News / Ceva the latest 3PL to sign up for Kontainers’ Enterprise platform

first_imgOther customers of the Enterprise platform include Toll Group and Maersk Line. Kontainers chief executive Graham Parker said: “More than 25% of the top 20 now use Kontainers as their primary e-commerce solution, with the same number again considering at a very advanced stage. “We will now announce a new top 20 global freight brand every month until the end of the year, as the clear ramp-up has accelerated for freight brands for their e-commerce capabilities to address customer demand to digitally engage and transact with business partners online.  “Kontainers software will power more than one million bookings in 2020.” The Loadstar understands that three new major customers are set  to sign up for the platform in the final quarter of the year. Signing Ceva follows the recent launch of Kontainers’ third e-commerce platform, Essential, the final part of a trio of platforms that include Edge, as well as Enterprise. “The first platform, Kontainers Enterprise was for the top 100 shipping brands; Kontainers Edge was for medium-sized forwarders turning over a couple of hundred million in revenue; Kontainers Essential is for any company with two people upwards,” Mr Parker said.  He added that since Essential’s launch in July, some 250 SME forwarders had signed up, with the first 25 due to go live this month. Ceva Logistics has become the latest 3PL to sign up to use the Kontainers Enterprise suite that enables the largest freight forwarders to rapidly digitise the shipper-facing aspects of their operations. Kontainers revealed at last night that Ceva had signed a seven-year deal to utilise its Enterprise platform, which enables the larger 3PLs to interact more effectively with smaller shippers. Enterprise provides a digital interface across 12 modules: instant rates; booking; Customs; trucking; FCL; LCL; global schedules; bill of lading; chat support; dashboard analytics; payment system; and a full back office application. The investment is part of a digital transformation strategy underway at Ceva since it was acquired by CMA CGM earlier this year.  The new management promised a “quicker roll-out of technology both in Freight Management and Contract Logistics [divisions] to achieve more automated processes and better standardisation” as part of its business turnaround plan.  By Gavin van Marle 10/09/2019last_img read more

Read more

Inflation eases in July: OECD

Related news Stagflation is U.S. economists’ biggest fear, SIFMA says Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Another jump in prices tightens the squeeze on U.S. consumers Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Annual inflation eased a little in July, due to slower growth in energy and food prices, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). It reported that inflation in the OECD area rose by 1.9% in the year to July, down from 2.0% in June, as the rise in energy and food prices ebbed. Energy price inflation dropped to 0.7% in July, down from 1.4% in June. And, food price inflation slowed to its lowest rate since September 2009, coming in at 2.3% in July, compared with 2.8% in June. Excluding food and energy, the OECD annual inflation rate was unchanged at 1.8% in July. James Langton Keywords InflationCompanies Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development The OECD reports that prices continued to fall in Japan (by -0.4% in July, down from -0.2% in June). And, that annual inflation slowed sharply in the U.S. (to 1.4% in July, down from 1.7 % in June) and more moderately in Canada (to 1.3%, down from 1.5%) and Italy. Elsewhere in Europe, inflation remained stable in France and Germany, but increased in Britain. Among emerging markets, annual inflation continued to decelerate in South Africa, China and India, but it accelerated sharply in Russia, and also rose a bit in Brazil and Indonesia, the OECD says. It also reports that, on a month-over-month basis, consumer prices in the OECD area fell by 0.1% in July. They fell by 0.4% in France, by 0.3% in Japan, 0.2% in the U.S., and 0.1% in Canada. They rose by 0.1% in Italy and Britain, and by 0.4% in Germany. U.S. economy is warming up, but unlikely to overheat: Moody’s read more

Read more

Serious COVID, environmental and labour rights concerns plague Australian Antarctic Division replacement vessel

