foreign, but now, in a playoff environment, there was a bit more urgency for the Scarlet and Gray.“Well, the thing we talked about is just getting more balance in our offense,” McGuff said.“We ran more set plays to get drives and get the ball into the paint, either off a pass or off the dribble, and just so we wouldn’t settle for so many threes.”OSU was able to get its first lead of the game at the 7:15 mark after a 3-pointer from Mitchell. After the deep ball, the Buckeyes were able to regain the confidence and swagger that they were searching for. They did not look back for the rest of the game — kind of.The positive feelings of the second half came to a screeching halt when an injury left OSU holding its breath. Senior guard Ameryst Alston crashed into a few Scarlet Knights players in an attempt to grab a loose ball and injured her wrist on the ground, leaving the Buckeye fans in attendance in shock.The collision would send Alston to the locker room early, ending her night with 12 points. She later returned to the bench in the waning seconds with an ice bag resting on her wrist.“Yeah, she came down,” McGuff said. “I think she sprained maybe her wrist. But I don’t have much more than that. I just had a quick update, that was it.”OSU is set to continue its journey through the Big Ten tournament Saturday evening approximately 30 minutes following the semifinal matchup between Maryland and Northwestern, which is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m.The Buckeyes are slated to face third-seeded Michigan State with a spot to get to the championship game on Sunday night at 7 p.m. on the line. The Spartans beat OSU in triple overtime in the regular-season finale last Saturday. read more

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