first_imgSerious COVID, environmental and labour rights concerns plague Australian Antarctic Division replacement vessel Maritime Union of AustraliaSeafarers are warning of significant COVID, environmental and employment issues on-board the icebreaker contracted by the Australian Antarctic Division for this summer following the retirement of the iconic Aurora Australis.The warnings come as it was revealed the MPV Everest, which was contracted for this summer after construction delays prevented the arrival of the Aurora’s permanent replacement vessel the RSV Nuyina, would be crewed by foreign seafarers who have never worked in the Australian Antarctic Territory.The Maritime Union of Australia said the need to keep the Antarctic mission COVID free was being unnecessarily jeopardised through the use of foreign seafarers, particularly as the Australian crew from the Aurora — with decades of experience in Antarctica — could have been used.The union also warned that the use of foreign seafarers with no Antarctic experience posed a risk to the pristine and sensitive environment, while also reducing the overall safety of the scientific mission.“The Australian Antarctic Division has serious questions to answer about why they have chosen to use foreign seafarers who lack the extensive experience of Australian seafarers operating in the unique and challenging conditions of Antarctica,” MUA Assistant National Secretary Ian Bray said.“Especially during the COVID crisis, when this virus is running rampant in much of the world, the use of foreign seafarers poses an unnecessary biosecurity risk to the entire mission.“The Federal Government should be insisting the AAD utilise Australian seafarers who have worked on the Aurora, given their proven track record of safety and environmental protection.“We fear the choice to use foriegn workers is a financial one, with the AAD putting safety and the environment at risk in an effort to avoid Australian employment laws, wages and employment standards.”MUA Tasmania Branch Secretary Jason Campbell said the AAD should have immediately looked to employ experienced Australian seafarers for this summer once it learnt of construction delays facing the Aurora’s replacement vessel the Nuyina.“As soon as the AAD became aware of the major delays to construction of the Nuyina, which meant it would not be delivered on time to carry out shipping tasks in Antarctica this summer, they should have looked to contract the Aurora for another summer,” Mr Campbell said.“Failing that, they should have secured the use of the officers and crew from the Aurora, given these Australian seafarers have the necessary experience and continuity of service in Antarctica to ensure a safe and successful mission.“At a time when COVID has resulted in massive job losses around the country, the AAD should be prioritising the employment of Australians in the Marine Science Program.“The Federal Government has serious questions to answer about why it approved the use of a foreign foreign crewed vessel when an Australian crewed vessel, the Aurora Australia, would have been available.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Antarctica, Australia, Australian, Australian Antarctic Division, employment, environment, Federal, federal government, Government, maritime, Maritime Union of Australia, retirement, running, science, Secretary, Tasmanialast_img read more

Read more

Council sets up Sanctuary Point Oval for success this athletics season

first_imgCouncil sets up Sanctuary Point Oval for success this athletics season Shoalhaven City Council is delivering on its commitment to provide improvements to Sanctuary Point Oval for the upcoming athletics season.The oval’s $326,000 irrigation and drainage project is nearly complete, with irrigation work finished and drainage works set to be completed by next week.Councillors Bob Proudfoot, Mark Kitchener, Patricia White, John Wells, and Joanna Gash met with the St Georges Basin Little Athletics Centre President, Tracy Mandavy recently to discuss ongoing support of the oval.Shoalhaven City Council Mayor Amanda Findley is excited about how the oval is shaping up: “We’re really looking forward to working closely with St Georges Basin Little Athletics Centre to have the oval ready for next season.”“Beyond the irrigation and drainage works, we plan to assist with new line markings, and over the next year we’ll be working to improve the soil and address weed issues so that Sanctuary Point Oval is a great resource for our little champions-to-be and the whole community,” Clr Findley said.The irrigation and drainage works were funded by a grant from the NSW Government. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:community, council, Government, local council, NSW, President, project, Sanctuary Point, season, Shoalhaven, Shoalhaven City Council, St George, St Georges Basinlast_img read more

Read more

10 things to do this week: Dec. 12 edition

first_img Published: Dec. 12, 2016 Categories:Things to DoCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img Happy holidays Buffaloes! It’s finals week. Make sure to keep it quiet out of respect for your fellow Buffs still studying for their exams. The city of Boulder is having a lot of fun this week and over break, and hosting many student-friendly events, so get up and at ‘em! I am Sarah Ellsworth: IPHY major, Boulder native, and event connoisseur, writing to you from the comfort of beautiful CU-Boulder on all of your weekly opportunities for community involvement, educational whatnot and supreme fun. Enjoy the break and good luck on your finals everyone!Tuesday, Dec. 13Relaxation station. Free massage. Need I say more? Swing by the FitWell Suite in The Rec for free chair massages, tea, candy, coloring and aromatherapy from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., or 4 to 6 p.m., or on Dec. 14, 11 a.m. to 2  p.m. and take a break from the stress of studying and testing. This is all totally free to students, so take advantage! Relaxation stationGo to Norlin for your studying needs. Norlin Library will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. all week long for your convenience. If you feel like climbing over the rest of the CU student body into the last available chair, then you will have a nice, silent place to study all day long. The Laughing Goat will be open quite late as well for your nourishment needs. Ignite Chanukah. Ignite is the Boulder version of short little TED talks, where members of the community share their passions in a five-minute format. Come celebrate the holidays with a Chanukah themed Ignite, featuring an after party with food and raffle tickets, at the Rembrandt Yard Art Gallery from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $25. Ignite ChanukahOpen poetry reading. Innisfree Cafe on the Hill hosts a weekly poetry reading open mic night every Tuesday for your listening pleasure. You can come and listen or read your own poetry if you sign up by 6:55 p.m. The reading starts at 7 p.m. and runs through 8:30 p.m., so come and relax and sip some coffee and enjoy some fine poetry. Poetry readingThursday, Dec. 15eTown BIFF short movie night. eTown Hall and the Boulder International Film Festival host a special movie night from 7 to 9 p.m., featuring BIFF’s best short films of the year. These are little seen foreign films exploring a broad and eclectic range of life’s topics, so don’t miss out. Tickets are $5. Short movie nightColorado Winter Skies Planetarium show. If you love staring at the sky on a clear Colorado night, then you’ll love Fiske’s Colorado Winter Skies show, which is free to students with a valid Buff OneCard at 7 p.m. Take a peek at the current star layout in the local skies on the big dome. Colorado Winter SkiesOver the breakWinter Solstice Ecstatic Dance at the StarHouse. Often forgotten in the season of the holidays, the Winter Solstice is a fun thing to celebrate. It’s the shortest day of the year, and the Boulder StarHouse hosts an annual ecstatic dance to commemorate the return of the light and burn off some Christmas cookies. With million dollar views, the StarHouse (3476 Sunshine Canyon Dr.) opens up this dance at 7 p.m. on Dec. 22, and tickets are $10 with a student ID. StarHouse danceHit the slopes. All of the local ski resorts are open, so strap on your skis or your board and get a few runs in for the early season. I recommend carpooling with your friends if you’re driving I-70 up to Summit County and bring your own lunch. Whether you’re a veteran skier or a newbie, the time has finally come to start your ski season. Or try the Ski Bus.Go home and enjoy the holidays.last_img read more

Read more

Common plants and pollinators act as anchors for ecosystems

first_imgTop: Micromoths on a flower of leafy cinquefoil (Drymocallis fissa). Bottom: Colorado blue columbine (Aquilegia coerulea), the state flower of Colorado. (Credit Julian Resasco)  What’s common is crucialFor the past six years, Resasco has returned to the same mountain meadow in the morning each week, between snowmelt in May and the return of snowfall in September, to observe bumblebees, flies and beetles dance and hop between daisies, roses and lupines at six different marked plots. There’s nothing particularly unique about this east-facing meadow, surrounded by aspen and spruce-fir forest. But here, just below Niwot Ridge at 9,500 feet above sea level, near the CU Boulder Mountain Research Station, Resasco counted 267 different species of pollinators that visited the flowers of 41 species of plants—and an encouragingly healthy number of generalists. Even Resasco, an experienced ecologist recently selected as an early career fellow by the Ecological Society of America (ESA), was surprised by the biodiversity that this meadow supports. Returning year after year to the same place, he found himself noticing more and more about the place. “Every year teaches you something different,” he said. And these findings teach us that what is common could be crucial to help ecosystems weather current and future environmental change. From setting conservation priorities that protect generalists to leaving your local flies and flowers in peace, there are many ways to support these critical but common species.  Between late June and late July, these plants and pollinators will bloom and bustle in our backyards and nearby mountain meadows, awaiting hikers eager to see them. But if there aren’t Instagram-worthy columbines waiting for you when you go, don’t despair. “If you just take some time to stop and observe what’s around you, it’s always interesting,” said Resasco. “Don’t overlook the common generalists.” Additional authors on this paper include Natacha P. Chacoff of the Institute of Regional Ecology, CONICET and Faculty of Natural Sciences and IML, National University of Tucumán; and Diego P. Vázquez of the Argentine Institute for Dryland Research and Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, National University of Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina. Categories:EnvironmentNews Headlines Top: A fly visiting the flowers of alpine false springparsley (Pseudocymopterus montanus). Bottom: The hoverfly (Chrysotoxum sp.) visiting Wood’s rose (Rosa woodsii). (Credit Julian Resasco)  Published: April 19, 2021 • By Kelsey Simpkins Banner image: A bumblebee (Bombus sp.) visiting the flowers of Rocky Mountain goldenrod (Solidago multiradiata). (Credit: Julian Resasco) The next time you go for a hike, take an extra moment to appreciate the seemingly ordinary life all around you. A house fly, humble yarrow weed and other “generalist” plants and pollinators play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity and may also serve as buffers against some impacts of climate change, finds new CU Boulder research. The findings, published this month in Ecology, provide valuable insights for prioritizing the conservation of species that contribute to the strength of ecological communities. “A lot of times, conservation efforts are geared toward things that are rare. But oftentimes, species that are common are also in decline and could go extinct, and that could have really big repercussions for maintaining biodiversity,” said Julian Resasco, lead author on the study and assistant professor of ecology. center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail A “generalist” simply refers to a species that interacts with a lot of other species. For example: A bee that visits many different species of flowers, or conversely, a flower that’s visited by many species of bees and other pollinators, said Resasco. Bumblebees are well-known generalists, their fuzzy, cute bumbling bodies having garnered a large fan base of admirers over the years. But there are unsung heroes among generalist pollinators, including an insect that we often consider with disdain: flies. According to Resasco, some flies are the most common visitors to flowers, and they visit lots of different flowers. Generalist plants that Colorado residents may recognize include mountain parsley (Pseudocymopterus montanus), which are made up of bunches of small yellow flowers, and common yarrow (Achillea millefolium), which looks similar but are usually white. These plants may not be the famous, brightly colored specimens that wildflower enthusiasts go looking for in summer, but this research finds their role is important to the ecological stability of the meadows where beloved columbine, fireweed and Indian paintbrush grow. Ecologists have long studied networks of interactions between plants and pollinators, and previous research has shown that generalists can be found time and time again within and across landscapes, and during warm seasons or over several years. What this new study finds is that within seasons, over the span of many years and across the landscape, generalists are able to persist and act as anchors for their communities. Because so many species rely on generalists, having healthy populations of them helps support a robust community of plants and pollinators that are less susceptible to local extinctions, said Resasco. This robustness may also be important for buffering against increasing unequal shifts in the seasonal timing of species interaction due to climate change, known as phenological mismatch.last_img read more

Read more

Recording Studio To Be Set Up In Western St. Mary

first_imgRecording Studio To Be Set Up In Western St. Mary Office of the Prime MinisterJune 24, 2010 Advertisements RelatedRecording Studio To Be Set Up In Western St. Mary FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Plans are afoot to set up a community recording studio next to the newly refurbished Three Hills Community Centre and Sports Complex, in Western St. Mary.This announcement was made last week by State Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister, with responsibility for Local Government, Hon. Robert Montague, at the handing over ceremony for the centre and sports complex.The facilities and a fenced football field, on which work was carried out at a cost of some $13 million, were officially opened by the Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Olivia Grange.“We have now identified the funds and we will put it (studio) right next to this building. What we need is some money for the equipment,” Mr. Montague said, adding that construction work on the studio should begin soon.The State Minister, who is also Member of Parliament for the area, said there are many talented young persons in the area who need to be exposed.“We have to expose the talents of our young persons, so that one day we can hear them say that they are not only from St. Mary, but that they come from Three Hills,” he said.After making the announcement, Mr. Montague asked Minister Grange to assist in acquiring equipment for the studio.In her response, Miss Grange made a commitment to supply the equipment. “I look forward to coming back here to officially declare this studio opened. St. Mary has Capleton, Lady Saw, Tanya Stephens, Beres Hammond and Josie Wales, so the recording studio that we will put in here, will give you more great musicians and great artistes,” she said.center_img RelatedRecording Studio To Be Set Up In Western St. Mary RelatedRecording Studio To Be Set Up In Western St. Marylast_img read more

Read more

JUTC to Distribute 60,000 Smarter Cards

first_imgRelatedCabinet Approves Public-Private Partnership Model for Kingston Terminal JUTC to Distribute 60,000 Smarter Cards TransportJanuary 14, 2014Written by: Chris Patterson JUTC to Distribute 60,000 Smarter CardsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedJUTC Rolls Out 20 More Buses to Increase Seating Capacity Advertisements RelatedJUTC Park and Ride Service to Ease Holiday Congestioncenter_img The Jamaica Urban Transit Company (JUTC) has acquired 60,000 smarter cards to be distributed to the public in preparation of its April 1 crossover to the cashless system.This was disclosed by Deputy Managing Director of Operations at the JUTC, Kirk Finnikin, during a recent interview with JIS News.He informed that the cards are now in circulation at several of the JUTC’s sales offices in the corporate area.The smarter cards are available at JUTC’s Spanish Town Lay-by in St. Catherine and the Half-Way Tree Transport Centre and East Parade office in Kingston.He is also reminding commuters that there is no cost for the smarter cards. “Once you put a minimum of $300 on your smarter card we will give you your smarter card and you can travel on JUTC (buses) until that value expires,” he said.In the meantime, Mr. Finnikin is encouraging commuters to familiarise themselves with their cards as part of efforts for a smooth transition.“We are asking all our commuters to use their smarter cards, to get familiar with it, practice using it, print your own ticket, collect your own ticket, it is the smart way to go,” he said.The introduction of the robust electronic fare collection system forms part of efforts to stop revenue leakage at the JUTC.It will foster greater efficiency in processing commuters boarding the buses, and allow for better concentration among the operators on the key functions of safer driving practices and improved customer service. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsJUTC has acquired 60,000 smarter cards to be distributed to the public in preparation of its April 1 crossover to the cashless system.The cards are now in circulation at several of the JUTC’s sales offices in the corporate area.Commuters are encouraged to familiarise themselves with their cards as part of efforts for a smooth transition. Photo: JIS PhotographerJUTC Deputy Managing of Operations, Kirk Finnikin addresses a JIS Think Tank. Listening is JUTC Managing Director, Colin Campbell. last_img read more

Read more

Restaurant Spotlight: Cinque Terre WEST

first_imgTags :Cinque Terre WESTGianbattista Vinzonipacific palisadesPalisades VillageRestaurant spotlightshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentCity and Coalition settle legal battleGOODBYE SAMOHIYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall5 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson15 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter15 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor15 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press15 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press15 hours ago HomeFeaturedRestaurant Spotlight: Cinque Terre WEST May. 19, 2021 at 6:05 amFeaturedNewsRestaurant Spotlight: Cinque Terre WESTClara Harter3 weeks agoCinque Terre WESTGianbattista Vinzonipacific palisadesPalisades VillageRestaurant spotlightLigurian: The chef hails from the Liguria region of Italy and spent time in the Italian Navy. Courtesy photos As the economy reopens and local restaurants begin the road to recovery the Daily Press is highlighting one excellent eatery a week sharing its history, pandemic struggles, and signature dishes.This week the spotlight is on Cinque Terre WEST — a Ligurian restaurant tucked away in the Palisades that offers a farmers market driven menu with plenty of handmade pastas and fresh seafood dishes.The Story Behind Cinque Terre WESTIt was a winding, adventurous and, at times, perilous road that led Chef Gianbattista Vinzoni to the creation of Cinque Terre WEST, and in a sense back to his roots.Vinzoni grew up in the Liguria region of North West Italy, where he closely observed his grandmother’s traditional cooking methods stomping grapes for wine, pressing olives into olive oil, and preparing pasta from scratch. “We have mountains and oceans, there is nothing flat in between. Seafood is our staple, but we also use things from the mountains like berries and mushrooms,” said Vinzoni, describing the basis of Ligurian cuisine. “We don’t have a lot of space to grow produce, so we do the best possible with every ingredient we have. Simplicity is the number one key”While Vinzoni developed a deep love for fresh food and cooking from an early age, his first job was not in the kitchen but on the sea in the Italian Navy. Later in life he brought the grit and hustle from his military career to the Los Angeles dining scene. When Vinzoni first arrived in America in 1995, he spoke no English and worked as a dishwasher in an Italian restaurant. Through this job he learned Spanish and then English and progressively worked his way through the restaurant ranks. With a combination of talent and tenacity he rose to prominence and took on managing roles in the immense kitchens of Soho House, the Beverly Hilton Hotel, and Fig and Olive.Although he reached great culinary heights, Vinzoni found himself missing the intimacy, simplicity, and quality of small-scale cooking. In 2019 he and his wife Marlo decided to open Cinque Terre WEST as a cozy family restaurant serving classic Lingurian dishes and refreshing Italian wines. On Surviving CovidCinque Terre WEST was not set up to weather a pandemic. The small restaurant hosts just 35 seats and is hidden from view in the back of a small mall in Palisades Village. It relies on seasonal farmers market ingredients that must be thrown away if not eaten in a few days, and on an Italian model of hospitality where friends socialize over long meals and shared dishes. Yet, buoyed by support from devoted community members, Vinzoni and his wife were able to find ways to adapt and stay afloat.They developed a new “comfort menu” based on people’s favorite foods and dishes that are easily transported. Vinzoni even found himself doing the unthinkable—cooking an American hamburger—and discovered it was enormously popular. They started a devoted email list for weekly specials and takeaway offers that grew from just 50 emails to over 700. “The amazing part of the pandemic was the support that we had from the community. It is something that I will never forget for the rest of my life,” said Vinzoni. “They saw me and my wife were here day and night non-stop working and really took us under their wings.”The restaurant has been doing so well the couple are now planning to open a wine bar next door called Enoteca 5. The bar is slated to open later this spring and will feature over 100 varieties of Italian and Californian Wine alongside Vinzoni’s handmade pastas, charcuterie platters, and antipasti dishes. What to order right nowAs the Cinque Terre menu is carefully curated to reflect the best seasonal produce, meat, and fish locally available, Vinzoni said diners can’t go wrong with any selection. He does recommend people sample some seafood, which is the backbone of Ligurian cuisine and what his family has been living on in the Cinque Terre region since the early 1400s.Current options include a pan seared halibut with roasted brussel sprouts and salsa verde; sea bass with potatoes, Taggiasche olives and pine nuts; and homemade bigoli spaghetti with a Maine lobster bisque. Cinque Terre also offers a series of freshly baked pizzas and sweet and savory Italian croissants known as cornetti.For drinks, Vinzoni says most dishes pair well with a Vermentino and recommends true wine lovers check out the selection at Enoteca 5 when it opens. Sweet lovers will enjoy Italian classics such as panna cotta and a flourless chocolate cake. [email protected]last_img read more

Read more

Italian minister lambasts Vivendi

first_img Chris joined the Mobile World Live team in November 2016 having previously worked at a number of UK media outlets including Trinity Mirror, The Press Association and UK telecoms publication Mobile News. After spending 10 years in journalism, he moved… Read more Tags Italy’s minister for economic development, Carlo Calenda, waded into a war of words between Telecom Italia shareholders by slating Vivendi’s record at the helm of the operator, Reuters reported.Citing la Repubblica, the news agency said the minister – who is scheduled to leave his post once political wrangling to form a new government in Italy is concluded – launched scathing criticism of the actions of France-based investor Vivendi.While broadly in favour of non-domestic investment, Calenda said that does not mean standing aside when companies “destroy value” rather than create it.The comments come ahead of a pivotal fortnight for Telecom Italia and amid an increasingly messy tussle between Vivendi, which currently controls the operator’s board, and activist investor Elliott Management.Elliott Management is attempting to install independent directors to Telecom Italia’s board at an AGM on 24 April. The vote is scheduled to take place hours after the resignation of the majority of its current executive team.Although the company’s auditors gave the green light for the election to go ahead, Vivendi last week vowed to open legal proceedings to block the vote in favour of an election to replace the whole board at a separate meeting on 4 May.The latest row is the culmination of weeks of tension between Telecom Italia shareholders. Having previously called for the replacement of several Vivendi executives on the operator’s board, Elliot Management described the planned mass board resignation as a cynical attempt to buy time.Vivendi argued the resignation of the majority of directors triggered a clause which requires a whole new executive team to be appointed at a later date. The company is expected to put forward a new slate of nominees for election in the proposed 4 May meeting. Telecom ItaliaVivendi Las grandes operadoras europeas ponen condiciones a las RAN abiertas AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 16 APR 2018 Home Italian minister lambasts Vivendi Telecom Italia confident on hitting annual goalscenter_img Chris Donkin Telecom Italia bets on long-term renewable energy Related Español Author Previous ArticleQualcomm seeks more time on China NXP approvalNext ArticleOutlook for smartphone sales bleak until 5G last_img read more

Read more